Ryan pushes back on Trump DOJ attack: 'Justice should be blind'

Ryan pushes back on Trump DOJ attack: 'Justice should be blind'
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Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race McCabe: No one in 'Gang of Eight' objected to FBI probe into Trump Unscripted Trump keeps audience guessing in Rose Garden MORE (R-Wis.) reaffirmed that the U.S. justice system “should be blind” on Wednesday, two days after President TrumpDonald John TrumpJustice Department preparing for Mueller report as soon as next week: reports Smollett lawyers declare 'Empire' star innocent Pelosi asks members to support resolution against emergency declaration MORE lashed out at Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsDems seize on Times bombshell to push allegations of Trump obstruction Mueller report may be 'anti-climactic,' says ex-intelligence director CNN ripped for hiring former Republican operative as political editor: 'WTF?!?!' MORE for prosecuting two of Trump’s early GOP supporters.

“Justice is blind. Justice should be blind and should have no [consideration] with respect to political party. That’s the emblem of the Justice Department: blind justice,” Ryan told reporters in his first news conference since the House’s summer recess.

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“So I think it’s very important that we respect the fact that justice should be blind. It should have no impact on political party and I think the process is working its way as it should.”

Ryan, however, did not utter Trump's name during his remarks.

Two of Ryan’s House GOP colleagues — Rep. Chris CollinsChristopher (Chris) Carl CollinsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for Fighting AIDS domestically and globally means pushing more evidence-based services MORE of New York and Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for House Dems unveil initial GOP targets in 2020 MORE of California — were indicted by the Justice Department over the August break. Collins, his son and others were charged with insider trading. Hunter and his wife were charged with misusing campaign funds and other crimes.

Collins and Hunter were the first members of Congress to endorse Trump in the 2016 GOP presidential primary.

On Labor Day, Trump made his feelings known, slamming Sessions, his own attorney general, for bringing charges against fellow Republicans and possibly costing them their seats this fall.

“Two long running, Obama era, investigations of  two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department,” Trump tweeted. “Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff......”

Along with the conviction of Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortJustice Department preparing for Mueller report as soon as next week: reports Five things to know about Trump confidant Tom Barrack Trump has publicly criticized Russia probe more than 1,100 times: NY Times MORE, and guilty pleas from Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, Democrats are trying to paint the GOP as the party of rampant corruption before the November midterms.

But Ryan called the Collins and Hunter indictments “isolated incidents,” and argued that tax cuts and the strong economy would carry Republicans through the election.

“We’ve taken the appropriate action. We’ve removed these members from their committees, which is what we do in these kinds of situations, which have happened on the other side of the aisle as well. These are isolated incidents,” Ryan said.

“Our members are working hard at doing their jobs … to improve people’s lives. We have an agenda we’re proud of, and we have more work to do that we’re going to complete,” he added. “And that’s going to be the story that’s going to dominate.”

--Updated at 11:25 a.m.