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Marjorie Taylor Greene gets first Democratic midterm opponent

Rep. Marjorie Taylor GreeneMarjorie Taylor GreeneRep. Marjorie Taylor Greene says she's meeting with Trump 'soon' in Florida QAnon site shutters after reports identifying developer Republicans head to runoff in GA-14 MORE (R-Ga.) attracted her first Democratic midterm opponent Wednesday following a bipartisan firestorm over past controversial comments. 

Holly McCormack launched her campaign in Georgia’s 14th Congressional District Wednesday, casting herself as an advocate for small businesses who would fight against the “noise.” She runs an insurance agency based in Chattanooga, Tenn. but says she lives in nearby Ringgold, Ga.

“Once thriving communities are now hanging by a thread. There’s real frustration walking these streets. Our towns aren’t what they used to be,” McCormack said in her campaign launch video. “We are hardworking people that just want a shot at the American dream. But for the people of northwest Georgia, the American dream seems out of reach.”

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“Rural Americans have been left behind by noisy politicians who are only looking out for the next headline. No one is looking out for northwest Georgia,” she added. “It’s time to cut through the noise and get to work.” 

The Democrat stayed away from calling out Greene by name in her launch video, but has been more critical on social media, saying Greene’s controversial remarks led her to jump into the race.

“I never thought I would run for Congress. But I couldn't sit back while Marge spews hatred. Her views do not represent the people of Northwest Georgia, and pretty soon neither will she,” she tweeted Wednesday. 

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Greene this month was stripped from her committee assignments over past remarks calling for violence against Democrats, claiming school shootings were staged and expressing bigoted remarks. She has also made comments in support of the groundless QAnon conspiracy theory. 

While the Georgia Republican has been a lightning rod for criticism, McCormack – or any Democrat – would face an uphill battle unseating her in the ruby red northwest Georgia district. 

After winning a brutal primary, Greene bested her Democratic opponent by about 50 points in the November general election.

In a sign of how conservative Georgia’s 14th Congressional District is, McCormack makes no mention of her party affiliation in her announcement video or on her website. Her ties to the Democratic Party are only tucked into a filing with the Federal Election Commission announcing the formation of her campaign.

McCormack did not immediately respond to an interview request from The Hill.