House GOP rejects calls for new gun legislation

House GOP rejects calls for new gun legislation
© Greg Nash

House Republicans brushed aside calls for stricter gun laws on Tuesday, signaling they want to focus on school security and figuring out why law enforcement failed to act on repeated warnings about the suspect in a mass shooting at a Florida high school this month.

At his weekly leadership news conference, Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHouse Ethics Committee informs Duncan Hunter he can no longer vote after guilty plea Duncan Hunter pleads guilty after changing plea Trump campaign steps up attacks on Biden MORE (R-Wis.) said the House had already acted on a bill to strengthen federal criminal background checks for gun purchases. And he suggested the House would not vote on legislation by Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGiffords, Demand Justice to pressure GOP senators to reject Trump judicial pick Senate confirms Trump pick labeled 'not qualified' by American Bar Association Feinstein endorses Christy Smith for Katie Hill's former House seat MORE (D-Calif.) and Rep. Ted DeutchTheodore (Ted) Eliot DeutchBipartisan lawmakers introduce amendment affirming US commitment to military aid to Israel Ethics sends memo to lawmakers on SCIF etiquette Pelosi signs bill making animal cruelty a federal crime MORE (D-Fla.) that would ban assault weapons.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We shouldn’t be banning guns from law-abiding citizens,” Ryan said at a news conference. “We should be focusing on making sure that citizens who should not get guns in the first place don’t get those guns.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE has backed a wide range of gun proposals following the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 people dead.

The students who survived the shooting have become powerful voices in the politically charged debate, taking their calls for action directly to cable television, the White House and Capitol Hill.

Trump has tentatively embraced improving how states report to the existing criminal background check system for gun purchases, raising the minimum age requirement to buy a semi-automatic weapon from 18 to 21 and banning devices that make such weapons fire much more rapidly.

Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsHouse passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Duncan Hunter pleads guilty after changing plea On The Money: Economy adds 136K jobs in September | Jobless rate at 50-year low | Treasury IG to probe handling of Trump tax returns request | House presses Zuckerberg to testify on digital currency MORE (R-N.Y.), a Trump ally, predicted many Republicans would “follow the lead of the president” if he chooses to forcefully get behind any single proposal.

But House Republicans who returned to Washington this week have so far shown little appetite to take up many of Trump’s ideas, casting doubts on whether the Parkland shooting might have represented a tipping point in the nation’s long debate on guns.

The House already passed the narrow background check measure supported by Trump, known as the Fix NICS (National Instant Criminal Background Check System) Act, but only after it was attached to controversial legislation to allow people to carry concealed weapons across state lines. The latter proposal kept the bill from passing the Senate.

Ryan said GOP leadership would wait to see what the Senate does with the bipartisan measure before deciding whether to consider the legislation as a stand-alone bill in the House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic challenger to Joni Ernst releases ad depicting her as firing gun at him Senate confirms eight Trump court picks in three days The case for censuring, and not impeaching, Donald Trump MORE (R-Ky.) wants to put the Fix NICS Act on the Senate floor, but Senate Democrats are demanding amendment votes in exchange for their cooperation and conservatives have voiced due process concerns with the bill, making it unclear whether even the most modest gun control effort will be able to pass.

Stricter gun proposals stand even less of a chance. House Republicans emerging from a GOP conference meeting on Tuesday threw cold water on the idea of imposing new age limits on gun purchases or banning assault weapons, saying such restrictions would not have prevented the Parkland attack.

“We need to put more effort into identifying potential shooters and tell local law enforcement to enforce the laws we already have,” said Rep. Joe BartonJoe Linus BartonLongtime GOP aide to launch lobbying shop Katie Hill resignation reignites push for federal 'revenge porn' law Shimkus says he's been asked to reconsider retirement MORE (R-Texas), who was shot at during a GOP baseball practice last summer.

Not every GOP member is shying away from gun restrictions.

Rep. Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastA new way to address veteran and military suicides VA might not be able to end veteran homelessness, but we shouldn't stop trying GOP lawmaker mistakenly wishes Navy happy birthday with photo of Russian ship MORE (R-Fla.), who supports banning assault weapons and raising the age requirement for purchasing certain rifles, said he presented some of his ideas to his colleagues. But he added that they were not met with “thunderous applause.”

GOP members prefer to focus their response on bolstering the safety and security on school campuses.

“We need to have people on the scene who are comfortable using weapons,” said Rep. Roger WilliamsJohn (Roger) Roger WilliamsSupreme Court poised to hear first major gun case in a decade Live coverage: Zuckerberg testifies before House on Facebook's Libra project Population shifts set up huge House battleground MORE (R-Texas). “We need to secure the schools now, because this debate is going to last a long time.”

Trump has similarly called for arming teachers with concealed weapons and ending gun-free school zones, which he says attract  would-be shooters.

Ryan said that while he personally backs Trump’s idea of arming teachers and faculty, he thinks the decision should be left up to local and state governments.

Still, there are a slate of other school security ideas being kicked around in Congress as Republicans start to craft their school safety bill.

Rep. Kay GrangerNorvell (Kay) Kay GrangerCongress hunts for path out of spending stalemate This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Lawmakers dismiss fresh fears of another government shutdown MORE (R-Texas) is drafting legislation that would encourage local school districts to buy and install metal detectors.

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsTrump, first lady take part in National Christmas Tree lighting Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown GOP lawmakers, Trump campaign rip 'liberal law professors' testifying in impeachment hearing MORE  (R-N.C.) said he has identified several potential solutions to harden security on school campuses, such as increasing funding for school resource officers and offering incentives for armed volunteers who want to help protect schools.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers also touted a measure on Tuesday that would provide federal funding for prevention programs designed to educate students and adults about how to spot and report warning signs of gun violence.

“Security requires a multilayered approach. Our bill supports one very important layer of that security for our schools,” Rep. John RutherfordJohn Henry RutherfordEd Markey, John Rutherford among victors at charity pumpkin-carving contest 'Mass shooting' at Florida video game tournament: authorities Carter, Yoder advance in appropriations committee leadership reshuffle MORE (R-Fla.), one of the bill’s co-sponsors, said at a press conference Tuesday.

In the aftermath of the Parkland shooting, House Republicans have also zeroed in on law enforcement’s botched response to the deadly rampage.

The FBI and local police have admitted that they received multiple warnings about the suspected shooter but failed to follow up on them.

It has also been reported that an armed officer stationed at the high school remained outside the building while the shooter was firing on students and teachers inside.

The House Judiciary and Oversight and Government Reform committees requested briefings from the FBI on its response to the incident, and are also planning to hold hearings on the issue.

“We need to get to the bottom of how these breakdowns occurred,” Ryan said. “We are going to be looking at the system failures.”

Scott Wong contributed.