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Dem leaders amp up calls for bipartisan ObamaCare fixes

Dem leaders amp up calls for bipartisan ObamaCare fixes
© Greg Nash

Fueled by the Senate Republicans’ failure to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, Democrats are ramping up their calls for GOP leaders to reach across the aisle in search of bipartisan fixes to former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama: Republican Party members believe 'white males are victims' Texas warehouse where migrants housed in 'cages' closed for humane renovation North Carolina — still purple but up for grabs MORE’s signature domestic achievement.

“It's time to move on. It’s time to start over,” Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) said Tuesday morning on the chamber floor.

“Rather than repeating the same failed partisan process yet again, Republicans should work with Democrats on a bill that lowers premiums, provides long term stability to the markets and improves our healthcare system.”

Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Kerry says Paris climate deal alone 'is not enough' | EPA halts planned Taiwan trip for Wheeler| EPA sued over rule extending life of toxic coal ash ponds Overnight Energy: Biden names John Kerry as 'climate czar' | GM reverses on Trump, exits suit challenging California's tougher emissions standards | United Nations agency says greenhouse gas emissions accumulating despite lockdown decline GSA transition delay 'poses serious risk' to Native Americans, Udall says MORE (D- Del.) said he talked to Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynCornyn says election outcome 'becoming increasingly clear': report Top GOP senator: Biden should be getting intel briefings GOP senator congratulates Biden, says Trump should accept results MORE Tuesday morning about working together on a bipartisan fix to ObamaCare and will speak with other Republicans later in the day. 
 
"I thought there was a positive response. He's a good friend," Carper said. 
 
Carper and Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Rick Scott tests positive for coronavirus Grassley tests positive for coronavirus MORE (D-Va.) have a proposal that would move to stabilize the ObamaCare exchanges, similar to one proposed by House Democrats. 
 
"Members have ideas on healthcare," Carper said. "We should have bipartisan hearings, bipartisan roundtables, have markups and have a chance to vote on this stuff." 
 
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Republicans have, for nearly a decade, vowed to eliminate ObamaCare and replace it with more market-friendly provisions — a campaign message that resounded with voters and helped the Republicans win the House in 2010 and the Senate four years later. House Republicans on their second try passed such a bill in May, but two separate versions of that proposal have since failed to win enough Republican support to pass through the Senate.

Facing defeat, President Trump on Monday night called immediately for a Plan B: Repeal ObamaCare, he said, and replace it with separate reforms at a later date. That strategy has been endorsed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAs Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on Harris says she has 'not yet' spoken to Pence Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year MORE (R-Ky.), and Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) suggested Tuesday that such a bill could get a vote as early as this week.

But the strategy appears destined to fail, as three Republican senators have already come out against it. GOP leaders can afford only two defections in the upper chamber, which would then require Vice President Pence to break a 50-50 tie.

“I said back in January that if we're going to do a repeal, there has to be a replacement,” Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiTrump administration denies permit for controversial Pebble Mine Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (R-Alaska) said Tuesday, joining GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTwo more parting shots from Trump aimed squarely at disabled workers Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism The Memo: Trump election loss roils right MORE (Maine) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoAs Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE (W.Va.) in opposition.

“There's enough chaos and uncertainty already.”

 
"If we got to that place where we're off the repeal obsession and actually working on serious problems, which repeal makes everything worse, we should try to work on individual bills as opposed to broad, sweeping comprehensive bills," he said. 
  
Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) echoed his colleague, saying he hoped the failure of the GOP's repeal bill would lead to bipartisan talks. 
 
"McConnell said the failure of the repeal effort would mean you would have to come together and bolster the exchanges and talk about common ground, and that's where we should go." 

Some House Republicans were also quick to reject Trump’s new healthcare strategy.

Rep. Charlie Dent (R-Pa.), chairman of the Tuesday Group of centrist House Republicans, led the opposition against his own party's repeal-and-replace effort and said a repeal-only strategy would speed up the collapse of the ObamaCare markets.

On Tuesday, Dent reiterated his call for a "bipartisan fix" for ObamaCare.

“I’ve always felt we've got to come up with a [centrist] proposal on healthcare," he told reporters. "Maybe that was not popular at the time, but it may be the only option available at this moment."

House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) on Tuesday predicted the repeal-only plan has no chance to pass and joined Schumer in urging GOP leaders to reach across the aisle to fix the problems in ObamaCare that even its most stalwart supporters acknowledge.

“They didn’t have a plan; they don’t have a replacement; and what they ought to be doing is working with us to improve the Affordable Care Act,” Hoyer told reporters in the Capitol. “We’re willing to do that; we’ve offered to do that; we want to do that; we believe it’s necessary to do that.”

Hoyer said GOP leaders have yet to reach out to any Democratic leaders in search of a bipartisan way forward.

“Nobody has invited me, [Nancy] Pelosi, [Frank] Pallone, [Richard] Neal, [Bobby] Scott or anybody else to sit down,” he said.

Hoyer rattled off a number of proposals he said would help stabilize ObamaCare, including measures ensuring enforcement of the individual and employer insurance mandates, guaranteeing the payment of subsidies to insurance companies that reduce health costs for low-income patients and propping up the individual market through market stabilization programs like reinsurance.

Some of those proposals were floated last week by a group of centrist and conservative-leaning House Democrats, who are hoping to jumpstart bipartisan talks by offering specific policy fixes — a push they’re accelerating in the wake of the Senate’s failure on repeal and replace.

Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDemocrats to determine leaders after disappointing election Shakespeare Theatre Company goes virtual for 'Will on the Hill...or Won't They?' Vermont Rep. Peter Welch easily wins primary MORE (D-Vt.), who is working on that effort, asked House Democrats Tuesday morning to sign on to the proposal and to reach out to Ryan. A Welch aide also said he is in private discussions with Republicans.
 
"We believe the time has come to work with the Republican conference to make bipartisan improvements to the Affordable Care Act’s individual market," Welch said in a 'dear colleague' message to Democrats. 

"Please join us in sending the below letter to Speaker Ryan urging him to work with us to stabilize and improve the individual market."

“Now is not the time for Republicans to double down on their partisan strategy, or for Democrats to high-five over the other side’s political disaster,” Rep. Scott Peters (D-Calif.), who’s leading the effort, said Tuesday in a statement.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanPaul Ryan calls for Trump to accept results: 'The election is over' Bottom line Democratic anger rises over Trump obstacles to Biden transition MORE (R-Wis.), however, seemed to throw cold water on the prospects of bipartisanship Tuesday, accusing the Democrats of wanting “to double-down on a failed system that is in the middle of a collapse” in their their defense of ObamaCare.

“I’m not going to foreclose any options,” Ryan said during a news briefing in the Capitol. “The challenge I see, though, is the Democrats have not been interested in working on this. They don't want to get us off of the ObamaCare train."

“If they want to get away from government-run healthcare, if they don't want to double-down on the failure of ObamaCare, then I think we have something to work with,” he added. “The problem is we just haven't seen any evidence of that yet.”

Hoyer later rejected the Speaker's comments.

“Democrats have said all along the ACA is not working perfectly, not working as well as we want, and we are willing to sit down and make it work well,” he said. “We are not prepared to support legislation which removes millions” of people from insurance coverage.

“We are prepared to look at Republican suggestions on how you make this work better.”

Jessie Hellmann and Scott Wong contributed to this report.

Updated 2:01 p.m.