Cuomo kicked off ActBlue fundraising platform

Cuomo kicked off ActBlue fundraising platform
© Getty

New York Gov. Andrew CuomoAndrew CuomoThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Arizona recount to show Trump's loss by even wider margin Former co-worker accuses Chris Cuomo of sexual harassment in NYT essay NY health chief criticized over state's COVID-19 response resigns MORE (D) was kicked off Democratic fundraising platform ActBlue on Thursday amid growing fallout from a report detailing instances in which he sexually harassed nearly a dozen women.

An ActBlue spokesperson confirmed to The Hill that Cuomo was removed from the platform, which is the party’s top tool for digital fundraising and has been crucial in giving Democrats a fundraising edge among grassroots donors. Axios first reported on Cuomo’s removal.

Pages for Cuomo's campaign and PAC were not active as of Thursday afternoon, and both pages showed an error message telling users “You have attempted to make a contribution to a fundraising page that has no active recipients.” 

ADVERTISEMENT

“Either the page's owner has removed all committees or organizations from the page, or we have concluded processing contributions for these committees or organizations,” the message continues. 

Cuomo has not said much publicly about running for a fourth term next year, but has not given any indications yet that he would consider retiring after his current term is up in early 2023. However, should he run, his absence from ActBlue would be a significant blow to his ability to engage in grassroots fundraising.

The move is just the latest in a string of rebukes against Cuomo from Democrats who have expressed outrage over the report’s release Tuesday.

Lawmakers in the state Assembly are ramping up an impeachment effort that is expected to wrap up in the coming weeks, and prominent lawmakers from Albany and Washington have called on Cuomo to resign over the report, which detailed claims of harassment and misconduct from 11 women.

“This report highlights unacceptable behavior by Governor Cuomo and his administration. As I said when these disturbing allegations first came to light, the Governor must resign for the good of the state,” state Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins (D) said in a statement Tuesday. “Now that the investigation is complete and the allegations have been substantiated, it should be clear to everyone that he can no longer serve as Governor.” 

In a sign that the scandal has taken a toll on Cuomo’s political prospects, a Marist poll conducted Tuesday evening found that 63 percent of registered New York voters believe Cuomo should resign, and only 12 percent think he deserves reelection, including just 18 percent of Democrats. 

Cuomo’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.