Sen. Orrin Hatch to take Biden's seat during Netanyahu address

Sen. Orrin Hatch to take Biden's seat during Netanyahu address
© Greg Nash

Sen. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchTrump holds more Medal of Freedom ceremonies than predecessors but awards fewer medals Trump to award Medal of Freedom to former Attorney General Edwin Meese Trump to award racing legend Roger Penske with Presidential Medal of Freedom MORE (R-Utah) will take Vice President Biden's place beside Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerIs Congress retrievable? Boehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader MORE (R-Ohio) when Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses Congress next month.

Biden’s office on Friday said he will be traveling out of the country at the time of Netanyahu's address, which means the ceremonial duties will fall to Hatch, who is the president pro tempore of the Senate, GOP aides said.

The image of BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerIs Congress retrievable? Boehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush Meadows to be replaced by Biggs as Freedom Caucus leader MORE and Hatch behind the Israeli leader will underscore the divide between Republicans and Democrats over the controversial address.

ADVERTISEMENT

Boehner arranged the March 3 speech without consulting first with the Obama administration — a move the White House and congressional Democrats have complained was a breach of diplomatic protocol.

A growing list of Democratic lawmakers, including Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), have said they will skip the speech in protest of how it was handled.

In addition, both President Obama and Secretary of State John KerryJohn Forbes KerryHe who must not be named: How Hunter Biden became a conversation-stopper Rep. Joe Kennedy has history on his side in Senate bid Green groups line up behind Markey ahead of looming Kennedy fight MORE have said they will not meet with Netanyahu during his trip to Washington because the visit falls just two weeks before the Israeli elections.

Speeches by foreign heads of state are usually attended by the vice president, who sits on the House rostrum in his role as president of the Senate.

Hatch's nearly 40 years in the upper chamber make him the most senior Republican senator. When Republicans seized the majority last month, he became president pro tempore, putting him third in line to the presidency behind only Biden and Boehner.

The Utah senator is also chairman of the powerful Finance Committee.

Having the pro tempore fill in for the vice president isn’t unprecedented. In March 2011, then-pro tempore Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) was seated on the Speaker’s rostrum next to Boehner when Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard addressed a joint session of Congress. Biden also was traveling abroad that time as well.