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Chaffetz succeeds Issa on Oversight

Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzEric Trump blasts professor at alma mater Georgetown: ‘A terrible representative for our school’ Matt Schlapp: Trump's policies on Russia 'two or three times tougher than anything' under Obama Tucker Carlson: Ruling class cares more about foreigners than their own people MORE (R-Utah) on Tuesday won a competitive four-way race to become the House Oversight Committee chairman in the new Congress starting in January.

Chaffetz and Reps. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), Mike Turner (R-Ohio) and John Mica (R-Fla.) vied to succeed current Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who is term-limited, for the high-profile gavel.

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All four candidates emphasized throughout their candidacies that they'd try to run the committee differently from Issa's controversial tenure.

Over the course of the last two days, the House GOP Steering Committee, a panel consisting of elected leadership, top committee chairmen and regional representatives that determines gavel assignments, interviewed candidates and voted on who should win the chairmanships.

Oversight was the most contested race this year.

Two of the candidates, Jordan and Turner, hailed from Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Citi — House postpones Rosenstein meeting | Trump hits Dems over Medicare for all | Hurricane Michael nears landfall Kavanaugh becomes new flashpoint in midterms defined by anger Juan Williams: The GOP can't govern MORE's (R-Ohio) home state, inserting another wrench into the mix.

Ranking committee member Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) congratulated Chaffetz and said he's looking forward to collaborating with him.

"I am encouraged that Rep. Chaffetz has shown a sincere interest in working together and focusing on reform, and I hope this bipartisanship continues," Cummings said.

Issa became well known for conducting aggressive hearings and clashing with Democrats, particularly during the contempt of Congress proceedings against Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderFormer Clinton aide Reines: ‘Party of snowflakes’ suddenly remodeled as 'angry mob of terrorists’ Noisy democracy, or rude people behaving like children? Georgia gubernatorial candidate calls Holder comments on kicking Republicans ‘hyperbole’ MORE and the investigation of the Sept. 11, 2012 attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

The California Republican went as far as cutting off Cummings's (D-Md.) microphone during a March hearing on the IRS.

Meanwhile, Rep. Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Paul Ryan to campaign for 25 vulnerable House Republicans GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE (R-Wisc.), the current Budget Committee chairman and 2012 vice presidential candidate, has taken the Ways and Means Committee chairmanship, besting Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyOvernight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Some ObamaCare premiums to decrease next year | Sanders hits back at Trump over 'Medicare for all' | Panel to investigate rising maternal mortality rates House committee to investigate rising maternal mortality rates How the Trump tax law passed: The final stretch MORE (R-Texas).

Brady, always a long shot, withdrew his candidacy late Tuesday in a concession to Ryan, who has described the post as his dream job.

BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Citi — House postpones Rosenstein meeting | Trump hits Dems over Medicare for all | Hurricane Michael nears landfall Kavanaugh becomes new flashpoint in midterms defined by anger Juan Williams: The GOP can't govern MORE also made select appointments for two House committees. Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.) will lead the Ethics Committee, while Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) will take over the Intelligence Committee.

Nunes's selection came over two high-profile competitors: House Veterans' Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller (R-Fla.) and former House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Peter King (R-N.Y.).

Rep. Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) confirmed to The Hill Tuesday evening that he had been selected as the new House Armed Services Committee chairman.

Thornberry was widely considered to become the next chairman of the House Armed Services Committee despite a late challenge from Rep. Randy ForbesJames (Randy) Randy ForbesToo much ‘can do,’ not enough candor Trump makes little headway filling out Pentagon jobs Why there's only one choice for Trump's Navy secretary MORE (R-Va.). The retiring chairman, Buck McKeon (R-Calif.), implicitly endorsed Thornberry, who has served as the panel’s second-ranking Republican for the last four years.