Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care

Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care
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A bipartisan group of New York lawmakers called on White House budget director Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump names new acting director of legislative affairs 12 things to know today about coronavirus Mulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus MORE to scrap a proposal in President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Barr says he didn't give 'tactical' command to clear Lafayette protesters MORE's proposed budget plan they say could threaten the health treatment of 9/11 first responders. 

New York Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingOn The Money: 3 million more Americans file for unemployment benefits | Sanders calls for Senate to 'improve' House Democrats' coronavirus bill | Less than 40 percent of small businesses have received emergency coronavirus loans GOP Rep. Pete King to buck party, vote for Democrats' coronavirus relief bill Bipartisan lawmakers call for Postal Service relief MORE (R), Jerrold Nadler (D) and Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyFired State Department watchdog says Pompeo aide attempted to 'bully' him over investigations Ousted watchdog says he told top State aides about Pompeo probe Overnight Health Care: White House shifts focus from coronavirus | House Democrats seek information on coronavirus vaccine contracts | Governors detail frustrations with Trump over COVID-19 supplies MORE (D) said they were "shocked and disturbed" by the proposal, which would see a realignment involving the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP).

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That program is currently housed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trump's 2019 budget proposal for NIOSH would move that agency into the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

That move could result in the shifting of employees from NIOSH to the NIH, impacting the 83,000 9/11 first responders who receive treatment and care from the World Trade Center Health Program.

"The proposal directly contradicts legislation Congress passed just three years ago to renew WTCHP for 75 years within NIOSH," the three lawmakers wrote in their letter to Mulvaney on Friday.

King, Nadler, and Maloney were the original sponsors of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Reauthorization Act, which works to provide health care and financial aid to 9/11's first responders. 

They said the budget proposal was made with no input from the 9/11 health-care community. 

"If you had spoken to us, or anyone in the 9/11 healthcare community, you would have understood that the World Trade Center Health Program is fully integrated with NIOSH and there are many shared NIOSH staff whose expertise would be lost if the WTCHP is pulled from NIOSH," the lawmakers said. 

"We also would have explained the amount of progress NIOSH has made in service delivery, all of which would be lost if WTCHP were removed from the institute."

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.