Michigan Senate finds no evidence of fraud in 2020 election

A report from the GOP-controlled Michigan state Senate released Wednesday found no evidence of fraud in the 2020 election.

The report from the state Senate Oversight Committee affirmed that there was no evidence of fraud in the election. 

“The Committee can confidently assert that it has been thorough in examination of numerous allegations of unlawful actions, improper procedures, fraud, vote theft, or any other description which would cause citizens to doubt the integrity of Michigan’s 2020 election results,” the committee wrote.

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“Our clear finding is that citizens should be confident the results represent the true results of the ballots cast by the people of Michigan,” the panel continued.

The report is the latest to rebuke false claims by former President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - White House, Dems play blame game over evictions The Memo: Left pins hopes on Nina Turner in Ohio after recent defeats Biden administration to keep Trump-era rule of turning away migrants during pandemic MORE and his allies that the 2020 election was riddled with widespread voter fraud.

Michigan was one of a handful of key swing states that Trump lost. The state was hit with dozens of GOP-led lawsuits seeking to overturn the results of the state, all of which were unsuccessful.

Biden won just over 50 percent of the vote in the state, compared to Trump’s 48 percent.

The panel said that while there are weaknesses in the state’s election system, there was no evidence of widespread fraud.

The report particularly took aim at false claims made about the election in Antrim County, where human errors led to incorrect initial results, according to The Detroit News.

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The official tally showed that Trump won the GOP-leaning county with 61 percent of the vote, compared to Biden’s 37 percent, the newspaper reported.

The committee asserted that using Antrim county as evidence of widespread voter fraud is baseless, and called for an investigation into people who use the county “to raise money or publicity for their own ends.”

State Sen. Edward McBroom (R), chairman of the committee, also dismissed the claims about the county in a letter attached to the report.

“All compelling theories that sprang forth from the rumors surrounding Antrim County are diminished so significantly as for it to be a complete waste of time to consider them further,” McBroom wrote.