Women protected longer than men after receiving Pfizer vaccine: research

Women protected longer than men after receiving Pfizer vaccine: research
© Getty

A new study has found that women who received both shots of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine generally have a higher level of protection against the coronavirus than men who received the vaccine. 

The study by the New England Journal of Medicine surveyed 4,800 vaccinated health care professionals in Israel from December to July. The results showed that by the end of the study, women 65 years or older had a higher antibody count than men in the same age range, at 46 percent compared to 37 percent. 

The results also showed that although antibodies against the coronavirus fell for both sexes up to 80 days after receiving the second dose, women still had higher counts of antibodies at their peak level of protection.

Another report published Monday in The Lancet medical journal that found the efficacy of the Pfizer vaccine decreased below 50 percent following about six months after receiving the second dose. 

The study comes just weeks after the Food and Drug Administration authorized booster shots of the Pfizer vaccine for people 65 and older as well as for those with a higher risk of becoming seriously ill. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week also issued an advisory "strongly" urging pregnant women to get vaccinated as part of a push to combat misinformation that is contributing to low vaccination rates among women who are pregnant or who are trying to get pregnant.