Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus

Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus
© Keren Carrion

Four lawmakers, two Republicans and two Democrats, joined the House Climate Solutions Caucus on Tuesday, according to a press release from the group.

Reps. Mark SanfordMark SanfordCheney clashes with Trump Sessions-Tuberville Senate runoff heats up in Alabama The Memo: Can the Never Trumpers succeed? MORE (R-S.C.), Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.), Elizabeth EstyElizabeth Henderson EstyConnecticut elects first black congresswoman Former aides alleging sexual harassment on Capitol Hill urge congressional action Rising Dem star in Connecticut says people like me ‘deserve a seat at the table’ in Congress MORE (D-Conn) and David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineOVERNIGHT ENERGY: DOJ whistleblower says California emissions probe was 'abuse of authority' | EPA won't defend policy blocking grantees from serving on boards | Minnesota sues Exxon, others over climate change DOJ whistleblower: California emissions probe was 'abuse of authority' Hillicon Valley: Apple's developer dispute draws lawmaker scrutiny of App Store | GOP senator blocks bill to expand mail-in and early voting | Twitter flags Trump tweet on protesters for including 'threat of harm' MORE (D-R.I.) all joined the group, which seeks bipartisan solutions to climate change issues such as carbon emissions and rising sea levels.

The caucus, formed in February of last year, is chaired by Florida Reps. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Memo: GOP cringes at new Trump race controversy Trump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy Republicans can't exploit the left's climate extremism without a better idea MORE (R) and Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchUS lawmakers call on EU to label entire Hezbollah a terrorist organization 189 House Democrats urge Israel to 'reconsider' annexation Partisan divide on annexation complicates US-Israel relationship MORE (D). It splits its membership evenly among Democrats and Republicans.

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In his statement, Sanford cited rising sea levels afflicting his family farm in South Carolina as a way the effects of climate change have become a personal issue.

"For over 30 years, I have seen the ever-so-gradual effects of rising sea levels at our farm on the South Carolina coast. I've watched once-thriving pine trees die in that fragile zone between uplands and salt marshes," Sanford said in a statement. "To me, the idea that we should be good stewards of what we’ve been given simply makes sense."

Donovan, meanwhile, cited the devastating damage of Superstorm Sandy in 2012, which caused at least $75 billion in damages in New York and the surrounding region. 

“Five years ago, Superstorm Sandy devastated Staten Island and other parts of New York City — and just this year we saw hurricanes and wildfires ravage our nation," the New York Republican said.

"Extreme weather events pose a significant risk to the safety of millions of Americans, businesses and properties, and we must act now to confront these challenges."

The Climate Solutions Caucus has been credited with warming House Republican attitudes toward climate change and environmental legislation, and has grown steadily since its founding over a year ago.