GOP's reaction to Trump ripping DOJ indictments: Silence


GOP's reaction to Trump ripping DOJ indictments: Silence

© Greg Nash

Congressional Republican leaders have mostly been silent about President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: 'I will not let Iran have nuclear weapons' Rocket attack hits Baghdad's Green Zone amid escalating tensions: reports Buttigieg on Trump tweets: 'I don't care' MORE's tweet that his own Justice Department should have weighed the political consequences before indicting his two earliest GOP supporters on Capitol Hill.

Critics in the legal community, meanwhile, have called it a “disgrace,” “dangerous and stupid,” and possibly an “impeachable offense.”

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The muted GOP reaction from Capitol Hill isn't surprising. Republican leaders and rank-and-file lawmakers have been reluctant to directly call out or criticize the unorthodox leader of their party, fearful of becoming the target of his ire and his tweets.

But Trump’s Labor Day tweet may represent the most egregious example to date of the president interfering with ongoing Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations and engaging in what many are calling blatant obstruction of justice.

"This tweet alone may be an impeachable offense," legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin said on CNN's "New Day." "This is such a disgrace. This is so contrary to the traditions of the Department of Justice." 

Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderEric Holder: 'There are grounds for impeachment' in Mueller report Prosecutor appointed by Barr poised to enter Washington firestorm Dems struggle to make Trump bend on probes MORE, who served as attorney general under President Obama, knocked Trump’s tweet as “so dangerous and stupid it’s mind boggling. This is a fundamental threat to the rule of law.”

Trump’s tweet also sparked criticism from former officials who served under the president.

“That’s just not how the Department of Justice works,” Ian Prior, a former Justice Department spokesman in the Trump administration, told The Hill on Tuesday. “They do not prosecute people based on political affiliation and they do not pass on prosecuting people based on political affiliation. That’s called selective prosecution and those things get thrown out in court.”

Taking to Twitter a day earlier, Trump blasted Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump Chris Wallace: AG Barr 'clearly is protecting' Trump Appeals court rules Trump end of DACA was unlawful MORE and the DOJ for bringing “well publicized” charges against Reps. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsHouse ethics panel renews probes into three GOP lawmakers The Hill's Morning Report - Barr stiff-arms House following Senate grilling Trump ally in House calls for doubling gas tax to pay for infrastructure MORE (R-N.Y.) and Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterHouse ethics panel renews probes into three GOP lawmakers GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter accused of violating 'parole' after pretending to cross US-Mexico border Challenger outraises embattled California rep ahead of 2020 rematch MORE (R-Calif.), two vocal Trump defenders, just weeks before the Nov. 6 midterms. The president suggested that the indictments may have cost the party these two deep-red seats — and possibly the House majority.

“Two long running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department,” Trump tweeted. “Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff......

“The Democrats, none of whom voted for Jeff Sessions, must love him now.”

Trump’s tweet marked the latest broadside in a months-long war against his own attorney general and Justice Department from a president still furious that Sessions recused himself last year from any DOJ probes into the 2016 election. That decision eventually led to the appointment of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE, whose Russia investigation Trump has dismissed as a politically motivated “witch hunt” and something that Sessions must stop.

Now, Trump is getting personally involved in the criminal investigations into two House allies, a departure from protocol which dictates that the DOJ and FBI should operate independently from the White House.

Federal prosecutors last month charged Collins, his son and others with insider trading related to an Australian biopharmaceutical firm where the New York congressman had been a board member and major investor. Weeks later, the DOJ charged Hunter and his wife with misusing campaign funds on things like lavish meals, alcohol and personal trips.

Both Collins and Hunter have maintained their innocence.
Save for a handful of outspoken Trump critics, most of Collins’s and Hunter’s Hill colleagues have declined to comment about Trump’s latest firestorm, or pushed back half-heartedly without uttering the name “Trump.”

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward Cruz Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate MORE (R-Texas), a one-time presidential rival to Trump, declined to comment to reporters about Trump’s DOJ attacks but took a swipe at the media for being “obsessed” with Trump’s tweets.

Spokespeople for House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOn The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada Congressional leaders to launch budget talks with White House RNC chair on Alabama abortion bill: I would have exceptions for rape, incest MORE (R-Calif.) and Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseTrump encouraged Scalise to run for governor in Louisiana: report We owe a debt of gratitude to all our police officers and their families House votes to extend flood insurance program MORE (R-La.), both mentioned as possible Speaker candidates, did not respond to requests for comment. Ohio Rep. Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversThirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill House bill seeks to bolster security for synagogues, mosques in wake of attacks Congress can open financial institutions to legal cannabis industry with SAFE Banking Act MORE, the GOP campaign chief, told The Hill on Tuesday he had not seen Trump’s tweet yet.

Outgoing Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDebate with Donald Trump? Just say no Ex-Trump adviser says GOP needs a better health-care message for 2020 Liz Cheney faces a big decision on her future MORE (R-Wis.) had asked both Collins and Hunter to step down from their committees following the indictments, but Ryan’s office did not directly name the president as it emphasized that the Justice Department should operate independently.

“DOJ should always remain apolitical, and the speaker has demonstrated he takes these charges seriously,” said Ryan spokeswoman AshLee Strong.

Asked on Fox News if Trump should be picking fights with Sessions, Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynTrump's immigration push faces Capitol Hill buzzsaw The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate Sinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race MORE (R-Texas) said he wished the two men could “work this out between themselves and not do it on social media.

“But the attorney general, I believe is doing the job he thinks he's required to do under his oath,” Cornyn added, “and I think the president should keep him in place as long as the two of them can get along.”

Trump’s DOJ tweet came after a week of memorial services in Phoenix and Washington for the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainPelosi receives John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award Romney: Trump 'has distanced himself from some of the best qualities of the human character' MSNBC host: Barr 'the most dangerous person' who works for Trump MORE (R-Ariz.), who had clashed repeatedly with the president on foreign policy, ObamaCare repeal, the merits of torture and what constitutes patriotism.

There is a dwindling number of Trump detractors in the GOP in the wake of McCain's death and the pending retirements of Sens. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerCorker: 'I just don't' see path to challenge Trump in 2020 Ex-GOP Sen. Corker: Trump primary would be 'good thing for our country' Pollster says Trump unlikely to face 'significant' primary challenge MORE (R-Tenn.) and Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeWANTED: A Republican with courage Protesters who went viral confronting Flake cheered at award event Feinstein to introduce bill raising age to purchase assault weapons after California shooting MORE (R-Ariz.).

Sen. Ben SasseBenjamin (Ben) Eric SasseSenate Republicans running away from Alabama abortion law Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order to protect US networks from Chinese tech | Huawei downplays order | Trump declines to join effort against online extremism | Facebook restricts livestreaming | FCC proposes new tool against robocalls Huawei officials say they would 'welcome' US ban on tech posing national security risk MORE (R-Neb.), who hasn't shied away from knocking Trump, ripped the president for his tweet over the weekend.

"The United States is not some banana republic with a two-tiered system of justice – one for the majority party and one for the minority party," Sasse said in a statement.

"Instead of commenting on ongoing investigations and prosecutions,” the senator continued, “the job of the President of the United States is to defend the Constitution and protect the impartial administration of justice."

Rep. Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloDisinvited GOP lawmaker turns up at Dem hearing Overnight Energy: 2020 rivals rip Biden over expected 'middle ground' climate plan | Dems cancel plans to invite Republican to testify on climate change | House passes .2B disaster aid bill over Trump objections Dems cancel plans to bring in Republican as climate change witness MORE (R-Fla.), another vocal Trump critic, retweeted Sasse’s statement, adding “+1” to indicate he agreed with it. But pressed for a comment of his own, Curbelo declined to elaborate.

Another lawmaker who’s frequently clashed with Trump, Rep. Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesEx-Greenville mayor wins Dem primary in North Carolina, GOP candidates head to runoff North Carolina reporter says there could be 'new crop' of GOP candidates in 9th Congressional District race House pays tribute to Walter Jones MORE (R-N.C.), said he was “disappointed” by Trump’s attacks on Sessions. But Jones, too, made no direct reference to the president himself.  

“I’m very disappointed by recent comments denigrating AG Sessions for doing his job,” Jones said in a statement. “The Attorney General swears an oath to defend the Constitution of the United States, not to prosecute crimes based on political affiliation.

“Lady Justice wears a blindfold for a reason.”

Morgan Chalfant, Jordain Carney, Juliegrace Brufke and Mike Lillis contributed.