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McCarthy leads GOP charge against Silicon Valley

McCarthy leads GOP charge against Silicon Valley

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyTrump has 'zero desire' to be Speaker, spokesman says Hillicon Valley: Cyber agency says SolarWinds hack could have been deterred | Civil rights groups urge lawmakers to crack down on Amazon's 'dangerous' worker surveillance | Manchin-led committee puts forth sprawling energy infrastructure proposal Chuck Todd reluctant to 'ban' election deniers from 'Meet the Press' MORE is leading the charge against President TrumpDonald TrumpGuardian Angels founder Curtis Sliwa wins GOP primary in NYC mayor's race Garland dismisses broad review of politicization of DOJ under Trump Schumer vows next steps after 'ridiculous,' 'awful' GOP election bill filibuster MORE’s new favorite punching bag: big tech.

The California Republican, who hopes to replace Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanCutting critical family support won't solve the labor crisis Juan Williams: Trump's GOP descends into farce Now we know why Biden was afraid of a joint presser with Putin MORE (R-Wis.) next year, has been aggressively promoting a campaign to “stop the bias,” referring to what critics say is a pattern of discrimination against conservative voices on social media.

To that end, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is scheduled to testify on Capitol Hill this week at a hearing requested by McCarthy.

“I’ve had many conversations with the president about how we have to stop this bias,” McCarthy, one of Trump’s closest allies on Capitol Hill, told Fox News on Thursday.

“I’ve spoken to Jack Dorsey throughout the month,” McCarthy added. “He and I philosophically disagree, but we do agree on one thing: We believe in the First Amendment. But we also believe in transparency and accountability.”

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The majority leader’s recent crusade against social media comes at a time when Trump has ramped up his own rhetoric against the tech industry. His eagerness to champion the cause could endear him to both the White House and conservative lawmakers — two constituencies that could be crucial to securing the Speakership.

Trump recently asserted that Google and other platforms are “rigged” against him, an accusation that Google rejected, and one that came on the heels of allegations from conservatives that Twitter has been “shadow banning” certain Republicans so that their accounts are less visible to users.

That controversy started after prominent conservatives aligned with Trump, including Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzKatie Hill says 'it would take a lot' to convince her to run again for House GOP divided over bills targeting tech giants Kinzinger: Conspiracy theory FBI planned Jan. 6 example of 'legacy of Trump and Trumpism' MORE (R-Fla.), House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsTech industry pushes for delay in antitrust legislation Head of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to go-it-alone on infrastructure as bipartisan plan falters MORE (R-N.C.) and Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanPowell says pickup in job gains likely this fall Tech industry pushes for delay in antitrust legislation The antitrust package is a Trojan horse conservatives must reject MORE (R-Ohio) failed to appear on Twitter’s auto-populated drop-down search box when users typed in their names.

The company said that it does not “shadow ban” according to political ideology, but acknowledged that its attempts to crack down on hate speech have unintentionally reduced search results for lawmakers from both parties.

McCarthy was quick to take up the mantle on the issue, tweeting more than a dozen times last month with the hashtag “stop the bias.” He also made the media rounds to step up pressure on Dorsey to publicly testify on Capitol Hill.

But not all of McCarthy’s efforts on that front were successful. One of his tweets attempting to demonstrate censorship of conservatives drew criticism for being misleading.

After sharing a screenshot of a tweet from Fox News host Laura Ingraham that was covered by language warning of “potentially sensitive content,” Twitter users were quick to point out that Ingraham’s tweet was covered up due to settings in McCarthy’s own Twitter account, not because of a company campaign to silence conservative voices.

Still, the crusade to keep the issue of alleged anti-conservative bias in the spotlight could earn McCarthy some political capital. One of the lawmakers who Republicans say has been targeted by Twitter’s “shadow banning” practice is Jordan, a leader of the Freedom Caucus who is also running for Speaker.

While Jordan may struggle to secure the 218 votes needed to win the gavel, his far-right group has the power to veto any Speaker hopeful if Republicans retain control of the House in the midterm elections.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee on Wednesday will hear testimony from Dorsey, but it’s unclear whether Congress or the Trump administration will take any action against tech and social media companies, which lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have been reluctant to regulate further.

Proposed steps for regulation, however, could include making Facebook and other social media platforms a public utility, forcing Google to be more transparent about its algorithms and making it easier for individuals to sue technology companies.

McCarthy says all options are on the table.

“Congress is going to look at everything, because of how powerful they have become,” he told Fox News.