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House Dems accuse GOP of myriad oversight failures on Trump

House Dems accuse GOP of myriad oversight failures on Trump
© Greg Nash

House Democrats are turning up the heat on Republicans, accusing them of negligent oversight of President TrumpDonald John TrumpPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Sunday shows preview: US health officials brace for post-holiday COVID-19 surge MORE in hopes the charge of “complicity” resonates with voters in November. 

Behind Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiClub for Growth to launch ad blitz in Georgia to juice GOP turnout Governors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight MORE (Calif.), the Democrats on Monday released an extensive memo designed to lay out their case that, when it comes to holding the administration accountable, Republicans have abandoned their role in order to protect their ally in the White House.

The compendium — entitled “Complicit: House GOP’s Reckless Campaign to Cover-up for President Trump” — touches on a wide range of issues where the party finds Republican oversight either lacking or nonexistent. They’re billing the effort as a collection of “low points in the GOP’s efforts to aid and abet Trump’s corruption.”

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In pursuing the strategy, Democratic leaders are attempting a delicate balancing act. While taking pains not to make the midterm elections a referendum on Trump himself — a strategy that backfired on the party in 2016 — they’re attacking Capitol Hill Republicans for soft-pedaling the many controversies swirling around the president and his administration.

The new memo highlights a laundry list of such issues, focused largely on Trump’s repeated attacks on the Justice Department, which have been echoed by a number of Republican lawmakers, and his efforts to debunk the ongoing investigation into potential ties between his campaign and the Russians who sought to sink the 2016 campaign of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGroups seek to get Black vote out for Democrats in Georgia runoffs Biden's political position is tougher than Trump's Valadao unseats Cox in election rematch MORE.

Democrats are singling out Rep. Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesBiden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls Overnight Defense: Trump loyalist to lead Pentagon transition | Democrats ask VA for vaccine distribution plan | Biden to get classified intel reports Ex-Nunes aide linked to Biden conspiracy theories will lead Pentagon transition MORE (R-Calif.) for particular scrutiny. Nunes, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, has become a star in the eyes of conservatives for his biting criticisms of the Russia probe, led by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE, and his own memo accusing the FBI of misconduct in its investigation of former Trump adviser Carter Page.

“This piece of propaganda,” the Democrats charge, “sought to discredit the Department of Justice and the ongoing Russia investigation.”

The Democrats are also taking on Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteBottom line No documents? Hoping for legalization? Be wary of Joe Biden Press: Trump's final presidential pardon: himself MORE (R-Va.) — who has refused to hold hearings on Russia’s election interference while pursuing a series of probes into Clinton — and Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyThe Hunter Biden problem won't go away Sunday shows preview: Joe Biden wins the 2020 election Sunday shows preview: Election integrity dominates as Nov. 3 nears MORE (R-S.C.), who has blocked dozens of Democratic subpoena requests for information related to Moscow’s meddling and Trump’s business interests, among other issues.

Democratic voters were riled up by Trump’s surprise ascension to the White House, and party leaders are hoping to build on that energy — and expand their base — by promising a tough new oversight regime if they win the House in November. 

“Having Democrats in control of the House of Representatives will be about accountability and oversight of the executive branch, something that has been — not lacking — it's woefully lacking,” Rep. Joseph Crowley (N.Y.), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, told reporters recently.

Highlighting the limits of their anti-Trump campaign, however, Democratic leaders have sought to discourage any talk of impeaching the president, warning that it could backfire at the polls if Trump’s conservative base becomes invigorated over the threat that Democrats would try to oust the president as a first act in the majority. Indeed, a number of Republicans are running their campaigns on that very message. 

“There’s no doubt they will [try to impeach],” Rep. Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTop Republicans praise Trump's Flynn pardon Richmond says GOP 'reluctant to stand up and tell the emperor he wears no clothes' New RSC chairman sees 'Trumpism' as future MORE (La.), the Republican whip, told the conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt last week. “They’ve telegraphed a lot of that. Their base is so far radical to the left.”

Thus far, the Democratic impeachment champions on Capitol Hill — urged on by the party’s liberal base — have ignored the leadership warnings. 

Reps. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDe Blasio mum on whether he'll block sale of Mets to controversial investor Two ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL MORE (D-Tenn.) and Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralLawmakers call for small business aid at all levels of government The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy On the Money: Administration to ban TikTok, WeChat | House moves toward bill to avoid government shutdown | Coronavirus relief bills boosted GDP, CBO says MORE (D-N.Y.) are planning a public forum in New York City next week to magnify their impeachment message. And Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenRemoving slurs, bigotry from places on our maps paves the way to remove them from all aspects of our lives Safeguarding US elections by sanctioning Russian sovereign debt The Memo: Trump furor stokes fears of unrest MORE (D-Texas) on Monday took the remarkable step of going after Pelosi for her entreaties to silence the impeachment talk. Green, a member of the Congressional Black Caucus who’s accused Trump of sowing racial divisions, took issue with Pelosi’s recent assessment that impeachment demands more serious offenses than “being a jerk.”

“He’s not just some ‘jerk,’ ” Green said. “He’s the president of the United States with a bigoted policy agenda.”