Trump to hold rallies in Iowa, Georgia

Trump to hold rallies in Iowa, Georgia
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Former President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer Sen. Heller to run for Nevada governor Overnight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right MORE is planning to hold rallies in Iowa and Georgia as he seeks to exert his influence over the GOP and toys with a 2024 presidential bid.

Details are still being arranged for the two events, but a source familiar with the matter confirmed to The Hill that the two states will host Trump for rallies. 

Iowa is a crucial state on the election calendar, traditionally holding the nation's first nominating contest. Georgia is a key swing state that went for a Democratic presidential nominee for the first time in decades in 2020 and has been the epicenter of Trump’s unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud. 

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Trump has looked to maintain his perch as the de facto head of the Republican Party, attending fundraisers, holding rallies and doling out endorsements to candidates across the country who are eager to tap into his connection with the GOP electorate.

Those efforts in part have kept him at the top of most polls of potential 2024 primary candidates, indicating he’d be the odds-on favorite to win the GOP presidential nomination in three years if he decides to make a third White House run.

The former president raised eyebrows earlier this month when he hired two top GOP operatives in Iowa.

Trump has also asserted his presence in Georgia, supporting a flood of lawsuits fruitlessly seeking to overturn his defeat there and backing a poll showing Gov. Brian KempBrian KempOSHA faces big challenge with Biden vaccine mandate DOJ launches civil rights investigation of violence in Georgia prisons DeSantis: Local governments will face K fines for imposing vaccine mandates MORE (R), who has refuted claims of voter fraud, in a poor position ahead of his own primary. 

While Trump’s flirtations with a 2024 campaign have helped put other would-be candidates in limbo, some have apparently started laying the groundwork for their own bids. Former Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceWoodward book: Quayle advised Pence he had 'no flexibility' in overturning election Overnight Health Care — Departing FDA vaccine regulators argue against COVID-19 booster shots GOP sees Biden vaccine mandates as energizing issue for midterms MORE, former Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoAmerica needs a new strategy for Pacific Island Countries Harris to hold fundraiser for McAuliffe ahead of Virginia governor's race It's in our interest to turn the page on relations with Suriname MORE, former United Nations Ambassador Nikki HaleyNikki HaleyHarris to hold fundraiser for McAuliffe ahead of Virginia governor's race Allies see rising prospect of Trump 2024 White House bid Trump schedules rallies in Iowa, Georgia MORE, Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonOvernight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by Climate Power — Senate Democrats ding Biden energy proposal MORE (R-Ark.) and more have traveled to Iowa and other swing states.

Other potential candidates include Sens. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyOvernight Defense & National Security — Milley becomes lightning rod Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley becomes lightning rod on right Hawley pledges to slow walk Biden's Pentagon, State picks over messy Afghanistan exit MORE (R-Mo.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Industries for the Blind - Schumer: Dem unity will happen eventually; Newsom prevails The Memo: Like the dress or not, Ocasio-Cortez is driving the conversation again Ocasio-Cortez defends attendance of Met Gala amid GOP uproar MORE (R-Texas), Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisFlorida landlord requiring proof of vaccinations from tenants Anthrax was the COVID-19 of 2001 Governors brace for 2022 after year in pandemic spotlight MORE (R), Texas Gov. Greg AbbottGreg AbbottJudge schedules Oct. 1 hearing on DOJ request to halt Texas abortion law 24 Democratic AGs back Biden bid to block Texas abortion law COVID-19 hospitalizations starting to plateau in Dallas area, official says MORE (R) and South Dakota Gov. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemOSHA faces big challenge with Biden vaccine mandate Overnight Health Care — Departing FDA vaccine regulators argue against COVID-19 booster shots DeSantis: Local governments will face K fines for imposing vaccine mandates MORE (R).

Trump has repeatedly declined to definitively say if he’s running, though has said his supporters will be “happy” with his choice.