Warnock declares victory in Georgia Senate runoff as race remains too close to call

Warnock declares victory in Georgia Senate runoff as race remains too close to call
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Democrat Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockPerdue to challenge Kemp in Georgia governor primary: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Congress avoids shutdown Georgia becomes ground zero for 2022 elections MORE declared victory in his runoff election against Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerPerdue to challenge Kemp in Georgia governor primary: report Senate GOP worries Trump could derail bid for majority Perdue mulling primary challenge against Kemp in Georgia: report MORE (R-Ga.) early Wednesday morning, as incoming vote tallies painted an increasingly optimistic picture for Democratic efforts to win control of the Senate.

“We were told that we couldn’t win this election, but tonight we proved that with hope, hard work and the people by our side, anything is possible,” Warnock said.

“So Georgia, I am honored by the faith that you have shown in me and I promise you this tonight: I am going to the Senate to work for all of Georgia, no matter who you cast your vote for in this election,” he said.

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The outcome of the race between Warnock and Loeffler — one of two Senate runoffs that took place on Tuesday — hasn’t been called yet and as Warnock spoke he led Loeffler by less than 1 percentage point.

But heading into Wednesday morning, the outlook appeared positive for Warnock, who is expected to benefit from incoming vote counts out of Atlanta and its suburbs. 

Those votes are expected to heavily favor both Warnock and Democrat Jon Ossoff, who is challenging Republican David PerdueDavid PerduePerdue to challenge Kemp in Georgia governor primary: report Georgia becomes ground zero for 2022 elections The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks up bright side beneath omicron's cloud MORE in a separate runoff election.

The election is not yet decided. Despite the dimming outlook for Republicans, Loeffler said early Wednesday that she has no plans to concede the race, insisting that she still has “a path to victory.”

“It’s worth it for this election to last into tomorrow,” Loeffler told supporters. “We’re going to make sure that every vote is counted … every legal vote is going to be counted.”

In Georgia’s other Senate runoff, Perdue and Ossoff are running neck-and-neck. But like Warnock, Ossoff appears poised to benefit from remaining votes in the heavily Democratic area around Atlanta. 

On the line in the two runoffs is control of the Senate. Republicans currently hold a 50-to-48 seat advantage in the upper chamber. If both Warnock and Ossoff win their respective races, however, it would give Democrats a divided Senate in which Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden cannot allow his domestic fumbles to transfer to the world stage Joe Manchin should embrace paid leave — now The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden defends disappointing jobs report MORE would cast the tie-breaking vote.