Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus

Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus
© Keren Carrion

Four lawmakers, two Republicans and two Democrats, joined the House Climate Solutions Caucus on Tuesday, according to a press release from the group.

Reps. Mark SanfordMarshall (Mark) Clement SanfordTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Endorsing Trump isn’t the easiest decision for some Republicans Mark Sanford warns US could see ‘Hitler-like character’ in the future MORE (R-S.C.), Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.), Elizabeth EstyElizabeth Henderson EstyConnecticut elects first black congresswoman Former aides alleging sexual harassment on Capitol Hill urge congressional action Rising Dem star in Connecticut says people like me ‘deserve a seat at the table’ in Congress MORE (D-Conn) and David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act Rhode Island lawmaker makes pitch to firms boycotting Georgia abortion law MORE (D-R.I.) all joined the group, which seeks bipartisan solutions to climate change issues such as carbon emissions and rising sea levels.

The caucus, formed in February of last year, is chaired by Florida Reps. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloDisinvited GOP lawmaker turns up at Dem hearing Overnight Energy: 2020 rivals rip Biden over expected 'middle ground' climate plan | Dems cancel plans to invite Republican to testify on climate change | House passes .2B disaster aid bill over Trump objections Dems cancel plans to bring in Republican as climate change witness MORE (R) and Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchHouse ethics panel renews probes into three GOP lawmakers Overnight Energy: Bipartisan climate caucus eyes litmus test for new members| Green groups want freeze on Keystone construction| Bernhardt sworn in as Secretary of Interior Overnight Energy: Bipartisan climate caucus eyes litmus test for new members | Greens want freeze on Keystone construction | Bernhardt sworn in as Interior chief MORE (D). It splits its membership evenly among Democrats and Republicans.

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In his statement, Sanford cited rising sea levels afflicting his family farm in South Carolina as a way the effects of climate change have become a personal issue.

"For over 30 years, I have seen the ever-so-gradual effects of rising sea levels at our farm on the South Carolina coast. I've watched once-thriving pine trees die in that fragile zone between uplands and salt marshes," Sanford said in a statement. "To me, the idea that we should be good stewards of what we’ve been given simply makes sense."

Donovan, meanwhile, cited the devastating damage of Superstorm Sandy in 2012, which caused at least $75 billion in damages in New York and the surrounding region. 

“Five years ago, Superstorm Sandy devastated Staten Island and other parts of New York City — and just this year we saw hurricanes and wildfires ravage our nation," the New York Republican said.

"Extreme weather events pose a significant risk to the safety of millions of Americans, businesses and properties, and we must act now to confront these challenges."

The Climate Solutions Caucus has been credited with warming House Republican attitudes toward climate change and environmental legislation, and has grown steadily since its founding over a year ago.