The Hill's Coronavirus Report: California backtracks on reopening as cases soar nationwide; SoapBox CEO David Simnick says nimble firms can work around supply chain chokepoints to access supplies for sanitizers and hygienic materials

The Hill's Coronavirus Report: California backtracks on reopening as cases soar nationwide; SoapBox CEO David Simnick says nimble firms can work around supply chain chokepoints to access supplies for sanitizers and hygienic materials

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY

> Operation Warp Speed pushing for COVID-19 therapeutics by early fall 

> California backtracks on reopening amid surge in cases

> Major coronavirus testing company says turnaround time averaging at least 7 days

> Travelers to New York from 19 states must give contact info or face fines

> McConnell in talks with Mnunchin on next round of coronavirus relief  

> Biden focuses on coronavirus in first ad in traditionally red Texas

> Four former CDC directors blast Trump over politicizing science, agency

> England to mandate face coverings in shops and supermarkets

> SoapBox CEO David Simnick says nimble firms can work around supply chain chokepoints to access supplies for sanitizers and hygienic materials, says soap, clean water, wearing masks are key to rolling back COVID-19



THE INTERVIEW

David Simnick, CEO and co-founder, SoapBox

SoapBox CEO David Simnick says nimble firms can work around supply chain chokepoints to access supplies for sanitizers and hygienic materials, says soap, clean water and wearing masks are key to rolling back COVID-19.

 

 

 

 

Watch the full interview here



THE HILL’S CORONAVIRUS REPORT

Welcome to The Hill's Coronavirus Report. It's Tuesday, July 14.

Your Coronavirus Report team includes Steve Clemons, editor-at-large of The Hill, and researcher Andrew Wargofchik. Follow us on Twitter at @SCClemons and @a_wargofchik

 

Click here to subscribe to The Hill’s Coronavirus Report

Click here to subscribe to our Overnight Healthcare Newsletter to stay up-to-date on all things coronavirus



THE HILL 'VIRTUALLY' LIVE

Wednesday, July 15 | New Threats, New Defense: The Future of National Security

 

On Wednesday, July 15, The Hill Virtually Live hosts “New Threats, New Defense: The Future of National Security” featuring an interview with Secretary of State Michael Pompeo by The Hill's Editor-in-Chief Bob CusackRobert (Bob) CusackThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Progress slow on coronavirus bill The Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks Hillicon Valley: House panel grills tech CEOs during much anticipated antitrust hearing | TikTok to make code public as it pushes back against 'misinformation' | House Intel panel expands access to foreign disinformation evidence MORE. What fields of national security work need to be invented or reinvented today? We will host a focused discussion on what programs and assets make sense for the future. RSVP Today! 


Have a question for our speakers? Tweet us @TheHillEvents using #TheHillNatSec and we’ll feature your question live in the program.



CORONAVIRUS NUMBERS AT A GLANCE

There are 13,165,663 reported cases of COVID-19 throughout the world and 574,615 global deaths attributed to the virus as of the time of this newsletter. 

 

The U.S. is reporting 3,387,053 cases and 135,984 deaths. Brazil 1,884,967 cases. India 906,752. Russia 738,787. Peru 330,123. Chile 319,493. Mexico 304,435. U.K. 292,931. South Africa 287,796. Iran 262,173. Spain 256,619. Pakistan 253,604. Italy 243,344. Saudi Arabia 237,803.


Reid Wilson, The Hill’s national correspondent, is back with more analysis of the U.S. caseload: 

> Alabama's seven-day rolling average is at a record high with 1,376 cases a day.

> Alaska's seven-day average hits record of 57 after its first day of more than 100 cases Sunday.

> Arizona's seven-day average is just under its peak from last week.

> Arkansas’s seven-day average climbs to record 650 following its first day of 1,000+ cases on Saturday.

> California is averaging 8,000 new cases a day.

> Colorado's seven-day average is at its highest level since early May.

> Florida's seven-day average is near 10,000. They reported 15,300 new cases on Sunday — the single worst day of any state so far.

> Georgia’s seven-day average is at a record 2,700.

> Idaho's seven-day average hit a new high.

> Kentucky's seven-day average climbs to a new record.

> Louisiana's seven-day average is its highest so far.

> Mississippi's seven-day average hits a record at 770.

> Missouri’s seven-day average hit its highest yet at 691.

> Montana had its first day of more than 100 cases on Friday. Its seven-day average is at a record 78.

> New Mexico’s seven-day average hit a record 253.

> North Carolina's seven-day average climbs to record 1,833.

 

The U.S. is reporting the results of 41,004,275 COVID-19 tests and 1,031,939 have recovered from the virus.



WASHINGTON WATCH

McConnell in talks with Mnuchin on next phase of coronavirus relief. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOn The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate Democrats say White House isn't budging in coronavirus relief stalemate MORE (R-Ky.) said Monday that he is in discussions with Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinOn The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' US Chamber asks Treasury to clear up 'serious concerns' about payroll tax deferral Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate MORE on the next phase of coronavirus relief and predicted the Senate will begin working on the legislation more widely next week. McConnell said he’s been working closely with Mnuchin over the past few weeks and will begin sharing the emerging work product with the rest of the Senate GOP conference after colleagues return to Washington on July 20. (The Hill

 

White House campaign advocates new 'pathways' to jobs amid pandemic. A White House campaign released Tuesday is advocating for new “pathways” to jobs as the coronavirus pandemic has left many Americans out of work. The campaign entitled “Find Something New” encourages Americans who are unemployed or unhappy in their jobs or careers to seek out new opportunities. (The Hill

 

Biden focuses on coronavirus in his first ad in traditionally red Texas. Joe BidenJoe BidenRon Johnson signals some GOP senators concerned about his Obama-era probes On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, is trying to parlay concern about the novel coronavirus into support in Texas, a traditionally Republican state where his campaign is debuting its first television ad. The 60-second spot makes no mention of President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE but seeks to portray Biden as an empathetic and steady leader, locked in on the challenge of the pandemic. (Washington Post



LAWMAKERS TWEET

Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Democrats seek to exploit Trump-GOP tensions in COVID-19 talks Liability shield fight threatens to blow up relief talks MORE (D-R.I.) 

@SenWhitehouse In the midst of a global pandemic ravaging our country, we are seeing the greatest health insurance losses ever recorded – and @realDonaldTrump and the Republican party are in court trying to undermine health coverage for millions more.

 

Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyDavis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump State aid emerges as major hurdle to reviving COVID-19 talks From a Republican donor to Senate GOP: Remove marriage penalty or risk alienating voters MORE (R-La.) 

@SenBillCassidy So while the NBA is busy sucking up to China to make a buck, millions of Hong Kongers face increasing prospects that the #CCP is grossly encroaching on their freedoms. #StandWithHongKong. 

 

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOn The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden, Harris make first public appearance as running mates Booker hits back at Trump tweet, mocks misspelling of name MORE (D-N.J.) 

@SenBooker Farming in America in the last 70 years has gone from raising animals in a more humane, pasture-based model to factory farming that’s harmful to public health, workers & our environment. It’s time we end this broken system with my Farm System Reform Act.



ACROSS THE NATION

California orders new closures as U.S. retreat from coronavirus reopenings accelerates. California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin NewsomBass on filling Harris's Senate spot: 'I'll keep all my options open' Newsom says he has already received a number of pitches for Harris's open Senate seat Here's who could fill Kamala Harris's Senate seat if she becomes VP MORE on Monday announced a dramatic rollback in the state’s reopening plan, ordering a wide swath of businesses to end indoor operations as coronavirus case numbers continued to climb in the nation’s largest state — and well beyond. Restaurants, wineries, movie theaters and museums were told to shut down their indoor operations, while bars were closed even for outdoor service. In hard-hit counties, hair salons, malls and fitness centers were also shuttered. (Washington Post

 

Travelers to New York from 19 states must give contact info or face fines. New York on Tuesday started requiring travelers from 19 states flagged for high coronavirus spread to share personal information and travel plans at airports — or face a $2,000 fine. The updating list of states subject to coronavirus-driven travel restrictions has expanded from eight to 19 since Cuomo and the governors of New Jersey and Connecticut last month told people coming in from problematic areas to self-quarantine for 14 days. (Washington Post

 

Houston mayor proposes two-week shutdown 'at the minimum' to quell COVID-19 spread. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner (D) on Monday proposed a two-week shutdown “at the minimum” to quell the coronavirus pandemic. The mayor tweeted that he made his recommendation to Gov. Greg Abbott (R), telling the governor it will "help blunt" the spread of coronavirus. (The Hill

 

Education board in California's Orange County votes to reopen schools without requiring masks. The county Board of Education in Orange County, Calif., on Monday voted to approve school reopening recommendations that do not require masks for students or social distancing in schools. In a 4-1 vote, the board approved recommendations that include frequent hand-washing, daily temperature checks and nightly disinfection of facilities and vehicles, but did not include mandatory masks for students, the Los Angeles Times reported. (The Hill)



WORLD VIEW

England is mandating face coverings in shops and supermarkets, government announced. After months of equivocation over mandating face coverings to stop the spread of the coronavirus, the government of Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain announced on Tuesday that people in England would be required to wear masks inside shops and supermarkets. (New York Times)

 

Masks and medical workers mix with a military parade at France’s Bastille Day celebration. France held a toned-down Bastille Day celebration Tuesday, with face masks and medical workers prominently visible amid the military pomp. French officials canceled the military parade held every year along the Champs-Élysées, the first cancellation since 1945, while only half the number of soldiers were permitted at a ceremony at the Place de la Concorde, France 24 reported. (Washington Post)



SCIENCE

Operation Warp Speed is pushing for COVID-19 therapeutics by early fall. New treatment options for COVID-19 could arrive months before even the most optimistic timeline for a vaccine, senior Trump administration officials said at a briefing Monday. But demand could outstrip supply if the pandemic continues to rage, creating a national tug of war over limited doses. (Washington Post)

 

Major coronavirus testing company says turnaround time averaging at least seven days. Quest Diagnostics, one of the companies performing a significant amount of the coronavirus testing in the U.S., said Monday that its average turnaround time for test results is at least seven days for most patients. The announcement illustrates how the spike in coronavirus cases is overwhelming the country’s testing capacity. (The Hill

 

3M partners with MIT on rapid, cheap antigen test. 3M and researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are partnering to produce a rapid, widely accessible coronavirus antigen test, the company announced. Rapid, affordable and accurate antigen tests could help quickly detect new infections and target public health interventions. (CNBC

 

Researchers report the first case of the virus transmitted to a baby during pregnancy. Researchers are reporting what they say is the first confirmed case of the virus being transmitted during pregnancy from a woman to her baby. The baby, born in a Paris hospital in March, developed symptoms of inflammation in his brain, but recovered without treatment, said Daniele De Luca, who led the research team and is chief of the division of pediatrics and neonatal critical care at Paris Saclay University Hospitals. (New York Times)



BUSINESS

Analysis finds 5.5M have lost health insurance amid pandemic. Nearly 5.5 million people who lost their jobs between February and May of this year also lost their health insurance, according to a new analysis released Tuesday. The analysis from Families USA, a consumer health care advocacy organization, finds that the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis have caused the greatest health insurance losses in American history. (The Hill)



ISSUES, CAUSES, PASSIONS

Coronavirus will erase progress in gender equality unless we act now. Media articles about the dire child care situation for working parents have been popping up. Some speak to parental exhaustion. Some highlight the unequal burden carried by mothers. Yet we are still faced with a lack of concrete solutions to mitigate the gender inequalities this pandemic has exposed. I am worried about the children, but I am also worried about the echoing silence of the impending impact on the careers of women as they “lean out” to care for children during this national crisis. (Misty Heggeness for The Hill

 

We ran the CDC. No president ever politicized its science the way Trump has. As America begins the formidable task of getting our kids back to school and all of us back to work safely amid a pandemic that is only getting worse, public health experts face two opponents: COVID-19, but also political leaders and others attempting to undermine the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the debate last week around reopening schools more safely showed, these repeated efforts to subvert sound public health guidelines introduce chaos and uncertainty while unnecessarily putting lives at risk. (Former CDC Directors Tom Frieden, Jeffrey Koplan, David Satcher and Richard Besser for The Washington Post)



GENEROUS SPIRITS

Nonprofit donates wedding dresses to health care workers on pandemic front lines. Registered nurse Nicole Harris, a bride-to-be receiving a donated wedding dress, and Heidi Janson, founder of Brides Across America, join “Fox & Friends.” Watch the heartwarming interview here.



ICYMI: STEVE’S INTERVIEWS, 15 MINUTES EACH

> Steve interviews The Hill’s REID WILSON 

> Steve interviews Washington, D.C., Mayor MURIEL BOWSER 

> Steve interviews American Federation of Teachers President RANDI WEINGARTEN 

> Steve interviews NIAID Director ANTHONY FAUCI

> Steve interviews former New Jersey Gov. CHRIS CHRISTIE 


Watch all Coronavirus Report interviews here.



YOUR WORLD, YOUR STORIES

SEND US YOUR OWN PICS – from your own walks or adventures – during this time of physical distancing but social connection. And SEND US YOUR STORIES of how teleworking is going, what you have learned from homeschooling, new ways to exercise, and special moments or standout heroism you want to share. What’s working for you? What’s comic in these dark days? 

 

Send to YourStories@TheHill.com. Our thoughts are with you, our readers, and we hope and trust that no matter the weight of burdens on you now — and it’s not a good story for everyone we know — that we all stand together, resilient and confident, on the other side of this. There will be another side.



Click here to subscribe to The Hill’s Coronavirus Report

Click here to subscribe to our Overnight Healthcare Newsletter to stay up-to-date on all things coronavirus



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