Conyers lawyer: Pelosi 'sure as hell' won't be the one to tell Conyers to leave

An attorney for Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersBiden's immigration plan has serious problems Tlaib wins Michigan Democratic primary Tlaib holds lead in early vote count against primary challenger MORE Jr. (D-Mich.) said Thursday the congressman has not decided whether to resign in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations, adding that House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiWhite House officials, Democrats spar over legality, substance of executive orders Sunday shows - Trump coronavirus executive orders reverberate Pelosi: 'Of course there's room for compromise' on 0-per-week unemployment benefit MORE (D-Calif.) “sure as hell” won’t make Conyers’s decision.

“Nancy Pelosi did not elect the congressman and she sure as hell won’t be the one to tell the congressman to leave,” attorney Arnold Reed said, according to multiple media reports.

Pelosi earlier Thursday said Conyers should resign in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations from former staffers.

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Reed told reporters Thursday that Pelosi will have to explain “what is the discernible difference between Sen. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenCNN publishes first Al Franken op-ed since resignation Political world mourns loss of comedian Jerry Stiller Maher to Tara Reade on timing of sexual assault allegation: 'Why wait until Biden is our only hope?' MORE and John Conyers.”

Multiple women have also accused Franken of sexual misconduct. Franken has not indicated he has any plans to resign, and his Democratic colleagues have not called on him to step down.

Conyers is reportedly facing pressure from the Congressional Black Caucus and other lawmakers to step down following a BuzzFeed News report that Conyers settled a wrongful dismissal complaint in 2015 after a former employee accused him of firing her for resisting his “sexual advances.” 

Rep. James Clyburn (S.C.), the third-ranking House Democrat and a powerful voice in the CBC, is also calling for Conyers to give up his seat, telling Conyers directly that it's in his best interest. 

Documents showed that other women described Conyers as making unwanted sexual advances. Multiple other women have since come forward to accuse Conyers of similar misconduct. 

Conyers has denied the allegations but acknowledged he settled the wrongful termination case to avoid litigation.

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Conyers, 88, was taken to the hospital Wednesday night due to stress.

The House Ethics Committee has launched an investigation into Conyers.

Mike Lillis contributed