GOP lawmaker calls for Ryan to bring up gun safety legislation

GOP lawmaker calls for Ryan to bring up gun safety legislation
© Camille Fine

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloHillicon Valley — Presented by CTIA and America's wireless industry — Lawmaker sees political payback in fight over 'deepfakes' measure | Tech giants to testify at hearing on 'censorship' claims | Google pulls the plug on AI council Lawmaker alleges political payback in failed 'deepfakes' measure Ex-GOP lawmaker joins marijuana trade group MORE (R-Fla.) is calling on Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE (R-Wis.) to allow the chamber to immediately consider gun safety legislation, citing President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE's professed support for such measures.

Curbelo tweeted that Ryan "should immediately allow the House to consider common sense gun safety proposals" that the Florida Republican has advocated, including raising the purchasing age of long guns to 21 and banning bump stocks, among other items.

Curbelo's plea came just over a week after a deadly shooting at a high school in Parkland, Fla., left 17 people dead and more than a dozen others wounded. The attack reignited an intense national debate over gun control laws and put pressure on politicians to act.

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In an interview with ABC's "This Week" on Sunday, Curbelo called for the House to hold debates on "reasonable, common-sense gun safety laws" that "protect rights for responsible citizens, people who are responsible gun owners, but will prevent those who want to do harm to innocent people from obtaining these weapons."

Curbelo introduced a bill last fall aimed at banning "bump stocks" – devices used to modify semi-automatic firearms to shoot more rapidly. That proposal came after a gunman used such a device to carry out a deadly attack on a Las Vegas music festival.

President Trump signaled a willingness this week to back new gun measures. He announced Tuesday that he had directed the Justice Department to propose regulations banning bump stocks and said Thursday that he "will be strongly pushing Comprehensive Background Checks with an emphasis on Mental Health."

He also called to raise the age for purchasing guns to 21. Under federal law, the minimum age to purchase long guns including rifles like AR-15s and shotguns from a licensed dealer is 18, but there's no minimum age when purchasing from an unlicensed dealer.