Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care

Lawmakers call for withdrawal of Trump proposal that could impact 9/11 responders' health care
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A bipartisan group of New York lawmakers called on White House budget director Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE to scrap a proposal in President TrumpDonald TrumpCuban embassy in Paris attacked by gasoline bombs Trump Jr. inches past DeSantis as most popular GOP figure in new poll: Axios Trump endorses Ken Paxton over George P. Bush in Texas attorney general race MORE's proposed budget plan they say could threaten the health treatment of 9/11 first responders. 

New York Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingNewsmax anchor Greg Kelly to host New York radio show Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee Republican Garbarino wins election to replace retiring Rep. Pete King MORE (R), Jerrold Nadler (D) and Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn MaloneyOvernight Energy: Democrats request interview with Exxon lobbyist after undercover tapes | Biden EPA to reconsider Trump rollback on power plant pollution in 2022 | How climate change and human beings influence wildfires Democrats request interview with Exxon lobbyist after undercover tapes House bill targets US passport backlog MORE (D) said they were "shocked and disturbed" by the proposal, which would see a realignment involving the World Trade Center Health Program (WTCHP).

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That program is currently housed in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trump's 2019 budget proposal for NIOSH would move that agency into the National Institutes of Health (NIH). 

That move could result in the shifting of employees from NIOSH to the NIH, impacting the 83,000 9/11 first responders who receive treatment and care from the World Trade Center Health Program.

"The proposal directly contradicts legislation Congress passed just three years ago to renew WTCHP for 75 years within NIOSH," the three lawmakers wrote in their letter to Mulvaney on Friday.

King, Nadler, and Maloney were the original sponsors of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Reauthorization Act, which works to provide health care and financial aid to 9/11's first responders. 

They said the budget proposal was made with no input from the 9/11 health-care community. 

"If you had spoken to us, or anyone in the 9/11 healthcare community, you would have understood that the World Trade Center Health Program is fully integrated with NIOSH and there are many shared NIOSH staff whose expertise would be lost if the WTCHP is pulled from NIOSH," the lawmakers said. 

"We also would have explained the amount of progress NIOSH has made in service delivery, all of which would be lost if WTCHP were removed from the institute."

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.