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10 freshmen who could trouble leadership

10 freshmen who could trouble leadership

House Republicans will have their largest majority since the 1930s next year, but that doesn't mean Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerWarren, Brown voice support for controversial Biden budget office pick Principles to unify America Feehery: A possible House Speaker conundrum for Democrats MORE's (R-Ohio) job will be easy.

The House GOP leadership's struggles in keeping members in line over the past four years have been well documented. Some of the incoming freshmen will likely join the ranks of conservatives who frequently oppose leadership initiatives.

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Among the new freshmen, for instance, is one congressman-elect who has called Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Katko fends off Democratic opponent in New York race Harris County GOP chairman who made racist Facebook post resigns MORE the "anti-Christ," another who has suggested Muslims don't deserve First Amendment rights, and yet another who has declared himself open to the idea of the United States invading Mexico. 

Here are 10 new freshmen who swell the far-right’s numbers, including several who will replace members upon whom the House GOP leadership was normally able to rely.

1. Glenn GrothmanGlenn S. GrothmanHopes and fears for religious freedom in Vietnam GOP lawmakers comply with Pelosi's mask mandate for House floor GOP-Trump fractures on masks open up MORE (R-Wis.). Grothman will be replacing Rep. Tom PetriThomas (Tom) Evert PetriKeep our elections free and fair Break the cycle of partisanship with infant, child health care programs Combine healthcare and tax reform to bring out the best in both MORE (R-Wis.), a reliable supporter of the leadership. Grothman is likely to be anything but that. The conservative firebrand has called for eliminating Kwanzaa — a holiday he says "almost no black people today care about" — and the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. As if that were not enough, he has also accused the federal government of waging a "war on men" by promoting affirmative action.  

2. Barry Loudermilk (R-Ga.). Loudermilk has stated plainly he will not support BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerWarren, Brown voice support for controversial Biden budget office pick Principles to unify America Feehery: A possible House Speaker conundrum for Democrats MORE for Speaker. He has also generated headlines for suggesting that President Obama deserves to be impeached, though he acknowledged that he didn't think the idea would be worth pursuing if it would not succeed. In addition, Loudermilk sponsored legislation in the Georgia state Senate to prevent illegal immigrants from obtaining marriage licenses, attending state colleges or accessing water and sewage services.

3. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceHillicon Valley: Department of Justice sues Google | House Republicans push for tech bias hearing | Biden drawing more Twitter engagement for first time House Republicans push VA for details on recent data breach IRS closes in on final phase of challenging tax season MORE (R-Ga.). Hice, a radio talk-show host, has expressed a desire for "new leadership with a backbone" instead of Boehner. He has also asserted that it is acceptable for a woman to hold political power if she is "within the authority of her husband." Hice further suggested in his 2012 book "It's Now or Never: A Call to Reclaim America" that Muslims don't deserve First Amendment rights because Islam is "a complete geo-political structure."

4. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerNorth Carolina's Mark Walker expected to announce Senate bid Lara Trump mulling 2022 Senate run in North Carolina: report House GOP votes to keep leaders in place MORE (R-N.C.). Walker generated headlines by suggesting that the U.S. invade Mexico to limit the stream of undocumented immigrants crossing the southwestern border. "Well, we did it before. If we need to do it again, I don’t have a qualm about it," Walker said about going to war with Mexico.

5. Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Interior shortlist puts focus on New Mexico lawmakers | Progressives criticize Biden transition over volunteer who represented Exxon | Trump DOJ appointees stalled investigation into Zinke: report Trump DOJ appointees stalled investigation into Zinke: report GOP Rep. Greg Gianforte wins Montana governor's race MORE (R-Mont.). Back in January, Zinke declared during a campaign stop that Hillary Clinton was the "anti-Christ." On the same occasion, he insisted that "We need to focus on the real enemy," apparently in reference to Clinton. Zinke will replace Sen.-elect Steve DainesSteven (Steve) David DainesRick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Biden eyes new leadership at troubled public lands agency OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight MORE (R-Mont.), another member whom leadership could typically count on.

6. Gary PalmerGary James PalmerAlabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future House GOP votes to keep leaders in place Comer tapped to serve as top Republican on House Oversight MORE (R-Ala.). Palmer, who is replacing leadership ally Rep. Spencer BachusSpencer Thomas BachusManufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank Biz groups take victory lap on Ex-Im Bank On The Money: White House files notice of China tariff hikes | Dems cite NYT report in push for Trump tax returns | Trump hits Iran with new sanctions | Trump praises GM for selling shuttered Ohio factory | Ex-Im Bank back at full strength MORE (R-Ala.), stated early in his campaign that he would not support Boehner for Speaker because he thinks the Ohio Republican has "lost his legitimacy to lead." But Palmer said last month that he regrets, "to a certain extent," making that pledge because it could compromise his ability to secure plum committee assignments. Palmer said he explained his rationale in a conversation with Boehner: "I told him, I said that I want you to know right now that if I tell you I'll do something, you can count on it, and I'm going to prove it to you by not voting for you."

7. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeProfiles in cowardice: Trump's Senate enablers Biden considering King for director of national intelligence: report Haspel not in attendance at latest Trump intelligence briefing: reports MORE (R-Texas). Ratcliffe defeated Rep. Ralph HallRalph Moody HallJohn Ratcliffe is the right choice for director of national intelligence — and for America Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Former Texas GOP Rep. Ralph Hall dead at 95 MORE (R-Texas), currently the oldest sitting member of Congress, in a primary earlier this year. He said repeatedly over the course of his campaign that he was undecided about whether to support Boehner for Speaker. Ratcliffe has also blamed the leadership for the Republican Party's shortcomings. "I have said pretty candidly that I think some of the problems we’ve had have been failures of GOP leadership. I’m not going to back away from that," Ratcliffe said.

8. Dave Brat (R-Va.). Brat, a Randolph-Macon College economics professor, delivered perhaps the biggest political upset of the year when he toppled former House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorSpanberger's GOP challenger raises over .8 million in third quarter The Hill's Campaign Report: Florida hangs in the balance Eric Cantor teams up with former rival Dave Brat in supporting GOP candidate in former district MORE (R-Va.) in the June GOP primary. His victory came partly by accusing Cantor of being "pro-amnesty" on immigration. Brat has also declined to say whether he'll support Boehner for Speaker.

9. French HillJames (French) French HillDemocrats projected to retain House majority Live updates: Democrats seek to extend House advantage Cook Political Report shifts 8 more House races toward Democrats MORE (R-Ark.). When asked at a June forum if he would oppose future government shutdowns, Hill suggested such events weren't so out of the ordinary. "First of all, government shutdowns have been sort of a part of the tension between the executive branch and the legislative branch for decades," Hill said. "So it's not always something that's a partisan issue, there's a constructive tension between the executive and the legislative."

10. Tom EmmerThomas (Tom) Earl EmmerVoters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican A louder voice for women everywhere GOP sees path to House majority in 2022 MORE (R-Minn.). Emmer will replace retiring Rep. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannEvangelicals shouldn't be defending Trump in tiff over editorial Mellman: The 'lane theory' is the wrong lane to be in White House backs Stephen Miller amid white nationalist allegations MORE (R-Minn.), a Tea Party star who frequently defied the GOP leadership. Emmer was known as a conservative firebrand in the Minnesota state House and proposed a state constitutional amendment in 2010 while running for governor that would only have allowed federal laws to be implemented in Minnesota if supermajorities in the state legislature approved them. While Emmer ran a more toned-down congressional campaign this year, he's still worth watching. He represents the most conservative district in his state.