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Trump calls Georgia Senate runoffs 'both illegal and invalid' in New Year's tweets

President TrumpDonald TrumpHouse passes voting rights and elections reform bill DEA places agent seen outside Capitol during riot on leave Georgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee MORE on Friday evening tweeted that next week's Georgia Senate runoff elections are “both illegal and invalid,” even as he has been seeking to convince voters to throw their support behind the GOP senators seeking reelection.

Trump began his series of tweets by reiterating his unsubstantiated claims of “massive corruption which took place in the 2020 Election, which gives us far more votes than is necessary to win all of the Swing States.” 

The president specifically noted a Georgia consent decree that he claimed was “unconstitutional,” which he then claimed made the two Senate races as well as his own loss in the Peach State to President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenThe West needs a more collaborative approach to Taiwan Abbott's medical advisers were not all consulted before he lifted Texas mask mandate House approves George Floyd Justice in Policing Act MORE invalid. 

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The consent decree refers to a March agreement reached by state Democratic and Republican officials that gave voters an opportunity to fix ballots that contained an alleged mismatch between their signature as it appears on their ballot and the signature election officials have on file.

Trump and his allies have argued in multiple failed lawsuits that the consent decree was illegal because the decision did not involve state legislatures. However, as The New York Times reported, several groups have pointed out that Supreme Court rulings allow legislatures to delegate their authority to other state officials.

Trump is scheduled to hold a rally in Dalton, Ga., on Monday, one day before the Senate runoff elections, to encourage his supporters to turn out for GOP Sens. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerGeorgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks Kelly Loeffler's WNBA team sold after players' criticism MORE and David PerdueDavid PerdueGeorgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks Please, President Trump: Drop your quest for revenge and help the GOP MORE, who are facing off against Democratic challengers the Rev. Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockGeorgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Bipartisan bill would ban lawmakers from buying, selling stocks Trump says 2018 endorsement of Kemp 'hurt' Republicans MORE and Jon OssoffJon OssoffGeorgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Wray hints at federal response to SolarWinds hack Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting MORE, respectively. 

Even while campaigning for the GOP candidates, whose elections will determine which party controls the Senate, the president has continued to advance his unfounded allegations of voting irregularities and fraud in November, despite the Electoral College confirming Biden’s win last month. 

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Trump has taken aim at top election officials in Georgia and on Wednesday called for Gov. Brian KempBrian KempGeorgia Gov. Kemp says he'd 'absolutely' back Trump as 2024 nominee Democrats must prepare now for a contested 2024 election Raid the Republican Party to save the party MORE’s (R) resignation, tweeting that the governor is an “obstructionist” and attacking him for refusing to acknowledge that he won the presidential race in Georgia, despite Biden’s roughly 12,000-vote lead in the state.

Kemp dismissed Trump’s remarks, telling reporters that his top priorities were responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and reelecting Perdue and Loeffler. 

“All these other things — there is a constitutional and legal process that is playing out, and I am very comfortable letting that process play out. But that horse has left the barn in Georgia and it’s headed to D.C. right now,” Kemp said of the presidential election. 

“The next vote is going to be there, not here,” he continued. “So people need to be focused on the vote that is happening here, and that is right now in early voting and it will be on Tuesday.”