Boehner names GOP conferees on stalled Violence Against Women Act

Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner says it's Democrats' turn for a Tea Party movement House Republicans find silver lining in minority Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history MORE (R-Ohio) on Monday named Republican negotiators on the long-stalled reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, hoping to launch a House-Senate conference committee two-and-a-half months after the House passed its version.

The Speaker’s announcement is the first sign of movement on the legislation in weeks, but whether it will lead to substantive action before the November elections is unclear. The House and Senate are just days away from a five-week congressional recess.

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“Completing work on legislation to renew and strengthen the Violence Against Women Act is critical in our efforts to combat domestic violence and sexual assault,” BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBoehner says it's Democrats' turn for a Tea Party movement House Republicans find silver lining in minority Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history MORE said in a statement. “The law has broad, bipartisan support in both chambers, and I’m announcing our negotiators today in the hopes that we can begin to resolve the differences between the House and Senate bills.

"The House is ready and willing to begin those discussions," he continued, "and I would urge Senate Democrats to come to the table so this critical legislation can be sent to the president for his signature as soon as possible.”

In late April, the Senate passed a reauthorization of the bill with bipartisan support on a vote of 68-31. The House followed with its own bill three weeks later, but Senate leaders dismissed the lower chamber’s version as inadequate because it lacked specific measures for Native American, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and immigrant victims of domestic violence. A top Senate Democrat, Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayWhite House proposes limits on student loan borrowing as part of higher education reforms Jury orders Johnson & Johnson to pay M to woman who claimed baby powder gave her cancer Overnight Health Care - Presented by Kidney Care Partners - FDA chief Scott Gottlieb resigns | House Dems to take up drug pricing bills next week | Planned Parenthood, doctors group sue over Trump abortion rule MORE (Wash.), has said she would not compromise on those provisions.

House leaders have called on the Senate to fix its own bill because it raises revenue, and measures that raise revenue must originate in the House.

A House GOP leadership aide said that position has not changed.

“Given that the Senate-passed bill is unconstitutional, the best way to proceed is for the Senate to fix their mistake, and go to conference,” the aide said. “In light of the heated rhetoric from Senate Democrats on this issue, if they do not agree to go to conference, it will seem they are more interested in exploiting this issue for partisan gain than getting a bill done.”

A spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidBernie campaign 2.0 - he's in it to win it, this time around Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ Senate confirms Trump court pick despite missing two 'blue slips' MORE (D-Nev.) did not immediately return a request for comment.

The House conferees that Boehner named are Reps. Sandy Adams (Fla.), the bill’s chief sponsor, Mary Bono Mack (Calif.), Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyTop Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview Gowdy calls congressional hearings like Cohen's 'utterly useless' The family secret Bruce Ohr told Rod Rosenstein about Russia case MORE (S.C.), Nan Hayworth (N.Y.), Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration GOP pushes back on net neutrality bill at testy hearing Hillicon Valley: Dems renew fight over net neutrality | Zuckerberg vows more 'privacy-focused' Facebook | House Dems focus on diversity in Silicon Valley | FBI chief warns of new disinformation campaigns MORE (Wash.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoPence, GOP senators discuss offer to kill Trump emergency disapproval resolution Bipartisan think tank to honor lawmakers who offer 'a positive tenor' Trump tries to win votes in Senate fight MORE (W. Va.), James Sensenbrenner Jr. (Wis.), and Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith (Texas).