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Tim Scott to participate in GOP event in Iowa

Tim Scott to participate in GOP event in Iowa
© Greg Nash

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottPolice reform talks hit familiar stumbling block Biden adds pressure to congressional talks with self-imposed deadlines Republicans can win back control in 2022 — if they don't 'cancel' themselves first MORE (R-S.C.) is set to participate in a GOP event in Iowa this week, likely fueling speculation about a potential presidential bid in 2024. 

The Iowa Republican Party said Scott is set to join a reception Thursday hosted by party chair Jeff Kaufmann that will also feature Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Overnight Defense: Capitol security bill includes 1M to reimburse National Guard | Turner to lead House push against military sexual assault | Pentagon drops mask mandate GOP Rep. Turner to lead House push to address military sexual assault MORE (R-Iowa) and Gov. Kim Reynolds (R).

“Chairman Kaufmann will lead an interview-style discussion with Senator Tim Scott, Senator Joni Ernst, and Governor Kim Reynolds,” the party said.

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Scott joins a number of other potential 2024 contenders in visiting Iowa in recent months, including Sens. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) and Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Opposition to refugees echoes one of America's most shameful moments White House defends CDC outreach to teachers union MORE (R-Ark.) and former Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans US Olympic Committee urges Congress not to boycott Games in China Pompeo on CIA recruitment: We can't risk national security to appease 'liberal, woke agenda' MORE.

The South Carolina Republican has not publicly addressed speculation that he might run for president in 2024, but his name has been floated as a candidate who could bridge the establishment and pro-Trump flanks of the party given his conservative stances, support for former President TrumpDonald TrumpFranklin Graham says Trump comeback would 'be a very tough thing to do' Man suspected in wife's disappearance accused of casting her ballot for Trump Stefanik: Cheney is 'looking backwards' MORE’s agenda and mild demeanor.

While Iowa holds outsized sway given its top slot in the primary calendar, the South Carolinian could also hold an advantage in his home state, which also holds one of the earliest nominating contests.