The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill

The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill
© The Hill

House Republicans are voting Thursday on a tax overhaul package and appear to have the votes needed.

The bill would slash corporate tax rates, reduce some individual rates for middle class families and eliminate or scale back some popular breaks.

Republicans from high-tax states like New York and California are worried about cutting back state and local tax deductions and limiting the property tax deduction to $10,000.

Assuming all Democrats vote against the GOP bill, Republican leaders can afford no more than 22 defections.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

RECENT UPDATES: REPS. DAN DONOVAN (R-N.Y.), John FasoJohn James FasoThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority GOP House super PAC targets two freshman Dems with new ads Tax law failed to save GOP majority MORE (R-N.Y.).

This list was last updated on Nov. 16 at 9:43 a.m.

 

NO (10)

Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — Donovan announced he will join a news conference Nov. 16 to voice opposition to the House bill on the day of the vote.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.) — Like Donovan, Faso is set to take part in a Nov. 16 press conference to highlight his opposition to the GOP bill.

Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate Issa says he will run for Congress if not confirmed to trade post by Nov. 3 The Hill's Campaign Report: Pressure builds for Democrats who missed third debate cut MORE (Calif.)  Issa told reporters he cannot vote for bill in its current form. The measure on state and local tax deductions would hit affluent states like California hard.

Rep. Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesRepublican Greg Murphy wins special election in NC's 3rd District Early voting extended in NC counties impacted by Dorian ahead of key House race The Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina special election poses test for GOP ahead of 2020 MORE (N.C.) — Jones, who frequently bucks House leadership, told The Hill he is a "no" because the bill raises the deficit.

Rep. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingHotel industry mounts attack on Airbnb with House bill Obama's tan suit controversy hits 5-year anniversary First House Republican backs bill banning assault weapons MORE (N.Y.) — King on ABC’s "This Week" said he is a "no" vote unless the state and local tax deduction is put back in.

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceGun debate to shape 2020 races GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs Bottom Line MORE (N.J.) — Lance is a "no." He cited changes to state and local income tax deductions.

Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoRepublicans plot comeback in New Jersey K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (N.J.) — "[T]he elimination of state and local income tax deductions and the $10,000 cap on property tax deductions would be detrimental to New Jersey residents," LoBiondo said in a statement. Separately, he announced he would retire at the end of this Congress.

Rep. Chris Smith (N.J.) —"While I believe Americans are overtaxed and need relief, I must vote 'no' this week on the tax bill, H.R. 1, because of its negative impact on New Jersey and my congressional district," he said in a statement Monday.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.) — The co-chairwoman of the moderate Tuesday Group told reporters she is a "no," according to Bloomberg. Stefanik voiced concerns about state and local taxes when the bill was introduced.

Rep. Lee Zeldin (N.Y.) — "We need to fix this State and Local Tax deduction issue," the New York lawmaker said in a statement.

 

UNDECIDED/UNCLEAR (11)

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashTrump's 'soldier of fortune' foreign policy Amash: 'Bolton never should have been hired' Romney: Bolton firing 'a huge loss' for nation MORE (Mich.) — The Freedom Caucus member said it’s too early to know how the bill impacts his constituents. Amash voted "no" on the budget blueprint that opened the door to tax reform.

Rep. Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — Biggs told The Hill on Nov. 10 he's still undecided.

Rep. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockGun debate raises stakes in battle for Virginia legislature Progressives face steep odds in ousting incumbent Democrats K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (Va.) — "I'm still looking at it," Comstock said Nov. 2, the day the bill was introduced.

Rep. Ryan CostelloRyan Anthony CostellloHead of Pennsylvania GOP resigns over alleged explicit texts Lobbying world Overnight Energy: Park Service closing Joshua Tree after shutdown damage | Dems deliver trash from parks to White House | Dems offer bills to block offshore drilling | Oil lobby worries about Trump trade fight MORE (Pa.)  Costello said he was still studying the bill on Nov. 2.

Rep. Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonConservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess GOP leaders struggle to contain conservative anger over budget deal The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (Ohio) — The Freedom Caucus member is undecided. “#TaxReform that raises your taxes is the wrong direction. Still reviewing scenarios from the House and Senate bills," he tweeted Nov. 10.

Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentThe Hill's Morning Report — Mueller testimony gives Trump a boost as Dems ponder next steps The Hill's 12:30 Report: Muller testimony dominates Washington Lawmakers, press hit the courts for charity tennis event MORE (Pa.)  The chairman of the moderate Tuesday Group said he’s “still reviewing it,” but there is a need for tax reform.

Rep. Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Top House GOP appropriations staffer moves to lobbying shop Individuals with significant disabilities need hope and action MORE (N.J.) — The chairman of the Appropriations Committee and a vulnerable Republican told reporters on Friday he was “still looking at the 400-page bill.”

Rep. John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHillicon Valley: Google to promote original reporting | Senators demand answers from Amazon on worker treatment | Lawmakers weigh response to ransomware attacks Lawmakers weigh responses to rash of ransomware attacks Hillicon Valley: Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey's account hacked | Google found iPhone security bug | YouTube reportedly to pay up to 0M to settle child privacy investigation | DNC expected to nix Iowa virtual caucus plans MORE (N.Y.) — Katko is reportedly undecided.

Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis Live coverage: Mueller testifies before Congress 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill MORE (Calif.) — A McClintock spokeswoman told Morning Consult on Nov. 8 that the lawmaker wanted to keep the state and local tax deductions and was waiting to see the final package.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — Rohrabacher said on Nov. 13 he is still reviewing the bill.

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford is undecided. “I struggle with the degree of benefit that comes from lowering taxes on corporations but raising them on some individuals," he said on Nov. 14. “It’s just tough to get your arms around, particularly if you’re a deficit hawk.”

 

LEANING YES (5)

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — DesJarlais says he is “leaning "yes" but I’d like to see the finished product.”

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsGOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan GOP struggles with retirement wave Lewandowski, Democrats tangle at testy hearing MORE (N.C.)  The Freedom Caucus chairman is leaning yes. He called the bill a "work in progress" on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday.

Rep. Ann Wagner (Mo.) — Wagner said she likes the “permanence” of many tax cuts in the bill but would like them to be retroactive for one year. She is close to leadership.

Rep. Mark Walker (N.C.) — The chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee caucus has been very supportive of the tax effort. He said the tax bill “is extremely positive.”

Rep. Roger WilliamsJohn (Roger) Roger WilliamsPopulation shifts set up huge House battleground The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems aim to end anti-Semitism controversy with vote today MORE (Texas) — Williams said the bill is “on the right track,” but he has concerns about a provision on the deductibility of businesses’ interest expenses.

 

YES (45)

Rep. Jim Banks (Ind.) — The freshman lawmaker tells The Hill he is a "yes." 

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (Fla.) — Bilirakis told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Mike Bishop (Mich.) — Bishop voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackBottom line Overnight Health Care: Anti-abortion Democrats take heat from party | More states sue Purdue over opioid epidemic | 1 in 4 in poll say high costs led them to skip medical care Lamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee MORE (Tenn.) ­— Black voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyLobbying groups ask Congress for help on Trump tariffs Republicans pour cold water on Trump's term limit idea Republicans' rendezvous with reality — their plan is to cut Social Security MORE (Texas) — Brady is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee and the architect of the bill.

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — “Leadership did a great job on this thing,” said Brat.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.) — The senior Ways and Means Committee member said the bill “cuts taxes for middle-class families as well as small businesses, simplifies a broken tax code and jump-starts the economy.”

Rep. Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddGirls Little League softball champions get invitation to White House House conservatives call for ethics probe into Joaquin Castro tweet Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess MORE (N.C.)  “Since the beginning, I have asked three main questions: Will this bill cut taxes for the middle class; does this bill make our business climate competitive in the global economy; and does this bill simplify the tax filing process for people at home? The answer to all of these questions are ‘yes,’ ” he said in a statement.

Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerPrimary challenges show potential cracks in Trump's GOP Castro, Steyer join pledge opposing the Keystone XL pipeline EPA proposes rolling back states' authority over pipeline projects MORE (N.D.) — Cramer said he told the president he’s a "yes" on tax reform.

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloPelosi: GOP retirements indicate they'll be in the minority, with Democrat in the White House The Hill's Morning Report - Congress returns: What to expect Wave of GOP retirements threatens 2020 comeback MORE (Fla.) — Curbelo voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisGroups push lawmakers for hearings on voting machine security House Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad MORE (Ill.) — Davis, the new chairman of the Republican Main Street Caucus, told The Hill he will vote "yes."

Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannTrump faces new hit on deficit Lawmakers concede they might have to pass a dreaded 'CR' GOP blasts Democrats for using 2014 'kids in cages' photo to promote migrant hearing MORE (Tenn.) — “I would hope it would be a big vote,” said Fleischmann.

Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (Ariz.) — Franks, a member of the Freedom Caucus, told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisGOP lawmakers, states back gunmaker in Sandy Hook appeal Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess GOP put on the back foot by Trump's race storm MORE (Md.)  He told The Hill he is a "yes" on Friday. His constituents could be heavily impacted by the changes to state and local tax deduction.

Rep. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingDelay of new trade deal harms America's digital advantage Republicans troll Democrats with proposals to rename upcoming health care bill GOP lawmaker calls for investigation into alleged 'anti-Israeli bias' at Duke-UNC conference MORE (N.C.) — Holding voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Lynn JenkinsLynn Haag JenkinsKansas Republican dropping Senate bid to challenge GOP rep Anti-corruption group hits Congress for ignoring K Street, Capitol Hill 'revolving door' K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (Kan.) — Jenkins voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Sam JohnsonSamuel (Sam) Robert JohnsonLobbying world Social Security is approaching crisis territory Texas New Members 2019 MORE (Texas) — Johnson voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump issues Taliban warning at Sept. 11 memorial Republicans pour cold water on Trump's term limit idea MORE (Ohio) — Joyce told The Hill on Nov. 3 he is a "yes." The moderate Republican voted "no" on the ObamaCare repeal.

Rep. Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyHouse votes to repeal ObamaCare's 'Cadillac tax' GOP lawmaker: 'I'm a person of color. I'm white.' Trump signs bipartisan IRS reform bill MORE (Pa.) — Kelly voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaGOP moves to block provision banning use of Defense funds for border wall Rep. Amash stokes talk of campaign against Trump Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill MORE (Calif.) — LaMalfa told Politico he backs the bill but expects changes in conference committee.

Rep. Tom MacArthurThomas (Tom) Charles MacArthurRepublicans plot comeback in New Jersey Republicans spend more than million at Trump properties The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (N.J.)  MacArthur was vocal about the state and local tax deduction but said Tuesday he would vote for the bill. The centrist said he was satisfied with a cap on those deductions.

Rep. Kenny MarchantKenny Ewell MarchantHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Wave of GOP retirements threatens 2020 comeback Texas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state MORE (Texas) — Marchant voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieScalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Airports already have plenty of infrastructure funding Overnight Defense: House votes to block Trump arms sales to Saudis, setting up likely veto | US officially kicks Turkey out of F-35 program | Pentagon sending 2,100 more troops to border MORE (Ky.) —"I am going to vote for this. This is a new experience for me to be excited about a bill,” he told CNN.

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyBudowsky: Donald, Boris, Bibi — The right in retreat Hoyer calls on GOP leader to denounce 'despicable' ad attacking Ocasio-Cortez The Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks MORE (Calif.)

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersSocial determinants of health — health care isn't just bugs and bacteria Lawmakers deride FTC settlement as weak on Facebook Overnight Energy: Fight over fuel standards intensifies | Democrats grill Trump officials over rule rollback | California official blasts EPA chief over broken talks | Former EPA official says Wheeler lied to Congress MORE (Wash.)

Rep. Pat MeehanPatrick (Pat) Leo MeehanBottom line Freshman lawmaker jokes about pace of Washington politics Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress MORE (Pa.) — Meehan voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemNew South Dakota law requiring 'In God We Trust' sign to hang in public schools goes into effect Trump: If I say I should be on Mt. Rushmore, 'I will end up with such bad publicity' Transportation Department seeks to crack down on pipeline protests: report MORE (S.D.) — Noem voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesWe've lost sight of the real scandal Twitter won't disclose who's running parody accounts being sued by Devin Nunes Nunes campaign drops lawsuit against constituents who accused him of being a 'fake farmer' MORE (Calif.) — Nunes voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenHopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal Fight over Trump's new NAFTA hits key stretch Blue states angry over SALT cap should give fiscal sobriety a try MORE (Minn.) — Paulsen voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedLobbying World Gun debate to shape 2020 races Conservatives push Trump tariff relief over payroll tax cuts MORE (N.Y.) — Reed was one of only two New York Republicans to support the budget blueprint. He serves on the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertLymphedema Treatment Act would provide a commonsense solution to a fixable problem Yoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm MORE (Wash.) — Reichert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jim Renacci (Ohio) — Renacci voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceDemocrats struggle with repeal of key Trump tax provision The Hill's Morning Report - Trump struggles to replicate 2016 coalition Nonagenarian D-Day veterans recreate parachute drops over Normandy MORE (S.C.) — Rice voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Peter Roskam (Ill.) — Roskam voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dennis Ross (Fla.) — Ross told The Hill on Nov. 2 he is a "yes." He serves as a deputy whip.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThree-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate Krystal Ball touts Sanders odds in Texas Republicans pour cold water on Trump's term limit idea MORE (Wis.)

Majority Whip Steve Scalise (La.)

Rep. David SchweikertDavid SchweikertEthics Committee releases new details on allegations against Arizona GOP lawmaker GOP lawmakers call for provisions barring DOD funds for border wall to be dropped Bipartisan resolution aims to protect lawmakers amid heightened threats of violence MORE (Ariz.) — Schweikert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Adrian Smith (Neb.) — Smith voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jason Smith (Mo.) — A member of GOP leadership and the Ways and Means Committee, Smith says it’s going to be a “very strong vote.”

Rep. Pat Tiberi (Ohio) — Tiberi voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David Valadao (Calif.) — Valadao is now a "yes," according to The Washington Post.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) — A member of the Ways and Means Committee, Walorski voted for the bill.

Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.)  Walters told The Hill she would vote for the bill.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — Webster told The Hill he is a "yes."