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Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus

Four lawmakers join House Climate Solutions Caucus
© Keren Carrion

Four lawmakers, two Republicans and two Democrats, joined the House Climate Solutions Caucus on Tuesday, according to a press release from the group.

Reps. Mark SanfordMark SanfordOn The Money: Business world braces for blue sweep | Federal Reserve chief to outline plans for inflation, economy | Meadows 'not optimistic' about stalemate on coronavirus deal Trump critic Sanford forms anti-debt advocacy group Republicans officially renominate Trump for president MORE (R-S.C.), Dan Donovan (R-N.Y.), Elizabeth EstyElizabeth Henderson EstyConnecticut elects first black congresswoman Former aides alleging sexual harassment on Capitol Hill urge congressional action Rising Dem star in Connecticut says people like me ‘deserve a seat at the table’ in Congress MORE (D-Conn) and David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillinePocan won't seek another term as Progressive Caucus co-chair Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL Pelosi suggests Trump setting 'dangerous' example with quick return to White House MORE (D-R.I.) all joined the group, which seeks bipartisan solutions to climate change issues such as carbon emissions and rising sea levels.

The caucus, formed in February of last year, is chaired by Florida Reps. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Memo: Trump furor stokes fears of unrest GOP wants more vision, policy from Trump at convention Mucarsel-Powell, Giménez to battle for Florida swing district MORE (R) and Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchShakespeare Theatre Company goes virtual for 'Will on the Hill...or Won't They?' Florida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum Matt Gaetz, Roger Stone back far-right activist Laura Loomer in congressional bid MORE (D). It splits its membership evenly among Democrats and Republicans.

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In his statement, Sanford cited rising sea levels afflicting his family farm in South Carolina as a way the effects of climate change have become a personal issue.

"For over 30 years, I have seen the ever-so-gradual effects of rising sea levels at our farm on the South Carolina coast. I've watched once-thriving pine trees die in that fragile zone between uplands and salt marshes," Sanford said in a statement. "To me, the idea that we should be good stewards of what we’ve been given simply makes sense."

Donovan, meanwhile, cited the devastating damage of Superstorm Sandy in 2012, which caused at least $75 billion in damages in New York and the surrounding region. 

“Five years ago, Superstorm Sandy devastated Staten Island and other parts of New York City — and just this year we saw hurricanes and wildfires ravage our nation," the New York Republican said.

"Extreme weather events pose a significant risk to the safety of millions of Americans, businesses and properties, and we must act now to confront these challenges."

The Climate Solutions Caucus has been credited with warming House Republican attitudes toward climate change and environmental legislation, and has grown steadily since its founding over a year ago.