Progressives poised to shape agenda if Dems take back House

Progressives poised to shape agenda if Dems take back House

Move over, House Freedom Caucus. Progressive lawmakers are poised to play a pivotal role in the next Congress if Democrats take back the House in November.

That’s because a dozen members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus (CPC) are in line to chair congressional committees, which would give the left-leaning group immense power to influence the chamber’s legislative agenda and strengthen their hand as chief antagonists to President TrumpDonald John TrumpRosenstein expected to leave DOJ next month: reports Allies wary of Shanahan's assurances with looming presence of Trump States file lawsuit seeking to block Trump's national emergency declaration MORE.

The stunning primary victory of self-described democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez over Rep. Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyGOP lawmaker: Amazon would be moving into NY if Ocasio-Cortez wasn't elected Crowley says he 'didn’t underestimate' Ocasio-Cortez in primary challenge Ocasio-Cortez on 2020: ‘I don’t want to be placated as a progressive’ MORE (D-N.Y.) has also opened up a coveted spot at the leadership table, bolstering the argument that progressives should have more representation in the party’s top ranks.

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Some congressional observers are predicting that congressional progressives could emerge as the liberal equivalent of the House Freedom Caucus, a group that has been highly effectively at pushing the GOP further to the right by banding together as a conservative voting bloc.

“The Freedom Caucus has been a big player in the House because of the big Republican advances in 2010,” said Brad Bannon, a Democratic strategist. “I think that’s a good analogy for what will happen with the Democratic members.”

The Freedom Caucus, a group of roughly 30 conservative rabble-rousers, was launched in the years following the 2010 tea party wave that swept the Republicans back into power on Capitol Hill. 

Now, many members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus believe their political star is on the rise, with some election experts predicting a blue wave this fall, largely fueled by anti-Trump energy on the left. 

The CPC has 76 voting members in the House, and the caucus is expecting to add more lawmakers to its ranks next year after endorsing 28 candidates, like Ocasio-Cortez, this election cycle.

Some of the key issues the CPC has been championing include Medicare for all, free college tuition, lower prescription drug costs, criminal justice reform and a massive infrastructure program.

Several progressive lawmakers are in prime positions to advance legislation in those areas if Democrats win the House in the midterm elections.

Twelve CPC members hold the top-ranking Democratic seat on a committee, and 30 others are ranking members on a subcommittee.

That list includes Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersPrivate insurance plays a critical part in home mortgage ecosystem On The Money: Lawmakers closing in on border deal | Dems build case for Trump tax returns | Trump, Xi won't meet before trade deadline | Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony on lifting of sanctions on Russian firms MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Financial Services Committee and a favorite among the party’s young, liberal base, in large part because of her early calls for Trump’s impeachment and viral showdowns with administration officials. 

As ranking member, the Los Angeles lawmaker has called for subpoenaing records from Deutsche Bank to explore any Trump financial ties to Russia. As head of the committee, she would have greater control over those kinds of document requests. 

“Even if Democrats only take back control of the House by three seats, it still gives them enormous power because of the role Congress has in investigations,” Bannon said. “You’re going to see subpoenas flying out to the White House like confetti.”

Other CPC members who hold top Democratic posts on key committees include Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTrump should beware the 'clawback' Congress House Judiciary Dems seek answers over Trump's national emergency declaration Omar apologizes after Dem leaders blast tweets as 'anti-Semitic' MORE (N.Y.) on Judiciary; Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsHouse chairman: Trump lawyers may have given false info about Cohen payments Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment Rule change sharpens Dem investigations into Trump MORE (Md.) on Oversight and Government Reform; Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneHigh stakes as Trump, Dems open drug price talks Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Lawmakers pay tribute to John Dingell's legacy on health care | White House denies officials are sabotaging ObamaCare | FDA wants meeting with Juul, Altria execs on youth vaping Hillicon Valley: Dems ready to subpoena Trump Tower meeting phone records | Dems, Whitaker in standoff over testimony | Bezos accuses National Enquirer of 'extortion' | Amazon offers rules for facial recognition | Apple releases FaceTime fix MORE (N.J.) on Energy and Commerce; and Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioThis is your captain speaking: We can’t allow another government shutdown Aviation groups push bill that would fund FAA during shutdown With highway funding in decline, mileage-based fees offer a solution MORE (Ore.) on Transportation and Infrastructure. 

Meanwhile, Rep. Jim McGovern (Mass.), another progressive lawmaker, is the ranking member on the powerful Rules Committee, which serves as the gateway for most bills before they come to the House floor for a vote.

The Progressive Caucus could take a page out of the Freedom Caucus playbook by banding together to sink any legislation that doesn’t meet their standards.

But progressive lawmakers say that they would rather play an influential role by working with party leadership to help shape the Democratic agenda -- or better yet, have a spot at the leadership table themselves.

Some of the names floated for leadership positions include Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanHannity decries Green New Deal as 'economically guaranteed-to-be-devastating' Ocasio-Cortez unveils Green New Deal climate resolution Trump’s AIDS turnaround greeted with skepticism by some advocates MORE (Wis.), co-chairman of the progressive caucus; Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Push for cosponsors for new 'Medicare for all' bill | Court lets Dems defend ObamaCare | Flu season not as severe as last year, CDC says Democrats seek cosponsors for new 'Medicare for all' bill Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Utah tests Trump on Medicaid expansion | Dems roll out Medicare buy-in proposal | Medicare for all could get hearing next month | Doctors group faces political risks on guns MORE (Wash.), vice-chairwoman of the group; and Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaOvernight Defense: House votes to end US support for Saudis in Yemen | Vote puts Trump in veto bind | Survey finds hazards in military housing | Senators offer new bill on Russia sanctions House passes bill to end US support for Saudi war in Yemen Congress poised to put Trump in veto bind MORE (Calif.), a first-term lawmaker from the Bay Area who endorsed both Crowley and Ocasio-Cortez in the New York primary. 

“There’s going to be a lot of members who are going to want to see more progressive policies become a part of the Democratic platform,” Khanna told The Hill. “It’s important we have a progressive member in leadership.”

Even before primary season began, frustrated rank-and-file Democrats had been clamoring for a change in the party’s entrenched leadership, where the top three lawmakers are all in their 70s and have held a firm grip on power for more than a decade.

Progressive lawmakers say the identity of the Democratic party is clearly changing, and they argue that leadership should better reflect the makeup of the caucus, especially if the incoming class is more progressive, younger and has more women. 

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDonald Trump proved himself by winning fight for border security Trump should beware the 'clawback' Congress The national emergency will haunt Republicans come election season MORE (D-Calif.) has been quick to defend her liberal bona fides in the wake of Crowley’s loss to Ocasio-Cortez.

“I’m female. I’m progressive. What's your problem?” Pelosi told reporters at a press conference last week.

But if Pelosi and her leadership team don’t aggressively push for progressive priorities next year, Khanna says the CPC will have another tool at its disposal to keep leadership in check: social media.

Khanna pointed out that Ocasio-Cortez and other progressive candidates have massive followings on social media and significant grassroots support, which could help keep outside pressure on leadership to pursue progressive policies.

“You have a lot of these new members who have extraordinary national followings and will be able to mobilize hundreds of thousands of people around policies,” Khanna said. “And that’s a new currency of influence that has been undervalued in Washington.”

“Colleagues are going to want to listen to those individuals,” he added.