Dem says frosted glass indicates lack of 'transparency' at CFPB

Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyFinancial policymakers must be suffering from amnesia On The Money: Broad coalition unites against Trump tariffs | Senate confirms new IRS chief | Median household income rose for third straight year in 2017 | Jamie Dimon's brief battle with Trump Eight weeks out: Dems see narrow path to Senate majority MORE, the acting head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), defended on Wednesday a decision to put frosted glass on the windows of his office, after he was confronted for a lack of "transparency" by Rep. Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonKavanaugh becomes September surprise for midterm candidates Trump Jr., Dem congressman spar over Ellison's association with Farrakhan Why did Clinton share the stage with Farrakhan? MORE (D-Minn.).

Ellison questioned Mulvaney at a House Financial Services Committee hearing about the decision to install frosted glass on the windows of 13 offices at the CFPB, asking whether doing so undermined his commitment to transparency. 

"You are the champion of transparency, right?" Ellison asked. "And yet you have obscured yourself physically, and I find that to be ironic, sir."

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Mulvaney said the windows of 13 offices had been frosted in recent months at a cost of $3,500. The frosted windows, he said, were part of a plan put together under his predecessor at the CFPB, Richard CordrayRichard Adams CordrayWealthiest Republican supporter in Ohio quits party Obama blasts GOP: They ‘put up with crazy’ On The Money: Lawmakers get deal to avoid shutdown | House panel approves 'tax cuts 2.0' bill | Jobless claims hold steady near 49-year low MORE.

Mulvaney then fired back at Ellison, asking whether the door to his office is transparent. 

"I’m not a witness today. You are," Ellison replied. 

"I’ve been to your office. I can’t see into it," Mulvaney quipped. 

The Associated Press reported Tuesday that the CFPB had spent $6,000 to frost the office windows of senior staff in recent months. The bureau reportedly ordered the film used to frost the windows in September 2017, before Cordray left the agency, and again in February, after Mulvaney took over.