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Ryan: ‘No evidence’ of mass voter fraud as Trump claimed

House Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPelosi and Trump go a full year without speaking Jordan vows to back McCarthy as leader even if House loses more GOP seats Barrett declines to say if Trump can pardon himself MORE reiterated Tuesday that he’s seen “no evidence” of rampant voter fraud during the 2016 election.

The Wisconsin Republican’s remarks came one day after President Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE told Ryan and other congressional leaders during a private White House meeting that he lost the popular vote only because 3 million to 5 million “illegals” voted.

“I’ve seen no evidence to that effect. I’ve made that very, very clear,” Ryan told reporters at the Capitol, reiterating his position on Trump’s claim of mass voter fraud. 

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Trump won the White House in November by easily defeating Democrat Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonLate night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study 10 steps toward better presidential debating Continuity is (mostly) on the menu for government contracting in the next administration MORE in the Electoral College, 304 to 227. But Clinton won the popular tally by taking home nearly 3 million more votes than Trump nationwide. 

That's been a sore subject for the new commander in chief. Shortly after his successful election, Trump tweeted: “In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.”

He rehashed that false claim — which has been dismissed by state officials and independent fact-checkers — at Monday’s bipartisan meet-and-greet with the top eight House and Senate lawmakers, according to two sources familiar with the White House discussion.

"He said 3 to 5 million 'illegals' voted so that's why he lost popular vote," said a Democratic aide.

Trump’s latest comments drew a stern rebuke from one former presidential rival, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election Biden and Schumer face battles with left if Democrats win big Push to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw MORE (R-S.C.), who urged him to stop claiming voter fraud cost him the popular vote.

“… I am begging the president, share with us the information you have about this or please stop saying it,” Graham said.

“As a matter of fact, I’d like you do more than stop saying it, I’d like you to come forward and say, ‘Having looked at it, I am confident the election was fair and accurate and people who voted voted legally.’ ‘Cause if he doesn’t do that, this is going to undermine his ability to govern this country.”