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GOP rep recounts using belt as tourniquet at baseball practice shooting

GOP rep recounts using belt as tourniquet at baseball practice shooting

Rep. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksTrump immigration measures struggle in the courts Latino groups intervene in Alabama census lawsuit Alabama GOP congressman preps possible Senate bid against Doug Jones MORE (R-Ala.) used his belt as a tourniquet to stop the bleeding of a staffer shot early Wednesday during a congressional baseball game practice, he told CNN shortly after the shooting. 

Brooks recounted the harrowing scene to the network after a gunman opened fire on Republicans practicing before the bipartisan Congressional Baseball Game, scheduled for Thursday. Multiple reports say House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) was shot in the hip and Capitol Hill police officers and other aides at the practice were also wounded by what Brooks said sounded like a semi-automatic weapon. 
 
After hiding in a batting cage, Brooks said he ran toward the cinderblock dugout for cover along the practice field's first base line for more protection. There, he found a group of staffers and congressmen attending to a staffer with a gunshot wound to his leg. 
 
"I took of my belt and myself and the other congressman, I don't remember who, applied a tourniquet to try to slow down the bleeding," Brooks said.   
 
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Brooks said law enforcement officers shot the gunman as the shooter was circling back toward where they were hiding. 
 
"Eventually, the shooter started circling around third base, this is my understanding. Of course, I'm down on the ground and helping the guy who has got a bullet hole in his leg," he said. 
 
"The shooter starts coming around home plate toward where we are, outside the fence line, and my understanding is that's where our security detail, maybe some of the ones who were wounded and still defending us, took him down."
 
Once they received the all clear, Brooks added, they ran to Scalise, who was down near second base. 
 
"We started giving him some liquids, I put pressure on his wound in his hip and Brad Wenstrup, a congressman from Ohio, Cincinnati, fortunately is a physician. He started doing what you need to do to try to minimize blood loss."
 
Wenstrup later told a CBS reporter that Scalise was “conscious and okay.”
 
Scalise is now in stable condition at a local hospital.
 
 
Alexandria, Va., police say that the shooter is in custody and is no longer a threat. Emergency officials are responding to the scene to attend to the wounded. 
 
--Ali Breland contributed to this report, which was updated at 9:10 a.m.