Fetterman raises nearly $2.7 million in third quarter

Fetterman raises nearly $2.7 million in third quarter
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Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman (D) raised nearly $2.7 million in the third quarter of 2021 for his Senate bid next year, bolstering his financial standing in what is expected to be a hard-fought Democratic primary.

Fetterman’s campaign said in a statement Monday that the haul was fueled by 94,000 donations, including money from more than 24,000 first-time donors. It also marks a slight bump from the $2.5 million he raised in the second quarter.

The lieutenant governor has thus far raised more than $9.2 million in all of 2021.

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“I could not be more proud and thankful that quarter after quarter our movement is continuing to grow even bigger,” said Fetterman. “I am blown away by the support we have across the Commonwealth, and the fact that we have donations from over 87% of Pennsylvania zip codes is amazing. On top of that, to have received well over 325,000 individual contributions from over 150,000 people is truly humbling.”

Fetterman has emerged as a prolific fundraiser in the crowded Democratic field in the Keystone State, which is hosting one of the 2022 midterm’s marquee contests to replace retiring Sen. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (R).

Rep. Conor Lamb, Montgomery County Commission Chair Val Arkoosh and state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta are among the other high-profile Democrats running for Toomey’s seat.

None have released third quarter fundraising yet, though they have been unable to keep financial pace with Fetterman.

The race is one of Democrats’ top pickup opportunities in the Senate next year. The state narrowly went for former President TrumpDonald TrumpRobert Gates says 'extreme polarization' is the greatest threat to US democracy Cassidy says he won't vote for Trump if he runs in 2024 Schiff says holding Bannon in criminal contempt 'a way of getting people's attention' MORE in 2016 before swinging back narrowly to President BidenJoe BidenManchin lays down demands for child tax credit: report Abrams targets Black churchgoers during campaign stops for McAuliffe in Virginia Pentagon, State Department square off on Afghanistan accountability MORE last year. A flip would be a significant boon to Democrats, who are holding on to a 50-50 majority in the Senate and defending seats in states like Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and New Hampshire. 

Veteran Sean Parnell and businessman Jeff Bartos are the two most prominent candidates running in the GOP primary.