Anti-abortion group targets Democrats ahead of 2022

Anti-abortion group targets Democrats ahead of 2022
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The Susan B. Anthony List, a conservative anti-abortion group, is targeting a number of House and Senate Democrats on their stances ahead of the 2022 midterm elections in a new six-figure campaign. 

The campaign, which includes a number of digital ads, press tours and phone calls, is set to take place while lawmakers are on recess this month. The Hill was the first outlet to report on the campaign. 

The group has labeled the Democrats targeted in the campaign "The Terrible 20" and focuses on Democratic lawmakers who refused to support the Hyde Amendment, which bans federal programs such as Medicaid from covering the costs of abortion services. 

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“Senators and Representatives who insist on forcing taxpayers to fund abortion on demand and support barbaric, late abortions without limits must and will face the consequences of their extremism at the ballot box. SBA List’s ongoing campaign to expose abortion extremism in battleground states and districts includes a multi-faceted education campaign and even door-to-door visits from our field team,” said Susan B. Anthony List spokesperson Mallory Quigley. 

The lawmakers being targeted are Sens. Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockGOP's embrace of Trump's false claims creates new perils Tom Glavine, Ric Flair, Doug Flutie to join Trump for Herschel Walker event Democratic incumbents bolster fundraising advantage in key Senate races MORE (Ga.) and Mark KellyMark KellyDemocratic incumbents bolster fundraising advantage in key Senate races Warnock raises .5 million in third quarter Anti-Trump Republicans endorsing vulnerable Democrats to prevent GOP takeover MORE (Ariz.) and Reps. Deborah Ross (N.C.), Tom O’Halleran (Ariz.), Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyDemocratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse On The Money — Progressives play hard ball on Biden budget plan Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Climate divides conservative Democrats in reconciliation push MORE (Fla.), Lucy McBathLucia (Lucy) Kay McBathBiden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  Early redistricting plans show GOP retrenching for long haul Draft Georgia congressional lines target McBath, shore up Bourdeaux MORE (Ga.), Carolyn Bordeaux (Ga.), Cindy AxneCindy AxneDemocratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse Club for Growth squeezes front-line Democrats on reconciliation plan Biden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  MORE (Iowa), Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsLawmakers laud diversity gains in Congress Biden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  Ohio GOP congressman tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (Kansas), Jared Golden (Maine), Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinDemocrats fret as longshot candidates pull money, attention Bleak midterm outlook shadows bitter Democratic battle Hillicon Valley — Presented by American Edge Project — Americans blame politicians, social media for spread of misinformation: poll MORE (Mich.), Haley StevensHaley Maria StevensWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Katie Hill launches effort to protect Democratic majority in House Biden approval ratings drop in seven key congressional districts: GOP-aligned poll MORE (Mich.), Christopher PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasDemocratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse Club for Growth squeezes front-line Democrats on reconciliation plan Gail Huff Brown, wife of Scott Brown, jumps into congressional race in New Hampshire MORE (N.H.), Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanTwo senior House Democrats to retire Democratic retirements could make a tough midterm year even worse Tim Ryan's campaign raises .5 million in third quarter MORE (Ohio), Susan WildSusan WildDemocrats weigh changes to drug pricing measure to win over moderates Biden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  Congress needs to help schools meet mental health challenges MORE (Pa.), Matt CartwrightMatthew (Matt) Alton CartwrightI've seen the tragedy of Camp Lejeune — we can't wait any longer to help those impacted by toxic water Democrats fret over Trump-district retirements ahead of midterms Anti-abortion group targets Democrats ahead of 2022 MORE (Pa.), Connor Lamb (Pa.), Vicente Gonzalez (Texas), Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaFormer VA secretaries propose National Warrior Call Day to raise military suicide awareness Business groups create new headache for Pelosi Chamber of Commerce warns moderate Democrats against voting for reconciliation MORE (Virginia) and Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazio'Design-build' contracts key to infrastructure success EPA closer to unveiling plan for tackling 'forever chemicals' Congress sends 30-day highway funding patch to Biden after infrastructure stalls MORE (Oregon). 

The Hyde Amendment has been added to federal spending bills every year since 1976. Last month, it was not included in the spending bill introduced and then cleared by the House Appropriations labor and health and human services subcommittee.

Republicans and Democrats have supported the amendment in the past, but during last year's presidential campaign, President BidenJoe BidenJan. 6 panel lays out criminal contempt case against Bannon Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed Two House Democrats to retire ahead of challenging midterms MORE reversed his previous support for it and vowed to end it after coming under pressure from fellow Democrats and advocacy groups.

The abortion debate will likely play in next year's midterms, as abortion rights groups are warning that the Supreme Court could use a Mississippi case to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade decision.