Boehner's closing argument: 'Americans haven’t experienced change promised'

House Republican leader Rep. John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner says it's Democrats' turn for a Tea Party movement House Republicans find silver lining in minority Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history MORE (Ohio) said Americans “haven’t experienced the change President Obama promised” as he delivered what amounts to the GOP’s closing argument days before the midterm elections.

“In the final days of the 2008 campaign, Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaWhat should Democrats do next, after Mueller's report? Jennifer Lopez and Alex Rodriguez's engagement win Obama's endorsement Pence lobbies anti-Trump donors to support reelection: report MORE promised to ‘change this country and change the world.’ Well I don’t know about the world, but here at home, Americans haven’t experienced the change President Obama promised,” BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner says it's Democrats' turn for a Tea Party movement House Republicans find silver lining in minority Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history MORE said in the Republican weekly address on Saturday.

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“One in ten of our fellow citizens is out of work. Our national debt has grown by $3 trillion. Trust in government has fallen to an all-time low.

“Now these problems didn’t start under President Obama,” Boehner said. “But instead of fixing them, his policies have made them worse.”

In all likelihood, Boehner would become Speaker if Republicans win control of the House after Tuesday, as many analysts now expect them to do.

Criticizing the stimulus package, the healthcare law and a cap-and-trade energy bill that was never enacted, Boehner said that “Americans are demanding a new way forward in Washington – an approach that neither party has tried.”


He touted the GOP’s “Pledge to America,” saying Congress needs to reduce spending and prevent a tax hike by extending the George W. Bush-era tax cuts.

While Boehner said a new GOP Congress would mark a departure from the Obama agenda, he also acknowledged voter dissatisfaction with Republicans, saying a renewed focus on cutting spending would be “a break from the direction in which Republicans were headed when Americans last entrusted us with the reins of government.”