Boehner nominates Secret Service official for House Sergeant at Arms

House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock From learning on his feet to policy director MORE (R-Ohio) announced Monday he plans to nominate a former top Secret Service official to the position of House Sergeant at Arms.

Paul Irving, former Assistant Director for Administration, would replace outgoing Sergeant at Arms Bill Livingood, who earlier this month announced his plans to retire in January.

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“Paul Irving’s 25-year career in the U.S. Secret Service earned him the strongest possible recommendations for this important post,” wrote BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock From learning on his feet to policy director MORE in a statement Monday. “His high level federal law enforcement experience, including a number of assignments working closely with the Congress, will be invaluable to the House.”

Irving, 54, began his law enforcement career as a clerk in the FBI’s Los Angeles field office, joining the Secret Service as a special agent in 1983. He was detailed to the Executive Office of the President as a core member of the White House transition team responsible for assembling the Department of Homeland Security in 2003, according to the statement.

Irving would succeed Livingood to become the 37th Sergeant at Arms of the House. Livingood held the position for 17 years, following 33 years in the Secret Service.

The House Sergeant at Arms, along with his Senate counterpart, oversees the United States Capitol Police and is responsible for the safety and security of all lawmakers, congressional staff and visitors to the Capitol Complex, the release added.

According to Boehner’s office, the House will vote to elect Livingood’s successor to the position on Jan. 17, the opening day of the second session of the 112th Congress.