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Paul Ryan: Gowdy's statement contradicting Trump on spying claims is 'accurate'

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanOn The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire Trump faces test of power with early endorsements Lobbying world MORE (R-Wis.) on Wednesday pushed back against President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE’s “spygate” claims, siding with Rep. Trey GowdyTrey GowdyPompeo rebukes Biden's new foreign policy The Hunter Biden problem won't go away Sunday shows preview: Joe Biden wins the 2020 election MORE’s (R-S.C.) defense of the FBI’s investigation into Trump’s campaign and Russia.

“Chairman Gowdy’s initial assessment is accurate, but we have more digging to do,” Ryan told reporters during his weekly news conference.

While both Ryan and Gowdy received a closed-door briefing on the bureau’s use of an informant in the investigation, there is still an outstanding request to view the underlying documents to support the briefing.

"We have some more documents to review. We still have some unanswered questions... If we got all the information we were looking for, we could wrap this up faster," Ryan said.

"I have seen no evidence to the contrary of the initial assessment Chairman Gowdy has made. But I want to make sure that we run every lead down and make sure we get final answers to these questions."

A week after the closed-door briefing, Gowdy told CBS News that he had seen no evidence to support Trump’s claims that a “spy” was improperly inserted into his 2016 campaign.

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The Oversight and Government Reform Committee chairman, who is retiring, said he did not believe the FBI had done anything out of bounds in its investigation, and defended the use of informants by the bureau and other law enforcement agencies.

"That is not a term I've ever used in the criminal justice system," Gowdy said.

“I’ve never heard the term ‘spy’ used. Undercover informant, confidential informant, those are all words I'm familiar with. I've never heard the term 'spy' used," he added.

Trump and a number of House conservatives, however, have seized on revelations that the FBI used a confidential informant in its investigation into the Trump campaign and Russia, alleging that a “spy” was improperly planted into the campaign.