Ryan, McCarthy push back on reports of leadership coup

Ryan, McCarthy push back on reports of leadership coup
© Greg Nash

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGaetz tells CPAC he won't take PAC money Paul Ryan says he disagrees with Romney's impeachment vote Trump doubles down on Neil Cavuto attacks: 'Will he get the same treatment as' Shep Smith? MORE (R-Wis.) on Tuesday pushed back against reports that some Republicans want him to give up the gavel before November, arguing that holding leadership elections before the midterms would be “divisive” for the GOP conference.

“Obviously I serve at the pleasure of the members. Those are the people who drafted me in this job in the first place,” Ryan told reporters. “But I think we all agree, the best thing for us is to complete our agenda and not wedge into the middle of the completion of our agenda divisive leadership elections.”

The Weekly Standard reported over the weekend that House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyCongress eyes billion to billion to combat coronavirus Lawmakers race to pass emergency coronavirus funding Warren introduces bill to redirect wall money to coronavirus MORE (R-Calif.) and some White House officials were weighing an effort to push out Ryan before he retires in January so that McCarthy could take over as Speaker. That plan would also put Democrats on the record voting for Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — California monitoring 8,400 people for coronavirus | Pence taps career official to coordinate response | Dems insist on guardrails for funding Overnight Energy: Murkowski, Manchin unveil major energy bill | Lawmakers grill EPA chief over push to slash agency's budget | GOP lawmaker accuses Trump officials of 'playing politics' over Yucca Mountain Hillicon Valley — Presented by Facebook — Federal court rules tech giants can censor content | Trump upends surveillance fight | Senate passes bill barring federal funds for Huawei equipment MORE (D-Calif.) before the midterms.

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Office of Management and Budget Director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyWhite House preparing to ask Congress for funds to combat coronavirus: report Tucker Carlson calls out Mick Mulvaney on immigration remarks: 'Dishonest and stupid' Trump furious after officials allowed Americans with coronavirus to fly home with other passengers: report MORE appeared to back up some of the reporting during a conference sponsored by The Weekly Standard, saying he has discussed the idea of Ryan handing over the gavel to his successor before November.

"I've talked with Kevin about this privately but not as much publicly,” Mulvaney reportedly said. “Wouldn't it be great to force a Democrat running in a tight race to have to put up or shut up about voting for Nancy Pelosi eight weeks before an election? That's a really, really good vote for us to force if we can figure out how to do it."

McCarthy vehemently denied the report on Tuesday.

“I read that report. That report is not true,” McCarty said, standing alongside Ryan. “I think you’re building something in that’s not out there. But I understand the job you have to do. I just think if you look at what we’re doing this week … it’s a clear example that none of that is true.”

There is a sense among some Republicans that Ryan’s power over the Republican conference has been waning since he announced his retirement in April. Conservatives tanked a GOP farm bill last week, while centrist Republicans are trying to force immigration votes with a discharge petition. 

But Ryan argued that legislation sometimes fails — including the last farm bill — and also pointed out that the House is poised to pass prison reform, "right to try" legislation, Dodd-Frank reform and a massive defense policy bill this week.

“Look at what we’re doing just this week. That’s four things just this week,” Ryan said.

But, according to Republicans who attended a GOP conference meeting on Tuesday, Ryan expressed frustration behind closed doors with both the farm bill fiasco and the insurgent effort to force immigration votes

“He was frustrated … I think he used the word 'crap' once. For Paul Ryan, 'crap' is pretty blue language,” said Rep. Mark AmodeiMark Eugene AmodeiOn The Trail: Democrats plan to hammer Trump on Social Security, Medicare Billboards calling on House Republicans to 'do their job' follow members home for Thanksgiving Trump's defenders are running out of options MORE (R-Nev.). “He said we need to start acting like we’re in charge of the place and being divided doesn’t help.”

Sources said Ryan during the meeting highlighted some of the GOP’s accomplishments and urged unity among Republicans, saying it’s critical that they come together as a team.

After his remarks, everyone stood up and applauded, according to a person inside the room.