Moulton: Pa. House election shows Dems 'can compete and win everywhere'

Moulton: Pa. House election shows Dems 'can compete and win everywhere'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonOvernight Defense: Senate panel adds B to Biden's defense budget | House passes bill to streamline visa process for Afghans who helped US | Pentagon confirms 7 Colombians arrested in Haiti leader's killing had US training Business, labor groups teaming in high-speed rail push Here's what Congress is reading at the beach this summer MORE (D-Mass.) said the results in the Pennsylvania House special election showed that “Democrats can compete and win everywhere.”

Moulton, who campaigned for Democrat Conor Lamb in the race, said that “on paper, [Conor Lamb] shouldn't have stood a chance in this district.”

“Tonight we learned that Democrats can compete and win everywhere — and that every vote counts,” Moulton tweeted. “I look forward to serving in Congress with Conor when all the votes are counted.”

 

 

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The Pennsylvania House election between Lamb and Republican Rick Saccone was declared too close to call Tuesday night, and absentee ballots will be counted into Wednesday to determine a winner.

However, the results are considered a warning sign for Republicans ahead of the 2018 midterm elections, after President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer New York state Senate candidate charged in riot Trump called acting attorney general almost daily to push election voter fraud claim: report GOP senator clashes with radio caller who wants identity of cop who shot Babbitt MORE won the district by nearly 20 points in the 2016 election.

Moulton had backed Lamb, a fellow veteran, in the race and campaigned for the Democratic candidate in Pennsylvania last week.

Both men have also been critical of House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTim Ryan slams McCarthy for mocking Capitol physician, mask mandate McCarthy knocks Pelosi, mask mandate: 'This House has broken the country's trust' Senate votes to take up infrastructure deal MORE (D-Calif.), with Lamb promising not to vote for Pelosi during her next leadership bid.

As of late Tuesday, Lamb had 111,875 votes to Saccone’s 111,028 votes — a margin of 847 votes with nearly all of them counted. However, absentee votes from GOP-leaning areas have yet to be counted, and it's unclear if those ballots will make up the difference.