The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill

The Hill's Whip List: Where Republicans stand on tax-reform bill
© The Hill

House Republicans are voting Thursday on a tax overhaul package and appear to have the votes needed.

The bill would slash corporate tax rates, reduce some individual rates for middle class families and eliminate or scale back some popular breaks.

Republicans from high-tax states like New York and California are worried about cutting back state and local tax deductions and limiting the property tax deduction to $10,000.

Assuming all Democrats vote against the GOP bill, Republican leaders can afford no more than 22 defections.

Here is a look at how the votes are stacking up.

The Hill will be updating this list. Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

RECENT UPDATES: REPS. DAN DONOVAN (R-N.Y.), John FasoJohn James FasoThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority GOP House super PAC targets two freshman Dems with new ads Tax law failed to save GOP majority MORE (R-N.Y.).

This list was last updated on Nov. 16 at 9:43 a.m.

 

NO (10)

Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — Donovan announced he will join a news conference Nov. 16 to voice opposition to the House bill on the day of the vote.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.) — Like Donovan, Faso is set to take part in a Nov. 16 press conference to highlight his opposition to the GOP bill.

Rep. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaThe Hill's Morning Report — Shutdown fallout — economic distress Former congressmen, RNC members appointed to Trump administration roles Senate throws hundreds of Trump nominees into limbo MORE (Calif.)  Issa told reporters he cannot vote for bill in its current form. The measure on state and local tax deductions would hit affluent states like California hard.

Rep. Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesNorth Carolina reporter says there could be 'new crop' of GOP candidates in 9th Congressional District race House pays tribute to Walter Jones GOP leader presses Trump to agree to border deal MORE (N.C.) — Jones, who frequently bucks House leadership, told The Hill he is a "no" because the bill raises the deficit.

Rep. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingRepublicans defend McCain amid Trump attacks The 23 Republicans who voted against the anti-hate resolution House passes second major gun bill MORE (N.Y.) — King on ABC’s "This Week" said he is a "no" vote unless the state and local tax deduction is put back in.

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LancePush for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems Incoming Dem lawmaker: Trump 'sympathizes' with leaders 'accused of moral transgressions' On The Money: Why the tax law failed to save the GOP majority | Grassley opts for Finance gavel, setting Graham up for Judiciary | Trump says China eager for trade deal | Facebook reeling after damning NYT report MORE (N.J.) — Lance is a "no." He cited changes to state and local income tax deductions.

Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority LoBiondo launches consulting firm Live coverage: House elects new Speaker as Dems take charge MORE (N.J.) — "[T]he elimination of state and local income tax deductions and the $10,000 cap on property tax deductions would be detrimental to New Jersey residents," LoBiondo said in a statement. Separately, he announced he would retire at the end of this Congress.

Rep. Chris Smith (N.J.) —"While I believe Americans are overtaxed and need relief, I must vote 'no' this week on the tax bill, H.R. 1, because of its negative impact on New Jersey and my congressional district," he said in a statement Monday.

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.) — The co-chairwoman of the moderate Tuesday Group told reporters she is a "no," according to Bloomberg. Stefanik voiced concerns about state and local taxes when the bill was introduced.

Rep. Lee Zeldin (N.Y.) — "We need to fix this State and Local Tax deduction issue," the New York lawmaker said in a statement.

 

UNDECIDED/UNCLEAR (11)

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashProperty is a fundamental right that is now being threatened GOP lawmaker tells party to 'do better' after O'Rourke St. Patrick's Day post The 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration MORE (Mich.) — The Freedom Caucus member said it’s too early to know how the bill impacts his constituents. Amash voted "no" on the budget blueprint that opened the door to tax reform.

Rep. Andy Biggs (Ariz.) — Biggs told The Hill on Nov. 10 he's still undecided.

Rep. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockGOP lawmaker introduces bill to stop revolving door Ex-lawmakers face new scrutiny over lobbying Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign MORE (Va.) — "I'm still looking at it," Comstock said Nov. 2, the day the bill was introduced.

Rep. Ryan CostelloRyan Anthony CostellloOvernight Energy: Park Service closing Joshua Tree after shutdown damage | Dems deliver trash from parks to White House | Dems offer bills to block offshore drilling | Oil lobby worries about Trump trade fight Ex-GOP Rep. Ryan Costello joins group pushing carbon tax Exiting lawmakers jockey for K Street perch MORE (Pa.)  Costello said he was still studying the bill on Nov. 2.

Rep. Warren DavidsonWarren Earl DavidsonNew push to open banks to marijuana industry Washington must defend American crypto innovation, not crush it GOP lawmaker unveils bill soliciting private contributions to pay for border wall MORE (Ohio) — The Freedom Caucus member is undecided. “#TaxReform that raises your taxes is the wrong direction. Still reviewing scenarios from the House and Senate bills," he tweeted Nov. 10.

Rep. Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentThe Hill's Morning Report - Government is funded, but for how long? Ex-GOP lawmaker says his party is having a 'Monty Python' moment on shutdown Former GOP lawmaker: Republicans know shutdown is ‘a fight they cannot win’ MORE (Pa.)  The chairman of the moderate Tuesday Group said he’s “still reviewing it,” but there is a need for tax reform.

Rep. Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Top House GOP appropriations staffer moves to lobbying shop Individuals with significant disabilities need hope and action MORE (N.J.) — The chairman of the Appropriations Committee and a vulnerable Republican told reporters on Friday he was “still looking at the 400-page bill.”

Rep. John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoThe importance of moderate voters Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' MORE (N.Y.) — Katko is reportedly undecided.

Rep. Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockHouse passes bill expressing support for NATO Oregon Dem top recipient of 2018 marijuana industry money, study finds Rep. Mike Johnson wins race for RSC chairman MORE (Calif.) — A McClintock spokeswoman told Morning Consult on Nov. 8 that the lawmaker wanted to keep the state and local tax deductions and was waiting to see the final package.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — Rohrabacher said on Nov. 13 he is still reviewing the bill.

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford is undecided. “I struggle with the degree of benefit that comes from lowering taxes on corporations but raising them on some individuals," he said on Nov. 14. “It’s just tough to get your arms around, particularly if you’re a deficit hawk.”

 

LEANING YES (5)

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — DesJarlais says he is “leaning "yes" but I’d like to see the finished product.”

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsConservatives wage assault on Mueller report Trump, Congress brace for Mueller findings CNN's Toobin: 'Swirl of suspicion' about more indictments not justified MORE (N.C.)  The Freedom Caucus chairman is leaning yes. He called the bill a "work in progress" on ABC's "This Week" on Sunday.

Rep. Ann Wagner (Mo.) — Wagner said she likes the “permanence” of many tax cuts in the bill but would like them to be retroactive for one year. She is close to leadership.

Rep. Mark Walker (N.C.) — The chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee caucus has been very supportive of the tax effort. He said the tax bill “is extremely positive.”

Rep. Roger WilliamsJohn (Roger) Roger WilliamsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems aim to end anti-Semitism controversy with vote today CPAC attendees say Biden poses greatest threat to Trump Don’t look for House GOP to defy Trump on border wall MORE (Texas) — Williams said the bill is “on the right track,” but he has concerns about a provision on the deductibility of businesses’ interest expenses.

 

YES (45)

Rep. Jim Banks (Ind.) — The freshman lawmaker tells The Hill he is a "yes." 

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (Fla.) — Bilirakis told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Mike Bishop (Mich.) — Bishop voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackLamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee Juan Williams: The GOP's worsening problem with women How to reform the federal electric vehicle tax credit MORE (Tenn.) ­— Black voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyJOBS for Success Act would recognize that all people have potential Smaller tax refunds put GOP on defensive Key author of GOP tax law joins Ernst and Young MORE (Texas) — Brady is chairman of the Ways and Means Committee and the architect of the bill.

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — “Leadership did a great job on this thing,” said Brat.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (Fla.) — The senior Ways and Means Committee member said the bill “cuts taxes for middle-class families as well as small businesses, simplifies a broken tax code and jump-starts the economy.”

Rep. Ted BuddTheodore (Ted) Paul BuddGOP's Tillis comes under pressure for taking on Trump The 23 Republicans who voted against the anti-hate resolution House passes anti-hate measure amid Dem tensions MORE (N.C.)  “Since the beginning, I have asked three main questions: Will this bill cut taxes for the middle class; does this bill make our business climate competitive in the global economy; and does this bill simplify the tax filing process for people at home? The answer to all of these questions are ‘yes,’ ” he said in a statement.

Rep. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerOn The Money: Trump reverses North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Trump to nominate Stephen Moore to Fed | Monthly deficit hits record 4 billion | IRS expands penalty relief for taxpayers Overnight Health Care: Dems demand answers on rule targeting Planned Parenthood | Senators tell FDA to speed approval of generic insulin | Nearly 8 in 10 say drug prices are 'unreasonable' in new poll Senators tell FDA to speed up approvals of generic insulin MORE (N.D.) — Cramer said he told the president he’s a "yes" on tax reform.

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloEx-GOP lawmaker joins marijuana trade group Dems think they're beating Trump in emergency declaration battle Trump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign MORE (Fla.) — Curbelo voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisOvernight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all Dem group launches ads attacking Trump's 'hypocrisy on Medicare and Medicaid cuts' GOP lawmakers: House leaders already jockeying for leadership contests MORE (Ill.) — Davis, the new chairman of the Republican Main Street Caucus, told The Hill he will vote "yes."

Rep. Chuck FleischmannCharles (Chuck) Joseph FleischmannCongress seeks to avoid new shutdown: Five things to watch On The Money: Negotiators discussing border funding lower than Trump's demand | Amazon reconsiders HQ2 move to New York City | Early IRS numbers point to smaller average refunds Bipartisan House group heads to Camp David retreat MORE (Tenn.) — “I would hope it would be a big vote,” said Fleischmann.

Rep. Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (Ariz.) — Franks, a member of the Freedom Caucus, told The Hill on Nov. 14 he will vote "yes."

Rep. Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisHouse passes bill expressing support for NATO Activist who met with GOP lawmakers also promotes ‘black violence’ gene: report Marijuana activists arrested for smoking outside GOP lawmaker's office MORE (Md.)  He told The Hill he is a "yes" on Friday. His constituents could be heavily impacted by the changes to state and local tax deduction.

Rep. George HoldingGeorge Edward Bell HoldingKoch-backed group pushes for new limits on Trump's tariff authority House Dems unveil initial GOP targets in 2020 Election Day: An hour-by-hour viewer’s guide MORE (N.C.) — Holding voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Lynn JenkinsLynn Haag JenkinsPompeo seen as top recruit for Kansas Senate seat Exiting lawmakers jockey for K Street perch GOP seeks to ram through Trump’s B wall demand MORE (Kan.) — Jenkins voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Sam JohnsonSamuel (Sam) Robert JohnsonTexas New Members 2019 Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress May brings key primaries across nation MORE (Texas) — Johnson voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceAlito, Kagan oppose cameras in Supreme Court Dem chairwoman seeks watchdog probe of Park Service’s shutdown operations Marijuana industry boosts DC lobbying team MORE (Ohio) — Joyce told The Hill on Nov. 3 he is a "yes." The moderate Republican voted "no" on the ObamaCare repeal.

Rep. Mike KellyGeorge (Mike) Joseph KellyThe fear of colorectal cancer as a springboard for change IRS watchdog urges agency to provide more underpayment penalty relief Congress needs to unite and pass this key infrastructure legislation MORE (Pa.) — Kelly voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaThe 23 Republicans who voted against the anti-hate resolution House passes anti-hate measure amid Dem tensions Overnight Energy: Trump threatens to stop FEMA funding for California fire relief | Wheeler officially nominated to be EPA head | Wildlife refuges to get staff during shutdown MORE (Calif.) — LaMalfa told Politico he backs the bill but expects changes in conference committee.

Rep. Tom MacArthurThomas (Tom) Charles MacArthurThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority 10 things we learned from the midterms New Jersey New Members 2019 MORE (N.J.)  MacArthur was vocal about the state and local tax deduction but said Tuesday he would vote for the bill. The centrist said he was satisfied with a cap on those deductions.

Rep. Kenny MarchantKenny Ewell MarchantTreasury expands penalty relief to more taxpayers Dems press Mnuchin on Trump tax returns Mnuchin to consider providing more penalty relief for taxpayers MORE (Texas) — Marchant voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Trump: I told Republicans to vote for 'transparency' in releasing Mueller report House votes for Mueller report to be made public MORE (Ky.) —"I am going to vote for this. This is a new experience for me to be excited about a bill,” he told CNN.

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHouse leaders need to modernize Congress for the sake of America Overnight Energy: McConnell tees up vote on Green New Deal | Centrist Dems pitch alternative to plan | House Republican likens Green New Deal to genocide | Coca-Cola reveals it uses 3M tons of plastic every year House GOP lawmaker says Green New Deal is like genocide MORE (Calif.)

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration GOP pushes back on net neutrality bill at testy hearing Hillicon Valley: Dems renew fight over net neutrality | Zuckerberg vows more 'privacy-focused' Facebook | House Dems focus on diversity in Silicon Valley | FBI chief warns of new disinformation campaigns MORE (Wash.)

Rep. Pat MeehanPatrick (Pat) Leo MeehanFreshman lawmaker jokes about pace of Washington politics Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress Dem Scanlon wins House seat in Pennsylvania MORE (Pa.) — Meehan voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemKentucky House approves bill to let people carry concealed guns without a permit Journalists seek federal, state support for right to inform the public The Hill's 12:30 Report: First test for Trump emergency declaration MORE (S.D.) — Noem voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesNunes faces tough odds with Twitter lawsuit Conservatives wage assault on Mueller report Hillicon Valley: EU hits Google with .7 billion antitrust fine | GOP steps up attack over tech bias claims | Dems ask FTC for budget wishlist | Justices punt on Google privacy settlement MORE (Calif.) — Nunes voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenPush for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems Lawmakers beat lobbyists at charity hockey game The 8 House Republicans who voted against Trump’s border wall MORE (Minn.) — Paulsen voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedPush for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems Lower refunds amplify calls to restore key tax deduction Drug pricing fight centers on insulin MORE (N.Y.) — Reed was one of only two New York Republicans to support the budget blueprint. He serves on the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertYoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm Outgoing GOP rep says law enforcement, not Congress should conduct investigations MORE (Wash.) — Reichert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jim Renacci (Ohio) — Renacci voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom RiceHugh (Tom) Thompson RiceKoch-backed group pushes for new limits on Trump's tariff authority 7 law enforcement officers shot in South Carolina How Washington can tackle hearing loss related to diabetes MORE (S.C.) — Rice voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Peter Roskam (Ill.) — Roskam voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dennis Ross (Fla.) — Ross told The Hill on Nov. 2 he is a "yes." He serves as a deputy whip.

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanFormer Dem candidate says he faced cultural barriers on the campaign trail because he is working-class Former House candidate and ex-ironworker says there is 'buyer's remorse' for Trump in Midwest Head of top hedge fund association to step down MORE (Wis.)

Majority Whip Steve Scalise (La.)

Rep. David SchweikertDavid SchweikertOn The Money: Trump trade chief sees tough work ahead on China | Cohen offers gripping testimony | Tells lawmakers Trump inflated assets | Deduction cap could hit 11 million taxpayers | Senate confirms top IRS lawyer Trump trade chief warns of tough work ahead on China deal The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race MORE (Ariz.) — Schweikert voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Adrian Smith (Neb.) — Smith voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jason Smith (Mo.) — A member of GOP leadership and the Ways and Means Committee, Smith says it’s going to be a “very strong vote.”

Rep. Pat Tiberi (Ohio) — Tiberi voted for the bill on the Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David Valadao (Calif.) — Valadao is now a "yes," according to The Washington Post.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) — A member of the Ways and Means Committee, Walorski voted for the bill.

Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.)  Walters told The Hill she would vote for the bill.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — Webster told The Hill he is a "yes."