Progressives poised to shape agenda if Dems take back House

Progressives poised to shape agenda if Dems take back House

Move over, House Freedom Caucus. Progressive lawmakers are poised to play a pivotal role in the next Congress if Democrats take back the House in November.

That’s because a dozen members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) are in line to chair congressional committees, which would give the left-leaning group immense power to influence the chamber’s legislative agenda and strengthen their hand as chief antagonists to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump on Kanye West's presidential run: 'He is always going to be for us' Marie Yovanovitch on Vindman retirement: He 'deserved better than this. Our country deserved better than this' Trump says Biden has been 'brainwashed': 'He's been taken over by the radical left' MORE.

The stunning primary victory of self-described democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over Rep. Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyBowman declares victory over Engel in New York primary as votes still counted Progressives riding high as votes tabulated in NY, Kentucky The Hill's Campaign Report: Primary night in Kentucky and New York MORE (D-N.Y.) has also opened up a coveted spot at the leadership table, bolstering the argument that progressives should have more representation in the party’s top ranks.

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Some congressional observers are predicting that congressional progressives could emerge as the liberal equivalent of the House Freedom Caucus, a group that has been highly effectively at pushing the GOP further to the right by banding together as a conservative voting bloc.

“The Freedom Caucus has been a big player in the House because of the big Republican advances in 2010,” said Brad Bannon, a Democratic strategist. “I think that’s a good analogy for what will happen with the Democratic members.”

The Freedom Caucus, a group of roughly 30 conservative rabble-rousers, was launched in the years following the 2010 tea party wave that swept the Republicans back into power on Capitol Hill. 

Now, many members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus believe their political star is on the rise, with some election experts predicting a blue wave this fall, largely fueled by anti-Trump energy on the left. 

The CPC has 76 voting members in the House, and the caucus is expecting to add more lawmakers to its ranks next year after endorsing 28 candidates, like Ocasio-Cortez, this election cycle.

Some of the key issues the CPC has been championing include Medicare for all, free college tuition, lower prescription drug costs, criminal justice reform and a massive infrastructure program.

Several progressive lawmakers are in prime positions to advance legislation in those areas if Democrats win the House in the midterm elections.

Twelve CPC members hold the top-ranking Democratic seat on a committee, and 30 others are ranking members on a subcommittee.

That list includes Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersSupreme Court rulings reignite Trump oversight wars in Congress On The Money: Mnuchin, Powell differ over how soon economy will recover | Millions fear eviction without more aid from Congress | IRS chief pledges to work on tax code's role in racial wealth disparities Millions fear eviction without more aid from Congress MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Financial Services Committee and a favorite among the party’s young, liberal base, in large part because of her early calls for Trump’s impeachment and viral showdowns with administration officials. 

As ranking member, the Los Angeles lawmaker has called for subpoenaing records from Deutsche Bank to explore any Trump financial ties to Russia. As head of the committee, she would have greater control over those kinds of document requests. 

“Even if Democrats only take back control of the House by three seats, it still gives them enormous power because of the role Congress has in investigations,” Bannon said. “You’re going to see subpoenas flying out to the White House like confetti.”

Other CPC members who hold top Democratic posts on key committees include Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerNadler: Barr dealings with Berman came 'awfully close to bribery' Nadler wins Democratic primary Voters must strongly reject the president's abuses by voting him out this November MORE (N.Y.) on Judiciary; Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsFacial recognition tools under fresh scrutiny amid police protests The sad spectacle of Trump's enablers Democrat Kweisi Mfume wins House primary in Maryland MORE (Md.) on Oversight and Government Reform; Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneDem chairmen urge CMS to prevent nursing homes from seizing stimulus payments Federal watchdog finds cybersecurity vulnerabilities in FCC systems Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Deal on surprise medical bills faces obstacles | House GOP unveils rival drug pricing measure ahead of Pelosi vote | Justices to hear case over billions in ObamaCare payments MORE (N.J.) on Energy and Commerce; and Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioShould the United States withdraw from the WTO? OVERNIGHT ENERGY: House approves .5T green infrastructure plan | Rubio looks to defense bill to block offshore drilling, but some fear it creates a loophole | DC-area lawmakers push for analysis before federal agencies can be relocated Republicans score procedural victory on Democrats' infrastructure bill MORE (Ore.) on Transportation and Infrastructure. 

Meanwhile, Rep. Jim McGovern (Mass.), another progressive lawmaker, is the ranking member on the powerful Rules Committee, which serves as the gateway for most bills before they come to the House floor for a vote.

The Progressive Caucus could take a page out of the Freedom Caucus playbook by banding together to sink any legislation that doesn’t meet their standards.

But progressive lawmakers say that they would rather play an influential role by working with party leadership to help shape the Democratic agenda -- or better yet, have a spot at the leadership table themselves.

Some of the names floated for leadership positions include Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: DC's Bowser says protesters and nation were 'assaulted' in front of Lafayette Square last month; Brazil's Bolsonaro, noted virus skeptic, tests positive for COVID-19 Steyer endorses Markey in Massachusetts Senate primary Celebrities fundraise for Markey ahead of Massachusetts Senate primary MORE (Wis.), co-chairman of the progressive caucus; Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalDemocrats fear US already lost COVID-19 battle Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE (Wash.), vice-chairwoman of the group; and Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaSome in Congress want to keep sending our troops to Afghanistan House panel votes to limit Trump's Germany withdrawal It's time to eliminate land-based nuclear missiles MORE (Calif.), a first-term lawmaker from the Bay Area who endorsed both Crowley and Ocasio-Cortez in the New York primary. 

“There’s going to be a lot of members who are going to want to see more progressive policies become a part of the Democratic platform,” Khanna told The Hill. “It’s important we have a progressive member in leadership.”

Even before primary season began, frustrated rank-and-file Democrats had been clamoring for a change in the party’s entrenched leadership, where the top three lawmakers are all in their 70s and have held a firm grip on power for more than a decade.

Progressive lawmakers say the identity of the Democratic party is clearly changing, and they argue that leadership should better reflect the makeup of the caucus, especially if the incoming class is more progressive, younger and has more women. 

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSupreme Court rulings reignite Trump oversight wars in Congress Pelosi on Baltimore's Columbus statue: 'If the community doesn't want the statue, the statue shouldn't be there' Pelosi says House won't cave to Senate on worker COVID-19 protections MORE (D-Calif.) has been quick to defend her liberal bona fides in the wake of Crowley’s loss to Ocasio-Cortez.

“I’m female. I’m progressive. What's your problem?” Pelosi told reporters at a press conference last week.

But if Pelosi and her leadership team don’t aggressively push for progressive priorities next year, Khanna says the CPC will have another tool at its disposal to keep leadership in check: social media.

Khanna pointed out that Ocasio-Cortez and other progressive candidates have massive followings on social media and significant grassroots support, which could help keep outside pressure on leadership to pursue progressive policies.

“You have a lot of these new members who have extraordinary national followings and will be able to mobilize hundreds of thousands of people around policies,” Khanna said. “And that’s a new currency of influence that has been undervalued in Washington.”

“Colleagues are going to want to listen to those individuals,” he added.