Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care

Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care
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A bipartisan group of New York lawmakers called on White House budget director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneySondland could provide more clues on Ukraine controversy Tensions flare as Democrats urge consumer bureau to boost penalties White House conducting probe into handling of Ukraine call transcript: report MORE to scrap a proposal in President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP congressman slams Trump over report that U.S. bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters US to restore 'targeted assistance' to Central American countries after migration deal Trump says lawmakers should censure Schiff MORE's proposed budget plan they say could threaten the health treatment of 9/11 first responders. 

New York Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingGOP lawmakers blast Trump's Syria decision as 'grave mistake,' 'disaster in the making' Here are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban Hotel industry mounts attack on Airbnb with House bill MORE (R), Jerrold Nadler (D) and Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyOn The Money: Tax, loan documents for Trump properties reportedly showed inconsistencies | Tensions flare as Dems hammer Trump consumer chief | Critics pounce as Facebook crypto project stumbles Commerce Department to develop stats on income inequality Tensions flare as Democrats urge consumer bureau to boost penalties MORE (D) said they were "shocked and disturbed" by the proposal, which would see a realignment involving the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP).

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That program is currently housed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trump's 2019 budget proposal for NIOSH would move that agency into the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

That move could result in the shifting of employees from NIOSH to the NIH, impacting the 83,000 9/11 first responders who receive treatment and care from the World Trade Center Health Program.

"The proposal directly contradicts legislation Congress passed just three years ago to renew WTCHP for 75 years within NIOSH," the three lawmakers wrote in their letter to Mulvaney on Friday.

King, Nadler, and Maloney were the original sponsors of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Reauthorization Act, which works to provide health care and financial aid to 9/11's first responders. 

They said the budget proposal was made with no input from the 9/11 health-care community. 

"If you had spoken to us, or anyone in the 9/11 healthcare community, you would have understood that the World Trade Center Health Program is fully integrated with NIOSH and there are many shared NIOSH staff whose expertise would be lost if the WTCHP is pulled from NIOSH," the lawmakers said. 

"We also would have explained the amount of progress NIOSH has made in service delivery, all of which would be lost if WTCHP were removed from the institute."

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.