Dems fear ‘Stephen Miller ambush’ on immigration

President TrumpDonald TrumpOvernight Defense & National Security — Presented by Boeing — Milley warns of 'Sputnik moment' for China WSJ publishes letter from Trump continuing to allege voter fraud in PA Oath Keeper who was at Capitol on Jan. 6 runs for New Jersey State Assembly MORE’s inflammatory remarks against immigrants from a host of developing nations have sparked outrage amid talks on the fate of so-called Dreamers, just as lawmakers from both parties were claiming progress on a hard-fought deal.

But supporters of the immigration package say the deeper threat to an agreement is not the president, but the conservatives in both the White House and Congress fighting to kill the deal before it can pick up steam — an effort they’re calling the "Stephen Miller ambush,” referencing a top White House aide.

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The leading negotiators on an immigration package — Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMcConnell backs Herschel Walker in Georgia Senate race After 35 years, Congress should finally end the sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine McCain blasts Graham for refuting funeral remark about Kushner, Ivanka Trump MORE (R-S.C.) and Dick DurbinDick DurbinPatience wears thin as Democrats miss deadlines 535 'presidents' with veto power: Why budget deal remains elusive After 35 years, Congress should finally end the sentencing disparity between crack and powder cocaine MORE (D-Ill.) — were invited to the White House Thursday to huddle with Trump on their emerging agreement to combine protections for Dreamers, young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children, with tougher border security and new restrictions on immigration.

They were reportedly surprised to find a handful of Republican lawmakers joining the meeting, including Sens. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonCotton tells Garland: 'Thank God you're not on the Supreme Court' It's time for Fauci to go — but don't expect it to happen Is the Navy totally at sea? MORE (R-Ark.) and David Perdue (R-Ga.), as well as Rep. Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteFight breaks out between Jordan, Nadler over rules about showing video at Garland hearing The job of shielding journalists is not finished Bottom line MORE (R-Va.), all immigration hard-liners who are opposed to the Graham-Durbin framework, which they deem too soft on enforcement.

“Graham and Durbin expect to have a meeting, they show up and there’s this anti-immigrant cast of characters there. And that was obviously designed by Stephen Miller to try to kill the deal,” said a senior Democratic aide.

There’s no love lost between immigration reform advocates and Miller, a senior adviser to Trump long known for his tough approach to immigration policy. As an aide to former Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump criticizes Justice for restoring McCabe's benefits McCabe wins back full FBI pension after being fired under Trump Overnight Hillicon Valley — Apple issues security update against spyware vulnerability MORE (R-Ala.), now Trump’s attorney general, Miller built a reputation on Capitol Hill as a staunch opponent of any effort to provide legal protections for those living in the country illegally. He’s also the author of a White House memo demanding a host of enforcement provisions as part of any agreement to protect those eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, an Obama-era initiative providing temporary benefits to certain immigrants brought to the country illegally as kids. Trump dismantled the program in September but is urging Congress to enact a legislative fix, setting a deadline of March 5.

Amid Thursday’s meeting, Trump allegedly spurned a bipartisan effort to allow new immigrants — even in reduced numbers — from African nations, Haiti and El Salvador, characterizing them as “shithole countries.” The comments sparked an immediate outcry from lawmakers in both parties and has consumed much of the media’s attention over the last 36 hours.

But the more damaging development to come from the meeting, the aide said, “was the Stephen Miller ambush.”

“Everyone expects Trump to say stupid things, and obviously this is a new low,” the aide said.  

“But I think the more unhelpful thing is that Stephen Miller is feeling empowered and is apparently running the White House in terms of immigration policy, and has the ability to create this ambush situation.”

The White House on Friday rejected that narrative, saying Trump had requested all the participants at the White House meeting. The president first spoke directly to Graham and Durbin by phone on Thursday, inviting them to the Oval Office later in the day to discuss their DACA proposal, according to a senior White House official. Afterward, he asked his staff to “get Cotton and Purdue to come because they represent different viewpoints,” the official said.

“And then he called [Rep.] Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyAnti-Trump Republicans target McCarthy, Scalise, other high-profile conservatives Congress may be right to cite Bannon for contempt — but Justice would be wrong to prosecute Juan Williams: Trump is killing American democracy MORE [R-Calif.] and he said, ‘I want some House folks to come as well.’ And then they picked up the conversation in the Oval Office,” the official said. “I couldn’t tell you if Lindsey Graham and Dick Durbin knew who was going to be in the meeting when they walked in. But the president definitely invited them.

“If they were surprised then they were surprised.”

Also attending the meeting were Rep. Mario Diaz-BalartMario Rafael Diaz-BalartAnother voice of reason retires Defense contractors ramp up donations to GOP election objectors Bottom line MORE (R-Fla.), a South Florida immigration reform advocate, and other members of the White House team, including Miller, chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenFar-left bullies resort to harassing, shaming Kyrsten Sinema — it won't work Ex-Trump official: 'No. 1 national security threat I've ever seen' is GOP Left-leaning group to track which companies hire former top Trump aides MORE and her acting chief of staff, Chad Wolf.

The offices of Durbin and Graham did not respond to requests for comment Friday.

The meeting came at a crucial time in the debate over the future of DACA. Both sides say they want to secure protections for the almost 800,000 immigrants who have benefitted from the program, but the debate has become entangled in sharp disagreements over the scope of the new immigration restrictions being pushed by Trump and conservatives on Capitol Hill.

The Graham-Durbin proposal attempts to thread the needle, coupling the DACA protections with new funding for border security as well as efforts to rein in family migration and scale back the diversity visa program — a four-tier approach demanded by Trump. But the proposal has done little to appease conservatives. Cotton has called the Graham-Durbin proposal “a joke,” and Trump this week also rejected the package.

“There was a deal proposed that didn’t meet our criteria, that didn’t really make the kind of progress on these four topics that we’re looking to make some sort of negotiation on,” the White House official said.

Durbin, undeterred, is vowing to push ahead with his proposal, which he and Graham plan to unveil next week, challenging GOP leaders to consider it.

“If the Republican leadership has a better alternative, bring it forward,” he told MSNBC on Friday. “If they don’t, for goodness sakes, give us a vote.”

He said he’d be calling colleagues in both parties “begging” for their support.

Yet Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell backs Herschel Walker in Georgia Senate race The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Democrats insist budget consensus close as talks drag on Manchin backs raising debt ceiling with reconciliation if GOP balks MORE (R-Ky.) has said he won’t consider any bill that doesn't have Trump's support. And the opponents of the bill are expecting him to follow through. Perdue laughed when asked if there’s a DACA deal.

“They may have an agreement among themselves,” he said. “There's no agreement with the president ... so there's no deal yet.”

Frank Sharry, executive director of America's Voice, a progressive pro-immigration advocacy group, accused Miller, Cotton and Goodlatte of conspiring to undermine any bipartisan DACA fix.

“They want to derail and defeat anything that helps Dreamers," he said, adding that a competing House bill introduced by Goodlatte “was designed and primed to destabilize and undercut the bipartisan deal.”

That bill, co-authored by Reps. Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho), Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulLawmakers praise upcoming establishment of cyber bureau at State Overnight Defense & National Security — Presented by Boeing — US 'deeply alarmed' by reports of military takeover in Sudan US 'deeply alarmed' by reports of military takeover in Sudan MORE (R-Texas) and Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyBusiness groups, sensing victory, keep up pressure over tax hikes Kelly raises million in third quarter Ruben Gallego is left's favorite to take on Sinema MORE (R-Ariz.), shares many of its enforcement provisions with Miller's White House memo.

Labrador told reporters Wednesday that the bill could garner the necessary votes to pass the House, especially following the GOP's successful passage of tax reform, if Republican leadership puts its weight behind it.

“[Leadership] should put it on the floor,” said Labrador. “Their job now is to help us whip the conference to make sure this happens. That’s the only thing that could unify the Republican conference."

“I think we could for sure get 218 Republicans,” he added.

Others say that’s quite unlikely.

“You’re not getting 218 [votes], that’s not happening,” said one Republican aide with knowledge of the talks. The aide said the bill is too heavy on enforcement provisions and doesn't give deportation relief to enough people to win 218 GOP votes.

“[Goodlatte] will say he didn’t put in the kitchen sink, which is technically correct, but it was pretty close,” said the aide.

Even if the Goodlatte bill does get through the House, it’s unlikely to draw the necessary nine Democrats to pass the Senate.

Jordain Carney contributed.