Pelosi and Hoyer keeping an open mind to cuts to entitlement programs

House Democratic leaders have softened their blanket opposition to Social Security cuts in a “fiscal-cliff” package despite an outpouring of anger from rank-and-file members.

Democratic leaders are keeping an open mind after President Obama proposed to cut inflationary increases in Social Security payments in his latest offer to Republicans, with some saying they’d support such reductions if the most vulnerable beneficiaries are protected. 

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“The Democrats will stick with the president,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said Tuesday when asked about the Social Security provisions on MSNBC.

Pelosi emphasized that the details of the plan “are not all ironed out,” and acknowledged that “maybe not every single [Democrat]” would support it. But she expressed confidence that an agreement backed by Obama — if it protected the oldest and the poorest — would win significant support from her troops.

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) delivered a similar message Tuesday.

“Everybody needs to understand that nobody is going to be happy with every provision of a deal,” Hoyer warned. “Some members will have problems with some parts, but … if we get an agreement that the president can support, hopefully we can get a majority in the House — Republicans and Democrats — and [Speaker John] BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBreaking the impasse on shutdown, border security McCarthy, allies retaliate against Freedom Caucus leader House vote fails to quell storm surrounding Steve King MORE [R-Ohio] and the leader [Pelosi] and I will convince members that we ought to move forward.”


Hoyer added, “Affecting entitlements would not be our first choice, but then again, I don’t think you get there from here without dealing, in some respects, with entitlements.”

Many rank-and-file Democrats, however, are up in arms over the White House offer. The proposal comes weeks after both Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and White House press secretary Jay Carney suggested Social Security was off the table in the fiscal-cliff negotiations.

Emerging from a Democratic Caucus meeting Tuesday morning — where they were briefed on Obama’s plan by top White House adviser Rob Nabors — the Democrats pushed back hard against the president’s proposal to reduce future cost-of-living raises for Social Security recipients.

The change — known as the chained consumer price index (CPI) — is said to cut $130 billion in federal spending over a decade, and would include safeguards to protect the most vulnerable seniors. 

“I don’t like it at all,” said Rep. James McGovern (D-Mass.).

“A terrible idea,” said Rep. and Sen.-elect Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyDems demand answers following explosive new Cohen report Dem senators debate whether to retweet Cardi B video criticizing Trump over shutdown Cardi B expresses solidarity with federal workers not getting paid MORE (D-Conn.).

“We don’t like the chained CPI,” said Rep. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDems lash out at Trump for recalling furloughed workers Dems eye lawsuit if Trump declares border emergency The Hill's Morning Report — Groundhog Day: Negotiations implode as shutdown reaches 20 days MORE (D-Va.).

“We don’t like it,” said Rep. John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiPelosi pulls State of the Union surprise on Trump How Pelosi is punishing some critics while rewarding others Cicilline bows out of assistant leader race, paving path for Lujan MORE (D-Calif.). “Why are you hurting the vulnerable seniors?”

Any fiscal-cliff deal brokered between Boehner and Obama will need a significant amount of Democratic support to pass the House, because Tea Party lawmakers are expected to reject such an agreement.

Several Senate Democrats also hammered Obama’s chained CPI proposal Tuesday, with Sen. Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinHouse Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race Congress must use bipartisan oversight as the gold standard MORE (D-Mich.) saying the provision would be “a problem for Democrats”; Sen. Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinDC train system losing 0k per day during government shutdown IRS shutdown plan fails to quell worries GOP senators would support postponing State of the Union MORE (D-Md.) warning that he’ll “fight hard” to keep Social Security out of the fiscal-cliff package; and Sen. Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) saying the White House move “doesn’t warm my heart.”

“I don’t care if they spread it over a whole bunch of years. The whole understanding has been that we wouldn’t do Social Security,” Rockefeller said. “That was for later.”

A day after the election, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidSenate Republicans eye rules change to speed Trump nominees Harry Reid knocks Ocasio-Cortez's tax proposal: Fast 'radical change' doesn't work Overnight Defense: Trump rejects Graham call to end shutdown | Coast Guard on track to miss Tuesday paychecks | Dems eye Trump, Russia probes | Trump talks with Erdogan after making threat to Turkey's economy MORE (D-Nev.) said, “We are not going to mess with Social Security.”

Obama first embraced the CPI change and raising the Medicare eligibility age in his 2011 negotiations with Boehner on a grand bargain on taxes and spending. Those talks subsequently fell apart.

Both Hoyer and Pelosi said changes to Social Security updates would be much easier for Democrats to swallow than proposals to raise the eligibility age for Medicare.

“The age limit is much more sensitive,” Hoyer said.

Rep. Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraDem added to Ways and Means Committee amid desire for more Hispanic members Judge blocks Trump contraception rule in 13 states Overnight Health Care: Judge pauses ObamaCare appeal amid shutdown | Trump officials consider Medicaid block grants for states | HHS closing tent city for migrant teens MORE (Calif.), vice chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, has for weeks attacked efforts to cut Social Security as part of the fiscal-cliff talks — including the move to chained CPI. But he moderated his tone sharply on Tuesday, being careful not to attack Obama’s chained CPI proposal directly.

“The president has, all the way through this, tried to come up with a plan that … would be balanced and would address our deficits and still let us move forward with creating jobs,” Becerra said. “Many of us still have faith that the president will ultimately — if he strikes a deal with the Republicans — give us a plan that we can vote on that provides that fairness and that balance. What the actual elements will be? It’s unclear.”

Rep. John Larson (Conn.), the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, has also attacked proposed cuts to Social Security benefits. But on Tuesday, he likewise declined to go after Obama’s proposal, saying he’s still waiting for details.

“We didn’t get into that kind of discussion” with Nabors, he said. “All of you can generally surmise what people in the caucus would have to say about that. But until there’s any kind of concrete proposal … it seems like a moving target, so [there’s] not really much we can comment on there. 

“We continue to stand with the president on a fair and balanced proposal that has to accomplish the goals that he has outlined,” Larson added.

Liberal Democrats and advocacy groups, meanwhile, are racing furiously to prevent the chained CPI from making its way into a final deal. The Progressive Change Campaign Committee blasted an email Tuesday with warnings that such a shift would weaken Social Security for everyone.

“A move toward chained CPI,” said Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.), “would be a long-term benefit cut for every single person who receives a Social Security check.”

Bernie Becker, Peter Schroeder and Erik Wasson contributed.