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Ryan calls Trump 's---hole' remarks 'unhelpful' and 'unfortunate'

Breaking his silence, Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Budowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only Cheney at donor retreat says Trump's actions 'a line that cannot be crossed': report MORE (R-Wis.) on Friday called President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Memo: The Obamas unbound, on race Iran says onus is on US to rejoin nuclear deal on third anniversary of withdrawal Assaults on Roe v Wade increasing MORE's "shithole countries" remarks "very unfortunate" and "unhelpful," noting that he himself was a descendant of Irish immigrants who had faced prejudice and hostilities when they first moved to America.

The Speaker said he had read press accounts Thursday night about Trump’s immigration meeting with lawmakers in which he reportedly complained about restoring protected status for immigrants from “shithole countries” like Haiti, El Salvador and some African nations.

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“The first thing that came to my mind was very unfortunate, unhelpful,” Ryan said at a WisPolitics event in Milwaukee. “But you know what I thought of right away? I thought of my own family.

“My family, like a whole lot of people, came from Ireland on what they called coffin ships and came here and worked the railroads. The Irish were really looked down upon in those days,” Ryan said, detailing how his ancestors emigrated from Ireland and ended up in Janesville, Wisconsin.

“I hear all these stories from my relatives about ‘Irish need not apply.’ [The Irish] could basically get constructions jobs, cops or firefighter jobs. And James and Catherine Ryan came over and literally worked the railroad until they had enough money to buy a farm, which happened to be outside of Janesville, Wisconsin.

“Then their son, my great-grandfather, started a railroad business with horse plows and it’s an earth-moving business which to this day is run by my cousins. It is a beautiful story of America, and that is a great story.”

“That is a story we have today. That is a story we had yesterday. And that is what makes this country so exceptional and unique in the first place,” Ryan went on. “So I see this as something to celebrate and I think it’s a big part of our strength, whether you are coming from Haiti — we’ve got great friends from Africa in Janesville who are doctors, who are just incredible citizens.”

So far, Ryan is the only member of GOP leadership to criticize Trump's remarks, roughly 20 hours after The Washington Post reported on what was said in the Oval Office meeting. But Ryan’s reaction is much softer than other leading figures in the party.

Rep. Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveVoters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican Democrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains McAdams concedes to Owens in competitive Utah district MORE (R-Utah), who is Haitian American, called on Trump to apologize for remarks that were "unkind, divisive, elitist, and fly in the face of our nation’s values." Michael Steele, who was the first African-American chairman of the Republican National Committee, said it's “incontrovertible” evidence Trump is a racist.

Trump has denied he made the vulgar comment, saying he simply used tough language to reflect his position that the United States should change its immigration policies, and said Haiti is a poor country.

But Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinAmerica's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do Schumer 'exploring' passing immigration unilaterally if talks unravel On The Money: Incomes, consumer spending soared in March | Harris, senators work behind scenes on jobs package | Biden cancels some border wall construction MORE (D-Ill.), who attended the meeting, said Trump did make the "hateful" remarks. Two Republicans in attendance, Sens. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonTim Scott sparks buzz in crowded field of White House hopefuls Opposition to refugees echoes one of America's most shameful moments White House defends CDC outreach to teachers union MORE (Ark.) and David Perdue (Ga.), said they did not "recall" Trump making the remark.

Sen. Tim ScottTimothy (Tim) Eugene ScottUpdating the aging infrastructure in Historically Black Colleges and Universities McConnell amid Trump criticism: 'I'm looking forward, not backward' The instructive popularity of Biden's 'New Deal' for the middle class MORE (R-S.C.) said the senior senator from his state, Republican Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamLindsey Graham: GOP can't 'move forward without President Trump' House to advance appropriations bills in June, July The unflappable Liz Cheney: Why Trump Republicans have struggled to crush her  MORE, who also participated in the Trump meeting, told him the “shithole countries” comment was “basically accurate.”

 
The firestorm over Trump’s remarks complicate already delicate immigration negotiations between Democrats and Republicans. The two sides are struggling to reach a deal on how to shield hundreds of thousands of young "Dreamers" from deportation as conservatives clamor for tougher border-security measures.

Friday was far from the first time Ryan, the highest-ranking Republican on Capitol Hill, has publicly distanced himself from Trump’s controversial words or actions.

During the 2016 campaign, Trump said a federal judge could not fairly rule in a case against Trump University because of his Mexican heritage.

At an anti-poverty event outside of Washington, Ryan slammed Trump’s remarks about Judge Gonzalo Curiel, calling them the “textbook definition of racist comments.”

"I regret these comments that he made," Ryan said. "I think that should be absolutely disavowed."