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House lawmakers push for medical marijuana research reform

House lawmakers push for medical marijuana research reform
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A bipartisan group of House lawmakers on Thursday advocated for the passage of a medical marijuana research bill. 

The legislation, spearheaded by Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzGiuliani has discussed possible pardon with Trump: report Hannity urges Trump to pardon himself Gaetz: Trump 'should pardon everyone' including himself to quash liberal 'bloodlust' MORE (R-Fla.), would require the attorney general to assess whether there's an adequate supply of research-grade cannabis annually for researchers and institutions to look into its medicinal uses. 

Gaetz said 25 members have signed on to the legislation, which has received the support of House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteBottom line No documents? Hoping for legalization? Be wary of Joe Biden Press: Trump's final presidential pardon: himself MORE (R-Va.).

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"One of the reasons I'm so enthusiastic is that we really do have a broad base of support for this bill from Republicans and Democrats, from moderates, conservatives, liberals, libertarians," Gaetz said.

"And I'm hopeful that by finding the area with the common ground, the theory that we ought to create protections for research, that we'll be able to make some progress on this very important issue."

Proponents of the bill argue medical marijuana could be beneficial for veterans, elderly people and those suffering from chronic illnesses.

"We know cannabis is good medicinally for a lot of things: epilepsy, seizures, cancer, appetite. And you talk [to] our veterans; they prefer cannabis to opioids," Rep. Lou CorreaJose (Lou) Luis CorreaCriminalization that never should have been: Cannabis Man arrested, charged with threatening to attack Muslims in Germany Gloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California MORE (D-Calif.) told reporters, adding that countries including Israel and Canada have embraced using cannabis for medical purposes. 

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members House adjusts format for dinner with new members after criticism Former GOP congressman calls for Biden to receive presidential briefings MORE (R-Fla.) said he believes it's important that the government doesn't stand in the way of studies looking into marijuana's potential benefits.

"We do need to learn more. We need more research," he said. "What we don't need is a federal government-led witch hunt against those who are following state laws, those who want to conduct research and those who want to inform the public."

Rep. Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeFeinstein pushes for California secretary of state to replace Harris in Senate Battle for Pentagon post in Biden Cabinet heats up Louisville mayor declares racism a public health crisis MORE (D-Calif.) said she thinks it's an area where both sides can come together to help advocate for the advancement of medicine.

"We may not agree on every aspect of cannabis legislation, but at the very least we should be able to conduct research and our veterans should be allowed to benefit from these trials that are also a part of this legislation," she said.