House GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal

House GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal
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The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) rolled out a critical ad campaign targeting vulnerable House Democrats over their party's proposal to increase the amount of information the IRS receives about banking transactions. 

The 19-second Halloween-themed ad accuses Democrats of "hiring an army of IRS agents to spy on your bank account."

The campaign targets 15 House Democrats: Reps. Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyFive takeaways: House passes Biden's sweeping benefits bill Overnight Energy & Environment — House passes giant climate, social policy bill House passes giant social policy and climate measure MORE (Fla.), Tom O’Halleran (Ariz.), Katie Porter (Calif.), Jahana HayesJahana HayesHouse GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' Katie Hill launches effort to protect Democratic majority in House MORE (Conn.), Cindy AxneCindy AxneTop House Democratic group launches six-figure ad campaign to sell infrastructure package State Democrat group teams up with federal lawmakers to elect down-ballot candidates Conservative group targeting House Democrats over SALT positions MORE (Iowa), Marie Newman (Ill.), Jared GoldenJared GoldenSunday shows preview: Boosters open to all US adults; House Dems pass spending plan on to Senate Five takeaways: House passes Biden's sweeping benefits bill Overnight Energy & Environment — House passes giant climate, social policy bill MORE (Maine), Dan KildeeDaniel (Dan) Timothy KildeeBiden, top officials spread out to promote infrastructure package Group aligned with House GOP leadership targeting nine Democrats on spending vote House GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal MORE (Mich.), Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasTop House Democratic group launches six-figure ad campaign to sell infrastructure package Booker headlining Democratic fundraiser in New Hampshire GOP primary in NH House race draws national spotlight MORE (N.H.), Andy Kim (N.J.), Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiCNN airs live footage of its reporting on tennis star being censored in China Lawmakers increasingly anxious about US efforts against Russian hackers Group aligned with House GOP leadership targeting nine Democrats on spending vote MORE (N.J.), Tom Suozzi (N.Y.), Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoAbortion rights group endorsing 12 House Democrats House GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal US Chamber targets more House Democrats with ads opposing .5T bill MORE (N.Y.), Susan WildSusan WildThe Philippines is a frontline of another cold war GOP sees inflation as winning issue 'Finally, infrastructure week!': White House celebrates T bill MORE (Penn.), and Kim SchrierKimberly (Kim) Merle SchrierWashington redistricting panel reaches late agreement on new lines House GOP campaign arm releases ad hitting Democrats on IRS bank-reporting proposal New school year, new urgency to fight COVID-19 MORE (Wash.). 

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The NRCC noted that its internal polling found that 57 percent of voters said they would be less likely to support a Democrat who backed the proposal. 

The proposal would require banks to report to the IRS the total amount of money that came in and out of an account during a given year. The IRS would not receive information about specific transactions. Democrats and Biden administration officials argue that the proposal would help the IRS enforce tax laws against wealthy tax cheats. 

The Biden administration originally called for the reporting requirement to apply to accounts with more than $600 in deposits and withdrawals in a year. Last week, congressional Democrats narrowed the scope of the proposal, raising the threshold to $10,000 and excluding wage income from that amount.

However, recent criticisms from Democrats indicate that the proposal may not make it in the final bill. Some Democrats in the House and the Senate, including Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinBiden faces new pressure from climate groups after Powell pick Five ways Senate could change Biden's spending plan With extreme gerrymanders locking in, Biden needs to make democracy preservation job one MORE (W.Va.) and Rep. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerSunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variant emerges; supply chain issues and inflation persist On The Money — Biden sticks with Powell despite pressure Spanberger calls on Biden to appoint supply chain czar MORE (Va.), have expressed concerns over how Americans' privacy would be impacted by the proposal. 

The ad comes after the NRCC released new internal polling on Tuesday showing Republicans on track to retake the House in 2022. Republicans have a 43 percent to 40 percent lead over Democrats with registered voters in the generic ballot across 85 potential battleground districts, according to the poll.

Updated at 11:43 a.m.