Republican House campaign arm rakes in $33.7 million in first quarter

Republican House campaign arm rakes in $33.7 million in first quarter
© Greg Nash

The campaign arm for House Republicans raked in $33.7 million in the first quarter of 2021 as the party looks to overtake Democrats’ slim majority and win control of the lower chamber in the 2022 midterms.

The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) announced Thursday that its haul was aided by a $19.1 million windfall in March, which broke its fundraising record for any off-year record by $3.6 million. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthySunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe Democrats question GOP shift on vaccines Has Trump beaten the system? MORE (R-Calif.) also contributed $5.3 million, and House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseDemocrats question GOP shift on vaccines The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi considers adding GOP voices to Jan. 6 panel McConnell pushes vaccines, but GOP muddles his message MORE (R-La.) gave $3.5 million. 

The NRCC ended the first quarter with $29.7 million cash on hand and no debt.

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The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), the NRCC’s Democratic counterpart, has not yet released its first quarter fundraising figures, though it did raise a combined $18.5 million in January and February. 

The DCCC had $25.9 million cash on hand and $11 million in debt at the end of February.

“Republican voters are motivated to fire Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Bipartisan infrastructure talks drag on; Democrats plow ahead with Jan. 6 probe House Democrats grow frustrated as they feel ignored by Senate Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' MORE, stop Democrats’ socialist agenda and take back the House,” NRCC spokesman Michael McAdams said in a statement.

The haul comes as the GOP looks to the 2022 midterms as a prime chance to win back the House, which was lost in the 2018 blue wave.

Democrats hold one of the smallest majorities in modern history, and history is on Republicans’ side given that the party in the White House typically loses seats in the midterms. 

Republicans only need to flip five seats to win control of the lower chamber and last month rolled out a list of 47 seats it views as potential pickup opportunities.