Ryan removes GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter from committee assignments following indictment

Ryan removes GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter from committee assignments following indictment
© Greg Nash

Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow the Trump tax law passed: Dealing with a health care hangover Dems fight to protect Mueller amid Rosenstein rumors Jordan wants Rosenstein to testify before House Judiciary Committee MORE (R-Wis.) said Tuesday that Rep. Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterIndicted lawmaker angers GOP with decision to run for reelection Trump to nominate retiring lawmaker as head of trade agency Indicted GOP lawmaker to stay on ballot in New York this fall: report MORE (R-Calif.) will be removed from House committees after he was charged with misusing at least $250,000 in campaign funds for personal expenses.

"The charges against Rep. Hunter are deeply serious. The Ethics Committee deferred its investigation at the request of the Justice Department," Ryan said in a statement.

"Now that he has been indicted, Rep. Hunter will be removed from his committee assignments pending the resolution of this matter," he added.

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Hunter is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the Education and the Workforce Committee.

The Department of Justice alleged in an indictment Tuesday against Hunter and his wife, Margaret Hunter, that the GOP congressman used campaign funds to purchase trips to Italy and Hawaii, pay for his family's dental work, his children's tuition and international travel for nearly a dozen relatives.

He also allegedly spent thousands on "fast food, movie tickets, golf outings, video games, coffee, groceries, home utilities, and expensive meals."

The Justice Department said Hunter falsified campaign records filed to the Federal Election Commission to conceal the purchases.

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHillicon Valley: State officials share tech privacy concerns with Sessions | Senator says election security bill won't pass before midterms | Instagram co-founders leave Facebook | Google chief to meet GOP lawmakers over bias claims Collins defends ad showing opponent speaking Korean against claims of bigotry Hoyer questions feasibility of new threshold for Speaker nomination MORE (D-Calif.) called on Hunter to resign over the charges.

Despite the indictment, Hunter will remain on the ballot in California's 50th Congressional District in November. A spokesman for the California secretary of state said in a statement to The Hill that there is no process to remove his name from the ballot.

Hunter will face a Democratic challenger, Ammar Campa-Najjar, in a district that President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: Dems playing destructive 'con game' with Kavanaugh Several Yale Law classmates who backed Kavanaugh call for misconduct investigation Freedom Caucus calls on Rosenstein to testify or resign MORE won by 15 points in 2016.