GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

Members of Congress en route to West Virginia for the GOP retreat quickly moved to help the people in a garbage truck that collided with their train.

Several Republican lawmakers on board had medical training, according to sources.

Local reports and a GOP aide on the train said there was at least one fatality and one serious injury among the people who were in the truck.

Aides on the train or in contact with their bosses who were passengers said there did not appear to be any injuries among people onboard. Some passengers bumped heads or hit the floor, but no serious injuries were reported.

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Photos from the scene showed that the truck storage detached from the passenger compartment entirely, with trash strewn all over the scene.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump asserts his power over Republicans 'Never Trump' Republicans: Fringe, or force to be reckoned with? The Memo: Can the Never Trumpers succeed? MORE (R-Ariz.) said on CNN that lawmakers helped secure one person on a stretcher.

“He was pretty bad off. I hope he survives,” Flake said.

Flake said paramedics tried to help the person in the truck who died, but they “couldn’t revive him.”

Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeHouse FISA bill suddenly on life support House GOP lawmaker breaks with party to back proxy voting House conservatives voice concerns over minority rights during remote hearings MORE (R-Okla.) also said on CNN that Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - US virus deaths exceed 100,000; Pelosi pulls FISA bill Stakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff Pass the Primary Care Enhancement Act MORE (R-La.) and Reps. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Moniz says U.S. needs energy jobs coalition and Manchin says Congress is pushing Wall Street solutions that don't work for Main Street; Burr to step aside The Hill's 12:30 Report: House returns to DC for coronavirus relief House leaders enact new safety precautions for votes MORE (R-Texas) and Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Sen. Coons says US needs to invest in vaccine manufacturing now; uncertainty looms over states reopening The Hill's Coronavirus Report: U.S. reaches grim milestone of 50,000 deaths; UAE Ambassador Yousef Al Otaiba says COVID-19 crisis creates opportunity with Iran The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Pfizer's Mikael Dolsten says vaccine development timeline being cut in half; House poised to pass 4 billion relief package MORE (R-Ohio) were among the lawmakers rushing to help.

"They were actually the first person on the scene as far as I could tell,” Cole said. “They were administering CPR to the folks who had been hurt in the crash."

It’s not the first that time Wenstrup, a former combat surgeon, applied his medical training during an emergency that occurred during his time as a member of Congress.

House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTop GOP lawmakers invite Blue Dogs to meet with China Task Force over coronavirus probe House pays tribute to late Congressman Sam Johnson on the floor Rep. Banks launches bid for RSC chairman MORE (R-La.) credited Wenstrup with saving his life at the GOP congressional baseball practice shooting last June. Wenstrup applied a tourniquet on Scalise’s gunshot wound, which helped staunch the bleeding before he made it to the hospital for surgery.

Rep. Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberrySave wildlife, save ourselves Lawmakers cry foul as Trump considers retreating from Open Skies Treaty Where do we go from here? Conservation can show the way MORE (R-Neb.), who was also on board the train, said the House chaplain, Patrick Conroy, was also on the train and went to be with the people injured.

“A number of members of Congress who are doctors tried to help,” Fortenberry added.

Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenBipartisan senators call for investigation of TikTok's child privacy policies Hillicon Valley: Facebook permanently shifting thousands of jobs to remote work | Congressional action on driverless cars hits speed bump during pandemic | Republicans grill TikTok over data privacy concerns Top Commerce Republicans grill TikTok parent company MORE (R-Ore.) also noted on Twitter that while he and most other lawmakers were "fine" after the crash, his colleagues had rushed to help others involved in the accident.