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Black lawmaker PAC backs Clinton

Black lawmaker PAC backs Clinton
© Greg Nash

The Congressional Black Caucus's Political Action Committee endorsed Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary and Chelsea Clinton to host series based on their book 'Gutsy Women' Democrats see spike in turnout among Asian American, Pacific Islander voters Biden officially announces ex-Obama official Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE on Thursday in a move that could help the White House hopeful ahead of the Feb. 27 Democratic South Carolina primary.

CBC Chairman G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldBickering Democrats return with divisions Congress must protect kidney disease patients during the COVID-19 pandemic The time for HELP is now: Senate should pass bill to expedite recovery following natural disasters MORE (D-N.C.) described the vote by the political action committee's board for Clinton as “overwhelming and near unanimous.”

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“We must have a president who is knowledgeable on both domestic and foreign policy. Our new president must understand that too many Americans languish in persistent poverty every day,” he told reporters at a press conference at the Democratic National Committee headquarters.

“There is no question in my mind and in our mind that one single candidate, one, possesses the qualifications, experience and temperament to be the next president of the United States and that person is none other than Sec. Hillary Rodham Clinton.”

The former secretary of State is seeking to rebound from her Tuesday defeat to Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Sanders press secretary: 'Principal concern' of Biden appointments should be policy DeVos knocks free college push as 'socialist takeover of higher education' The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Capital One — Giuliani denies discussing preemptive pardon with Trump MORE (I-Vt.) in New Hampshire with wins in the Nevada caucuses on Feb. 20, and then in South Carolina’s primary.

Black voters will be a force in South Carolina, and Clinton and Sanders have been battling to win over African-Americans in recent weeks.

That fight is intensifying after the New Hampshire results.

Clinton is seen as having a huge advantage over Sanders in terms of black support; about 10 black lawmakers attended the press conference.

Rep. Keith EllisonKeith EllisonProgressives unveil Biden Cabinet wish list Officers involved with George Floyd killing will stand trial together in Minneapolis, judge decides Trump lashes out at state officials over virus restrictions at Minnesota rally MORE (D-Minn.), a CBC member who has endorsed Sanders, emphasized on Twitter that the PAC's endorsement is separate from the CBC coalition of members in Congress, which hasn't endorsed.

And he noted that the endorsement came from its board without consultation from CBC membership.

Clinton surrogates in a Tuesday call argued that Sanders has not been as active in fighting racial injustice as Sanders, and sought to portray him as “absent” on those issues.  

“To be very frank, I never saw him, I never met him,” said Rep. John LewisJohn LewisKwanza Hall wins race to briefly succeed John Lewis in Congress Congress must act to protect and expand Social Security benefits Ossoff features Obama in TV ad ahead of Georgia runoff MORE, the Georgia Democrat and civil rights figure.

“I chaired the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee for three years, from 1963-1966. I was involved in sit-ins, Freedom Rides, the March on Washington, the March from Selma to Montgomery ... but I met Hillary Clinton, I met President Clinton.”

--Updated at 3:30 p.m.