The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill

The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill
© The Hill

House Republicans are voting Thursday on a tax overhaul package and appear to have the votes needed.

The bill would slash corporate tax rates, reduce some individual rates for middle class families and eliminate or scale back some popular breaks.

Republicans from high-tax states like New York and California are worried about cutting back state and local tax deductions and limiting the property tax deduction to $10,000.

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Assuming all Democrats vote against the GOP bill, Republican leaders can afford no more than 22 defections.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

RECENT UPDATES: REPS. DAN DONOVAN (R-N.Y.), John FasoJohn James FasoThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority GOP House super PAC targets two freshman Dems with new ads Tax law failed to save GOP majority MORE (R-N.Y.).

This list was last updated on Nov. 16 at 9:43 a.m.

 

NO (10)

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Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — Donovan announced he will join a news conference Nov. 16 to voice opposition to the House bill on the day of the vote.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.) — Like Donovan, Faso is set to take part in a Nov. 16 press conference to highlight his opposition to the GOP bill.

Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaWhy the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy Elijah Cummings, native son of Baltimore, gets emotional send-off from Democratic luminaries Lawmakers come together to honor Cummings: 'One of the greats in our country's history' MORE (Calif.)  Issa told reporters he cannot vote for bill in its current form. The measure on state and local tax deductions would hit affluent states like California hard.

Rep. Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesRepublican Greg Murphy wins special election in NC's 3rd District Early voting extended in NC counties impacted by Dorian ahead of key House race The Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina special election poses test for GOP ahead of 2020 MORE (N.C.) — Jones, who frequently bucks House leadership, told The Hill he is a "no" because the bill raises the deficit.

Rep. Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingHouse panel advances flavored e-cigarette ban Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches The Hill's Morning Report - Witness transcripts plow ground for public impeachment testimony MORE (N.Y.) — King on ABC’s "This Week" said he is a "no" vote unless the state and local tax deduction is put back in.

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceGun debate to shape 2020 races GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs Bottom Line MORE (N.J.) — Lance is a "no." He cited changes to state and local income tax deductions.

Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoFormer GOP Rep. Costello launches lobbying shop Republicans plot comeback in New Jersey K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (N.J.) — "[T]he elimination of state and local income tax deductions and the $10,000 cap on property tax deductions would be detrimental to New Jersey residents," LoBiondo said in a statement. Separately, he announced he would retire at the end of this Congress.

Rep. Chris Smith (N.J.) —"While I believe Americans are overtaxed and need relief, I must vote 'no' this week on the tax bill, H.R. 1, because of its negative impact on New Jersey and my congressional district," he said in a statement Monday.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.) — The co-chairwoman of the moderate Tuesday Group told reporters she is a "no," according to Bloomberg. Stefanik voiced concerns about state and local taxes when the bill was introduced.

Rep. Lee Zeldin (N.Y.) — "We need to fix this State and Local Tax deduction issue," the New York lawmaker said in a statement.

 

UNDECIDED/UNCLEAR (11)

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon Hoyer: We are going to move as fast 'as the facts and truth dictate' on open hearings Conway spars with Wallace on whether White House will cooperate with impeachment inquiry after formal vote MORE (Mich.) — The Freedom Caucus member said it’s too early to know how the bill impacts his constituents. Amash voted "no" on the budget blueprint that opened the door to tax reform.

Rep. Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — Biggs told The Hill on Nov. 10 he's still undecided.

Rep. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockGun debate raises stakes in battle for Virginia legislature Progressives face steep odds in ousting incumbent Democrats K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (Va.) — "I'm still looking at it," Comstock said Nov. 2, the day the bill was introduced.

Rep. Ryan CostelloRyan Anthony CostellloFormer GOP Rep. Costello launches lobbying shop Head of Pennsylvania GOP resigns over alleged explicit texts Lobbying world MORE (Pa.)  Costello said he was still studying the bill on Nov. 2.

Rep. Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonFinancial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess GOP leaders struggle to contain conservative anger over budget deal MORE (Ohio) — The Freedom Caucus member is undecided. “#TaxReform that raises your taxes is the wrong direction. Still reviewing scenarios from the House and Senate bills," he tweeted Nov. 10.

Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentOvernight Health Care — Presented by Better Medicare Alliance — Federal judge blocks Trump from detaining migrant children indefinitely | Health officials tie vaping-related illnesses to 'Dank Vapes' brand | Trump to deliver health care speech in Florida The Hill's Morning Report — Mueller testimony gives Trump a boost as Dems ponder next steps The Hill's 12:30 Report: Muller testimony dominates Washington MORE (Pa.)  The chairman of the moderate Tuesday Group said he’s “still reviewing it,” but there is a need for tax reform.

Rep. Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Top House GOP appropriations staffer moves to lobbying shop Individuals with significant disabilities need hope and action MORE (N.J.) — The chairman of the Appropriations Committee and a vulnerable Republican told reporters on Friday he was “still looking at the 400-page bill.”

Rep. John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoProgressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements Democratic lawmakers call on Judiciary Committee to advance 'revenge porn' law Katie Hill resignation reignites push for federal 'revenge porn' law MORE (N.Y.) — Katko is reportedly undecided.

Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockSeveral GOP House members call to continue to withhold international conservation grants until oversight measures implemented Overnight Energy: Trump administration issues plan to reverse limits on logging in Tongass National Forest| Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records| Trump's plan to boost ethanol miffs corn groups and the fossil fuel industry Democrats inch closer to issuing subpoenas for Interior, EPA records MORE (Calif.) — A McClintock spokeswoman told Morning Consult on Nov. 8 that the lawmaker wanted to keep the state and local tax deductions and was waiting to see the final package.

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Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — Rohrabacher said on Nov. 13 he is still reviewing the bill.

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford is undecided. “I struggle with the degree of benefit that comes from lowering taxes on corporations but raising them on some individuals," he said on Nov. 14. “It’s just tough to get your arms around, particularly if you’re a deficit hawk.”

 

LEANING YES (5)

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — DesJarlais says he is “leaning "yes" but I’d like to see the finished product.”

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsDemocrats seize on new evidence in first public impeachment hearing House Republicans call impeachment hearing 'boring,' dismiss Taylor testimony as hearsay Key takeaways from first public impeachment hearing MORE (N.C.)  The Freedom Caucus chairman is leaning yes. He called the bill a "work in progress" on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday.

Rep. Ann Wagner (Mo.) — Wagner said she likes the “permanence” of many tax cuts in the bill but would like them to be retroactive for one year. She is close to leadership.

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Rep. Mark Walker (N.C.) — The chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee caucus has been very supportive of the tax effort. He said the tax bill “is extremely positive.”

Rep. Roger WilliamsJohn (Roger) Roger WilliamsLive coverage: Zuckerberg testifies before House on Facebook's Libra project Population shifts set up huge House battleground The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (Texas) — Williams said the bill is “on the right track,” but he has concerns about a provision on the deductibility of businesses’ interest expenses.

 

YES (45)

Rep. Jim Banks (Ind.) — The freshman lawmaker tells The Hill he is a "yes." 

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (Fla.) — Bilirakis told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Mike Bishop (Mich.) — Bishop voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackBottom line Overnight Health Care: Anti-abortion Democrats take heat from party | More states sue Purdue over opioid epidemic | 1 in 4 in poll say high costs led them to skip medical care Lamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee MORE (Tenn.) ­— Black voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyLawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families How centrist Dems learned to stop worrying and love impeachment On The Money: Senate passes first spending package as shutdown looms | Treasury moves to roll back Obama rules on offshore tax deals | Trade deal talks manage to weather Trump impeachment storm MORE (Texas) — Brady is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee and the architect of the bill.

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — “Leadership did a great job on this thing,” said Brat.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.) — The senior Ways and Means Committee member said the bill “cuts taxes for middle-class families as well as small businesses, simplifies a broken tax code and jump-starts the economy.”

Rep. Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddNorth Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats SEC reforms will save job creators time and money Girls Little League softball champions get invitation to White House MORE (N.C.)  “Since the beginning, I have asked three main questions: Will this bill cut taxes for the middle class; does this bill make our business climate competitive in the global economy; and does this bill simplify the tax filing process for people at home? The answer to all of these questions are ‘yes,’ ” he said in a statement.

Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy GOP senators balk at lengthy impeachment trial GOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week MORE (N.D.) — Cramer said he told the president he’s a "yes" on tax reform.

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloRepublicans can't exploit the left's climate extremism without a better idea Progressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign The Memo: Bad polls for Trump shake GOP MORE (Fla.) — Curbelo voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisNew hemp trade group presses lawmakers on immigration reform, regs Shimkus says he's reconsidering retirement Shimkus says he's been asked to reconsider retirement MORE (Ill.) — Davis, the new chairman of the Republican Main Street Caucus, told The Hill he will vote "yes."

Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump roasts Republicans at private fundraising event Trump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' MORE (Tenn.) — “I would hope it would be a big vote,” said Fleischmann.

Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (Ariz.) — Franks, a member of the Freedom Caucus, told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisHouse conservatives attempt to access closed-door impeachment hearing GOP lawmakers, states back gunmaker in Sandy Hook appeal Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess MORE (Md.)  He told The Hill he is a "yes" on Friday. His constituents could be heavily impacted by the changes to state and local tax deduction.

Rep. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingNorth Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps North Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats House committee advances measure taxing nicotine in vaping products MORE (N.C.) — Holding voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Lynn JenkinsLynn Haag JenkinsFormer GOP Rep. Costello launches lobbying shop Kansas Republican dropping Senate bid to challenge GOP rep Anti-corruption group hits Congress for ignoring K Street, Capitol Hill 'revolving door' MORE (Kan.) — Jenkins voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Sam JohnsonSamuel (Sam) Robert Johnson Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan Lobbying world Social Security is approaching crisis territory MORE (Texas) — Johnson voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceKeeping your national parks accessible even during a government shutdown Marijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump issues Taliban warning at Sept. 11 memorial MORE (Ohio) — Joyce told The Hill on Nov. 3 he is a "yes." The moderate Republican voted "no" on the ObamaCare repeal.

Rep. Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyAlcohol industry races to save tax break by year-end deadline Democrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive Genetic counselors save health care dollars when involved in the testing process MORE (Pa.) — Kelly voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaBipartisan group reveals agricultural worker immigration bill Republicans storm closed-door hearing to protest impeachment inquiry GOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall MORE (Calif.) — LaMalfa told Politico he backs the bill but expects changes in conference committee.

Rep. Tom MacArthurThomas (Tom) Charles MacArthurRepublicans plot comeback in New Jersey Republicans spend more than million at Trump properties The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (N.J.)  MacArthur was vocal about the state and local tax deduction but said Tuesday he would vote for the bill. The centrist said he was satisfied with a cap on those deductions.

Rep. Kenny MarchantKenny Ewell MarchantEthics sends memo to lawmakers on SCIF etiquette Ethics panel investigating Rep. Hastings over relationship with staffer GOP Rep. Gaetz calls for ethics investigation into Schiff MORE (Texas) — Marchant voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieGOP lawmaker says newly-released Butina was jailed due to 'Russophobia' O'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms MORE (Ky.) —"I am going to vote for this. This is a new experience for me to be excited about a bill,” he told CNN.

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHarris introduces bill to prevent California wildfires McCarthy says views on impeachment won't change even if Taylor's testimony is confirmed House Republicans call impeachment hearing 'boring,' dismiss Taylor testimony as hearsay MORE (Calif.)

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersShimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering Bipartisan group reveals agricultural worker immigration bill DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (Wash.)

Rep. Pat MeehanPatrick (Pat) Leo MeehanBottom line Freshman lawmaker jokes about pace of Washington politics Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress MORE (Pa.) — Meehan voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemSouth Dakota drops pipeline protest laws after lawsuit New South Dakota law requiring 'In God We Trust' sign to hang in public schools goes into effect Trump: If I say I should be on Mt. Rushmore, 'I will end up with such bad publicity' MORE (S.D.) — Noem voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesFive takeaways from ex-ambassador's dramatic testimony White House releases rough transcript of early Trump-Ukraine call minutes before impeachment hearing Live coverage: Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies in public impeachment hearing MORE (Calif.) — Nunes voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenTwo swing-district Democrats raise impeachment calls after whistleblower reports Hopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal Fight over Trump's new NAFTA hits key stretch MORE (Minn.) — Paulsen voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedHillicon Valley: Critics press feds to block Google, Fitbit deal | Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-linked accounts | TikTok looks to join online anti-terrorism effort | Apple pledges .5B to affordable housing Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-affiliated accounts after lawmaker pressure Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg would support delaying Libra | More attorneys general join Facebook probe | Defense chief recuses from 'war cloud' contract | Senate GOP blocks two election security bills | FTC brings case against 'stalking' app developer MORE (N.Y.) — Reed was one of only two New York Republicans to support the budget blueprint. He serves on the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (Wash.) — Reichert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jim Renacci (Ohio) — Renacci voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceOn The Money: Lawmakers hammer Zuckerberg over Facebook controversies | GOP chair expects another funding stopgap | Senate rejects Dem measure on SALT deduction cap workarounds House committee advances measure taxing nicotine in vaping products Democrats struggle with repeal of key Trump tax provision MORE (S.C.) — Rice voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Peter Roskam (Ill.) — Roskam voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dennis Ross (Fla.) — Ross told The Hill on Nov. 2 he is a "yes." He serves as a deputy whip.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis Ryan Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan California Governor Newsom and family dress as 2020 Democrats for Halloween DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (Wis.)

Majority Whip Steve Scalise (La.)

Rep. David SchweikertDavid SchweikertLive updates on impeachment: Schiff fires warning at GOP over whistleblower Ethics Committee releases new details on allegations against Arizona GOP lawmaker GOP lawmakers call for provisions barring DOD funds for border wall to be dropped MORE (Ariz.) — Schweikert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Adrian Smith (Neb.) — Smith voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jason Smith (Mo.) — A member of GOP leadership and the Ways and Means Committee, Smith says it’s going to be a “very strong vote.”

Rep. Pat Tiberi (Ohio) — Tiberi voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David Valadao (Calif.) — Valadao is now a "yes," according to The Washington Post.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) — A member of the Ways and Means Committee, Walorski voted for the bill.

Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.)  Walters told The Hill she would vote for the bill.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — Webster told The Hill he is a "yes."