Women poised to take charge in Dem majority

If Democrats win the House in November, 35 women are poised to lead committees and subcommittees in the next Congress — an historically high figure that would put female lawmakers in the driver's seat for some of the most pressing issues facing Congress and the country.

That number would almost triple the amount of GOP women currently holding similar positions, and it would mark a measurable achievement for Democratic lawmakers looking to take the “Year of the Woman” to new heights of power.

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The shift also would come at the outset of a crucial 2020 presidential cycle, when Democrats want to topple President TrumpDonald John TrumpJustice Department preparing for Mueller report as soon as next week: reports Smollett lawyers declare 'Empire' star innocent Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration MORE — a radioactive figure in the eyes of many women’s groups — and use a long-elusive House majority to battle against the administration on issues as diverse as abortion rights, family separations at the U.S. border and the ongoing probe into Russia's election meddling.

Trump's unexpected victory in 2016 sparked a wave of interest from female candidates, who have jumped into races around the country, increasing the odds of a record number of women occupying congressional seats next year. And while much of the election-year discussion has been focused on those potential newcomers, a shift in legislative power to veteran lawmakers would likely prove even more significant.

“The critical issue is the agenda changing,” Rep. Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroCongress needs to bring family and medical leave policies into the 21st century Push for paid family leave heats up ahead of 2020 Gillibrand offers to 'sit down' with Trump to discuss family leave MORE (Conn.), the senior Democrat on the House Appropriations Committee’s health and labor panel, said Friday by phone.

The 14-term lawmaker rattled off a list of gender-based issues Democrats are vowing to tackle if they take control of the House, including women’s health care, domestic violence, equal pay and family leave. DeLauro said those were once considered “fringe issues” that went too long ignored or underfunded by Republicans who have controlled the chamber since 2011. She’s been passing out a pamphlet to fellow Democrats arguing that women are uniquely positioned to turn the ship around.

“When women take the gavel, Congress responds to the major issues facing working families today,” it reads.

Rep. Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGetteOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Drug pricing fight centers on insulin | Florida governor working with Trump to import cheaper drugs | Dems blast proposed ObamaCare changes Drug pricing fight centers on insulin Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Powerful House committee turns to drug pricing | Utah governor defies voters on Medicaid expansion | Dems want answers on controversial new opioid MORE (D-Colo.) argued another benefit of having women in charge: They are simply more open to compromise, a breath of fresh air in a Congress practically defined by partisan conflict.

“I believe women tend to find common ground, work together and accomplish big tasks,” said DeGette, who’s in line to lead the oversight subpanel of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

“As more of us get elected to Congress and fill these critical leadership roles, chances are good that we will see less gridlock and more cooperation.”

They may have a chance to prove that theory next year.

Democratic women are set to take control of six full House committees if the lower chamber flips in November. They include Reps. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersPrivate insurance plays a critical part in home mortgage ecosystem On The Money: Lawmakers closing in on border deal | Dems build case for Trump tax returns | Trump, Xi won't meet before trade deadline | Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony on lifting of sanctions on Russian firms MORE (N.Y.), of Financial Services; Nydia VelazquezNydia Margarita VelasquezDOJ inspector general to investigate Brooklyn detention center power outage Ocasio-Cortez storms Washington, winning headlines but rankling some colleagues Women poised to take charge in Dem majority MORE (N.Y.), of Small Business; Eddie Bernice JohnsonEddie Bernice JohnsonOvernight Energy: Zinke joins Trump-tied lobbying firm | Senators highlight threat from invasive species | Top Republican calls for Green New Deal vote in House Congress can stop the war on science Black Caucus sees power grow with new Democratic majority MORE (Texas), of Science, Space and Technology; Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenFeminine hygiene products to be available to House lawmakers using congressional funds Whitaker takes grilling from House lawmakers Democrats launch ‘drain-the-swamp’ agenda MORE (Calif.), of House Administration; and Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyAmazon exec invites Ocasio-Cortez to tour facilities after criticism Dem lawmaker rips opposition to Amazon going into New York: 'Now we're protesting jobs' Democrat vows to move forward with impeachment, dividing his party MORE (N.Y.), of the Joint Economic Committee.

Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week How the border deal came together Winners and losers in the border security deal MORE (N.Y.) would become the first woman in history to chair the powerful Appropriations Committee.

In addition, 34 subcommittee gavels appear poised to go to Democratic women if the party takes the House. Those include spots atop five Appropriations panels, as well as influence over other major issues: digital commerce (Illinois Rep. Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Trump, Dems open drug price talks | FDA warns against infusing young people's blood | Facebook under scrutiny over health data | Harris says Medicare for all isn't socialism Hillicon Valley: Kremlin seeks more control over Russian internet | Huawei CEO denies links to Chinese government | Facebook accused of exposing health data | Harris calls for paper ballots | Twitter updates ad rules ahead of EU election Patients, health data experts accuse Facebook of exposing personal info MORE); counterterrorism (New York Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceDem lawmakers to open probe into ‘complex web of relationships’ between NRA, Russia McCarthy, allies retaliate against Freedom Caucus leader How Pelosi is punishing some critics while rewarding others MORE); higher education (California Rep. Susan DavisSusan Carol DavisOvernight Defense: Gillibrand offers bill to let transgender troops serve | Pentagon ready to protect US personnel in Venezuela | Dems revive fight with Trump over Saudis Gillibrand introduces bipartisan bill to allow transgender military service Bold, bipartisan action on child care will win plenty of friends MORE); and immigration (Lofgren).

The numbers could fluctuate, but Democrats tend to defer to seniority when it comes to naming committee heads — a system Democratic Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiWhy Omar’s views are dangerous Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Graham clashed with Pentagon chief over Syria | Talk grows that Trump will fire Coats | Coast Guard officer accused of domestic terrorism plot MORE (Calif.) has largely honored — and challenges are rare.

Party leaders are practically giddy at the thought of positioning more women in power, and they’re taking a page from the late Ann Richards, a former Democratic governor of Texas: "If you don’t have a seat at the table, you’re likely on the menu."

Pelosi on Friday went a step further.

"It is absolutely vital that women leaders take their rightful seat at the table: at the head of the table,” she told The Hill in an email.

The potential for 40 women in high posts contrasts starkly with the Republican-led Congress, where leaders have long been accused of empowering men at the expense of female voices. Former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerCrowley, Shuster moving to K Street On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Bill Clinton jokes no one would skip Dingell's funeral: 'Only time' we could get the last word MORE (R-Ohio) came under fire in 2012 when Republicans seated an all-male slate of committee heads for the following Congress. Under pressure, he later appointed then-Rep. Candice MillerCandice Sue MillerWomen poised to take charge in Dem majority GOP puts Obama on notice over visa carve-outs Wilson endorses Foxx as next House Education chairman MORE (R-Mich.) to lead the Administration Committee.

Since then, Republican women have fared better. In the current Congress, three full committees are headed by women — Reps. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackLamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee Juan Williams: The GOP's worsening problem with women How to reform the federal electric vehicle tax credit MORE (Tenn.) on Budget, Virginia FoxxVirginia Ann FoxxBlack Caucus sees power grow with new Democratic majority A 2 billion challenge: Transforming US grant reporting Trump calls North Carolina redistricting ruling ‘unfair’ MORE (N.C.) on Education and the Workforce, and Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for House Dems unveil initial GOP targets in 2020 MORE (Ind.) on Ethics — and nine others hold the gavel of subcommittees. Four of the 12 are retiring or seeking higher office after this Congress.

GOP leaders are quick to reject the notion that they’re out of touch with women’s issues. Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersHillicon Valley: Republicans demand answers from mobile carriers on data practices | Top carriers to stop selling location data | DOJ probing Huawei | T-Mobile execs stayed at Trump hotel as merger awaited approval House Republicans question mobile carriers on data practices Washington governor announces killer whale recovery plan MORE (Wash.), the fourth-ranking House Republican, has long argued that GOP policies like ObamaCare repeal and tax cuts will do more to benefit women than the Democrats’ favored prescriptions. Her office declined to comment for this story, but in May she trumpeted the advantages of having more female representation on Capitol Hill.

“Being a mom makes politics real,” she told Fox News. “That’s why it’s so critical that more women and moms are elected to Congress."

The Republicans’ campaign arm also features several women in its leadership ranks. Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP announces members who will serve on House intel panel Bipartisan House group introduces bills to stall Syria, South Korea troop withdrawals House votes on 10th bill to reopen government MORE (N.Y.) is heading recruitment efforts for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), while Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.) is the group’s vice chairperson.

NRCC spokesman Jesse Hunt pushed back on the notion that Democrats somehow have a lock on women’s interests.

“Some of the best Republican candidates this cycle are women and we’re confident we’ll see them representing their districts for years to come,” Hunt said in an email.

Democrats have long touted the gender diversity of their caucus as evidence that they're the more inclusive party, one that better represents the different interests of the country at large. And they’re no strangers to propelling women to power.

Pelosi has led the party since 2003, rising in 2007 to become the first female Speaker in the nation’s history. And with several women already announcing bids for leadership positions next year, the number of women at the highest ranks of the party appears ripe to grow.

The 2018 cycle is the first since the anti-harassment "Me Too" movement swept the country, toppling titans of business, Hollywood, the media and a handful of lawmakers on Capitol Hill, including the Democrats’ own veteran Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersDemocrats seek cosponsors for new 'Medicare for all' bill Virginia scandals pit Democrats against themselves and their message Women's March plans 'Medicare for All' day of lobbying in DC MORE (Mich.), who was forced out last year.

With Trump dogged by scandals that include allegations of sexual assault and paying hush money to a porn star, the would-be Democratic gavel holders see an opening on the campaign trail, vowing the tough oversight they say has been neglected under Republican rule.

“You can bet the President and his allies within the administration will not be getting a free pass,” DeGette said. “I’ll work to make these inquiries bipartisan when possible, but the priority has to be getting the answers our constituents want and deserve.”

DeLauro, citing gains the Democrats have made fighting child separations at the border, summarized the Democrats’ hopeful sentiments in one sentence: “Imagine what we could do if we were in the majority.”