House Republicans prepare to battle for leadership slots

House Republicans prepare to battle for leadership slots
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Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP super PAC drops .5 million on Nevada ad campaign Blue wave poses governing risks for Dems Dems seek to rebuild blue wall in Rust Belt contests MORE's (R-Wis.) retirement plans haven't just set off a shadow campaign for Speaker between his top deputies, Reps. Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOn The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Midterms to shake up top posts on House finance panel The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by United Against Nuclear Iran — Kavanaugh confirmation in sudden turmoil MORE (Calif.) and Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseOn The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Midterms to shake up top posts on House finance panel On The Money: Senate approves 4B spending bill | China imposes new tariffs on billion in US goods | Ross downplays new tariffs: 'Nobody's going to actually notice' MORE (La.). A slew of other ambitious Republicans are now eyeing slots on the leadership ladder, including the majority whip and conference chair posts.

No one has made any official announcement that they're running for leadership jobs, but lawmakers are putting out feelers, quietly gauging how much support they would have for a bid after the Nov. 6 election.

Colleagues have approached Rep. Jason SmithJason Thomas SmithRecord numbers of women nominated for governor, Congress House GOP starts summer break on a note of friction Overnight Energy: Fewer than half of school districts test for lead | Dems slam proposed changes to Endangered Species Act | FEMA avoids climate change when discussing plan for future storms MORE (R-Mo.), the conference secretary, about a possible bid for GOP whip, the No. 3 job, while Rep. Gary PalmerGary James PalmerOvernight Health Care: House votes to repeal medical device tax | Fierce ObamaCare critic joins administration | GOP senators target DC individual mandate The Hill's Morning Report — Russia furor grips Washington Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (R-Ala.), a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, is reaching out to friends about a bid for policy chairman, GOP sources said.

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There are also about a half-dozen Republicans said to be angling for conference chair, the No. 4 leadership spot occupied for the past three terms by Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersGOP: The economy will shield us from blue wave Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker Conservatives blame McCarthy for Twitter getting before favorable committee MORE (R-Wash.). They include a handful of younger rising stars, including Reps. Scott TaylorScott William TaylorVirginia reps urge Trump to declare federal emergency ahead of Hurricane Florence Virginia judge rules candidate's name must be removed from ballot due to fraud Pentagon, GOP breathe sign of relief after Trump cancels parade MORE (R-Va.), 38; and Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveUtah group complains Mia Love should face criminal penalties for improper fundraising Pregnant and imprisoned: The crisis thousands of women are facing Election Countdown: What to watch in final primaries | Dems launch M ad buy for Senate races | Senate seats most likely to flip | Trump slump worries GOP | Koch network's new super PAC MORE (R-Utah), 42; but also some veteran Republicans such as Rep. Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerCongress should provide parents an opportunity to care for newborn and adopted children Paid family leave could give new parents a much-needed lifeline Vulnerable Republicans include several up-and-coming GOP leaders MORE (R-Mo.), a former top Republican National Committee official and ambassador under former President George W. Bush, sources said. 

Rep. Mimi Walters (R-Calif.), a McCarthy ally who is the sophomore class’s representative to leadership, is also evaluating the leadership landscape, said a source familiar with her thinking. She could also run for conference chair if there is an opening, or for National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) chair if Rep. Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversHouse Dem campaign chief presses GOP on banning use of hacked materials Trump is wrong, Dems are fighting to save Medicare and Social Security Hillicon Valley: Ex-Trump campaign adviser gets 14 days in jail | Tesla stocks fall after Elon Musk smokes weed on video | Dem, GOP talks over hacked info break down | Russian extradited over massive financial hack | Whole Foods workers trying to unionize MORE (R-Ohio) doesn’t seek a second term leading the GOP’s campaign arm.

Walters is one of Stivers’s two top deputies at the NRCC, an organization that has never been led by a woman. 

“Obviously, it’s fluid,” a GOP aide said of the landscape.

In an attempt to avoid Republican infighting over the Speaker’s gavel, Ryan publicly backed McCarthy to be his successor last week — a move that led Scalise, the other possible contender for the top job, to also throw his support behind the majority leader.

But Ryan’s high-profile endorsement did little to quell jockeying for other slots further down the leadership ladder. If McCarthy or Scalise move up, that would reshuffle the decks and open up other spots on the leadership team.

That’s why, shortly after Ryan’s retirement announcement, the GOP’s youngest crop of House members started plotting ways to get a millennial lawmaker a seat at the leadership table. 

Lawmakers have floated Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikPelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor Preventing violence isn’t partisan: Time to reauthorize Violence Against Women Act Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless MORE (R-N.Y.), co-chair of the centrist Tuesday Group, as one possible contender for a leadership role. Stefanik has previously been approached by Republican leaders about potentially serving on the leadership team one day, according to one GOP source, though it’s unclear whether she would be open to the idea. 

Republican strategists think it would be a smart move for the GOP to add the 33-year-old Stefanik, the youngest woman ever elected to Congress, to its leadership ranks.

Taylor, another millennial lawmaker, is eyeing a bid for Republican conference chair, according to a source familiar with his thinking. But the former Navy SEAL, who has expressed frustration with the GOP’s messaging efforts, would also be willing to rally behind a fellow millennial candidate for the job, the source said.

“We need some of the millennial members of Congress at the table when the policy decisions are being made that will affect our generation as much as any,” said freshman Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzThe federal government must stop stifling medical marijuana research Hillicon Valley: Twitter chief faces GOP anger over bias | DOJ convenes meeting on bias claims | Rubio clashes with Alex Jones | DHS chief urges lawmakers to pass cyber bill | Sanders bill takes aim at Amazon Conservatives blame McCarthy for Twitter getting before favorable committee MORE (R-Fla.). "There are a lot of the younger members that I've had informal discussions with that would like to see a younger person pursue one of the leadership positions.” 

It’s unclear where McMorris Rodgers will land next year, but an aide to the congresswoman called such palace intrigue “divisive D.C. chatter” and said Republicans need to be focused on the GOP agenda and winning in November. 

Asked in a local radio interview this week whether she might run for Speaker, McMorris Rodgers declined to answer.

“My No. 1 priority is to continue working hard, getting results for the people of Eastern Washington, keeping our majority. That’s going to be my focus between now and the end of the year,” McMorris Rodgers told KTTH in Seattle

But she forcefully rejected rumors that she’s following Ryan into retirement.

“Those that are hoping that I’m going to retire or spreading that rumor hoping that I’ll retire are going to be really disappointed because, yes, I am running for reelection,” she said.

Then there’s the Freedom Caucus. Some members in the group of conservative hard-liners are seeking to cut a deal with McCarthy. These conservatives say they would back McCarthy’s bid for Speaker in exchange for his support in making one of them majority leader or whip, GOP sources said. 

The group tried to strike a similar agreement with McCarthy when he ran for Speaker in 2015, but the California Republican abruptly dropped his bid after realizing he could not meet all of the conservatives’ demands. 

While the No. 2 or No. 3 leadership spot might be a tough ask, the Freedom Caucus could still demand slots on powerful committees like Rules or Steering. The Speaker-controlled Rules panel dictates in what form a bill is brought to the House floor; the Steering panel decides who wins coveted committee chairmanships and seats. 

“They’re going to want committee slots; I think that is going to be the ask,” said a GOP aide with ties to the Freedom Caucus. “I don’t think committee chairman is what they are going to ask for. They want to put soldiers in across the board and use that influence better.” 

Just as Palmer is mulling a bid for policy chairman, the GOP source said other Freedom Caucus members may also run for other lower-level leadership posts, including GOP conference chair, vice chair and secretary. Those who occupy those jobs get a seat at the Speaker’s weekly leadership meeting, where final policy decisions are often made.  

“I don’t think it’s a play for power. It’s just an organic thing from members,” the GOP aide said. “It’s not an ideological ax to grind. It’s just members saying they think this organization could be run differently.”