GOP rep: ATF should re-evaluate bump stocks

GOP rep: ATF should re-evaluate bump stocks

Rep. Scott TaylorScott William TaylorEx-GOP Rep. Ryan Costello joins group pushing carbon tax Virginia New Members 2019 Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — First lady's office pushes for ouster of national security aide | Trump taps retired general as ambassador to Saudis | Mattis to visit border troops | Record number of female veterans to serve in Congress MORE (R-Va.) in an interview broadcast Sunday said the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) should re-evaluate bump stocks in the wake of last week’s mass shooting in Las Vegas.

“I think that should be re-evaluated,” Taylor told ABC News's “This Week” during an interview focusing on gun legislation with Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonDem lawmaker: 'Trump's presidency is the real national emergency' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - All eyes on Trump after lawmakers reach spending deal Overnight Defense: Acting Pentagon chief visits Afghanistan | US, Taliban peace talks intensify | Trump tweets in Persian to send message to Iran | Defense world pays tribute to Walter Jones MORE (D-Mass.).

“I’m not willing to impede on someone’s rights just because of emotional rhetoric,” Taylor said in the interview. 

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The conversation between the two congressmen comes amid an ongoing debate on the bump stock devices, which were found in the hotel room of the suspected Las Vegas shooter after the attack. The device can be used to increase the rate of fire in semi-automatic weapons.

The National Rifle Association (NRA) last week said bump stocks "should be subject to additional regulations," though it stopped short of calling for new legislation on guns.

“The NRA believes that devices designed to allow semi-automatic rifles to function like fully-automatic rifles should be subject to additional regulations,” the NRA said in a joint statement from CEO Wayne LaPierre and executive director of the NRA Institute for Legislative Action Chris Cox. 

The ATF in 2010 declared that bump stocks were considered a part and did not require regulation like a weapon.