GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

GOP lawmakers help people injured in train crash

Members of Congress en route to West Virginia for the GOP retreat quickly moved to help the people in a garbage truck that collided with their train.

Several Republican lawmakers on board had medical training, according to sources.

Local reports and a GOP aide on the train said there was at least one fatality and one serious injury among the people who were in the truck.

Aides on the train or in contact with their bosses who were passengers said there did not appear to be any injuries among people onboard. Some passengers bumped heads or hit the floor, but no serious injuries were reported.

ADVERTISEMENT

Photos from the scene showed that the truck storage detached from the passenger compartment entirely, with trash strewn all over the scene.

Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeMcSally launches 2020 campaign Sinema will vote to convict Trump Senate drama surrounding Trump trial starts to fizzle MORE (R-Ariz.) said on CNN that lawmakers helped secure one person on a stretcher.

“He was pretty bad off. I hope he survives,” Flake said.

Flake said paramedics tried to help the person in the truck who died, but they “couldn’t revive him.”

Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeTrump's best week ever? McCarthy raises over million in Q4 for House GOP GOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' MORE (R-Okla.) also said on CNN that Sen. Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyThe Hill's Morning Report — AG Barr, GOP senators try to rein Trump in Overnight Health Care: Nevada union won't endorse before caucuses after 'Medicare for All' scrap | McConnell tees up votes on two abortion bills | CDC confirms 15th US coronavirus case Overnight Defense: Senate votes to rein in Trump war powers on Iran | Pentagon shifting .8B to border wall | US, Taliban negotiate seven-day 'reduction in violence' MORE (R-La.) and Reps. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Juul pitched products to Native American tribes | Vaping execs deny deliberately targeting young people | Republicans seek hearing on Medicaid block grants Overnight Health Care: Big Pharma looks to stem losses after trade deal defeat | House panel to examine federal marijuana policies | House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers Lawmakers express alarm over rise in cocaine overdose deaths MORE (R-Texas) and Brad WenstrupBrad Robert WenstrupOvernight Defense: Bolton, GOP senators see close ties challenged | Republicans fume over Dem maneuver on Iran bills |Trump criticizes Democrats over war powers vote GOP fumes over Democrats' maneuver for bringing up Iran bills Trump and Pelosi clash over Iran, impeachment MORE (R-Ohio) were among the lawmakers rushing to help.

"They were actually the first person on the scene as far as I could tell,” Cole said. “They were administering CPR to the folks who had been hurt in the crash."

It’s not the first that time Wenstrup, a former combat surgeon, applied his medical training during an emergency that occurred during his time as a member of Congress.

House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseBottom line Pelosi's staff huddles with aides in both parties on 'surprise' medical billing Republicans sense momentum after impeachment win MORE (R-La.) credited Wenstrup with saving his life at the GOP congressional baseball practice shooting last June. Wenstrup applied a tourniquet on Scalise’s gunshot wound, which helped staunch the bleeding before he made it to the hospital for surgery.

Rep. Jeff FortenberryJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FortenberryHouse Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death House Appropriations passes defense bill that would limit funds for border wall, pull US support from Yemen war Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill MORE (R-Neb.), who was also on board the train, said the House chaplain, Patrick Conroy, was also on the train and went to be with the people injured.

“A number of members of Congress who are doctors tried to help,” Fortenberry added.

Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenGOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans Coalition plan seeks to cut carbon emissions in half by 2035 Overnight Energy: Panel gives chairman power to subpoena Interior | House passes bill to protect wilderness | House Republicans propose carbon capture bill | Ocasio-Cortez introduces bill to ban fracking MORE (R-Ore.) also noted on Twitter that while he and most other lawmakers were "fine" after the crash, his colleagues had rushed to help others involved in the accident.