SPONSORED:

Warnock, Ossoff to be sworn into Senate Wednesday afternoon

Warnock, Ossoff to be sworn into Senate Wednesday afternoon
© Getty Images

Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockKelly Loeffler's WNBA team sold after players' criticism The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting MORE and Jon OssoffJon OssoffGeorgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting Koch-backed group launches ads urging lawmakers to reject COVID-19 relief bill Perdue rules out 2022 Senate bid against Warnock MORE will be sworn in as Georgia’s new senators on Wednesday, hours after President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors Biden celebrates vaccine approval but warns 'current improvement could reverse' MORE and Vice President-elect Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisDwayne 'The Rock' Johnson vs. Donald Trump: A serious comparison Exclusive: How Obama went to bat for Warren To unite America, Biden administration must brace for hate MORE take their oaths of office. 

The swearing-in ceremonies for the two Georgia Democrats will take place at the U.S. Capitol at 4:30 p.m. EST, their campaigns announced on Tuesday. The ceremonies will be presided over by Kamala Harris, who at that point will be vice president. 

Earlier on Tuesday, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger certified their electoral victories, reaffirming the two Democrats as the next senators from Georgia.

ADVERTISEMENT

Warnock and Ossoff won a pair of runoff elections earlier this month, ousting Sen. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerKelly Loeffler's WNBA team sold after players' criticism Please, President Trump: Drop your quest for revenge and help the GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan MORE (R-Ga.) and former Sen. David PerdueDavid PerduePlease, President Trump: Drop your quest for revenge and help the GOP The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Georgia's GOP-led Senate passes bill requiring ID for absentee voting MORE (R-Ga.), respectively. 

Their victories were a massive boon to Democrats, effectively handing the party control of the Senate. Once they are sworn in, the upper chamber will be split evenly between the two parties, though Harris will cast the deciding vote in the event of a tie.

Both Warnock and Ossoff will break barriers when they are sworn in. 

Warnock will become Georgia’s first Black senator and only the second Black senator from a southern state since Reconstruction. Ossoff, meanwhile, will be the first Jewish senator from Georgia.

Once a Republican stronghold, Georgia has become one of the fastest-growing and most-diverse battlegrounds in the country, marked by fierce and increasingly close elections.

ADVERTISEMENT

Biden became the first Democratic presidential candidate to win the state in nearly three decades in November after he narrowly defeated President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE in Georgia. 

Ossoff and Warnock didn’t receive enough support at the time to win their respective races outright. But both advanced to runoff elections that garnered national attention and hundreds of millions of dollars in political spending.

Their victories in the Jan. 6 runoff elections were driven by record-shattering voter turnout, especially in Democratic-leaning parts of the state, like Atlanta and its sprawling suburbs.