GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

Members of Congress en route to West Virginia for the GOP retreat quickly moved to help the people in a garbage truck that collided with their train.

Several Republican lawmakers on board had medical training, according to sources.

Local reports and a GOP aide on the train said there was at least one fatality and one serious injury among the people who were in the truck.

Aides on the train or in contact with their bosses who were passengers said there did not appear to be any injuries among people onboard. Some passengers bumped heads or hit the floor, but no serious injuries were reported.

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Photos from the scene showed that the truck storage detached from the passenger compartment entirely, with trash strewn all over the scene.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeTrump suggests Heller lost reelection bid because he was 'hostile' during 2016 presidential campaign Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Ariz.) said on CNN that lawmakers helped secure one person on a stretcher.

“He was pretty bad off. I hope he survives,” Flake said.

Flake said paramedics tried to help the person in the truck who died, but they “couldn’t revive him.”

Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeGOP dismisses polls showing losing battle on shutdown Bottom Line Dems hit GOP on health care with additional ObamaCare lawsuit vote MORE (R-Okla.) also said on CNN that Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyIvanka Trump to meet with GOP senators to discuss paid family leave legislation Bipartisan senators ask industry for information on surprise medical bills Virginia abortion bill reignites national debate MORE (R-La.) and Reps. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessHouse Dems to mull bills to overturn Trump ObamaCare actions Overnight Health Care: House set to vote on bill targeting drug companies for overcharging Medicaid | Dems press Trump officials on pre-existing conditions | Tobacco giant invests .8B in Canadian marijuana grower GOP struggles to find right Republican for Rules MORE (R-Texas) and Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupKey doctors group faces political risks on guns GOP announces members who will serve on House intel panel CNN host pushes back on GOP lawmaker’s claim: ‘Hold on, diseases are not pouring into the country' MORE (R-Ohio) were among the lawmakers rushing to help.

"They were actually the first person on the scene as far as I could tell,” Cole said. “They were administering CPR to the folks who had been hurt in the crash."

It’s not the first that time Wenstrup, a former combat surgeon, applied his medical training during an emergency that occurred during his time as a member of Congress.

House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTexas man with politician hit list, illegally 3D printed rifle sentenced to eight years The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Will there be any last-minute shutdown drama? Dems escalate gun fight a year after Parkland MORE (R-La.) credited Wenstrup with saving his life at the GOP congressional baseball practice shooting last June. Wenstrup applied a tourniquet on Scalise’s gunshot wound, which helped staunch the bleeding before he made it to the hospital for surgery.

Rep. Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryProfessor says GOP lawmaker’s office called him over ‘liking’ vandalized campaign sign In the wake of ISIS: Seeking to restore what is right and good for the Yazidis Fortenberry named chairman of legislative appropriations subcommittee in House MORE (R-Neb.), who was also on board the train, said the House chaplain, Patrick Conroy, was also on the train and went to be with the people injured.

“A number of members of Congress who are doctors tried to help,” Fortenberry added.

Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenFormer Ryan aide moves to K street Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Lawmakers pay tribute to John Dingell's legacy on health care | White House denies officials are sabotaging ObamaCare | FDA wants meeting with Juul, Altria execs on youth vaping House members hint at bipartisan net neutrality bill MORE (R-Ore.) also noted on Twitter that while he and most other lawmakers were "fine" after the crash, his colleagues had rushed to help others involved in the accident.