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Conservatives blame McCarthy for Twitter getting before favorable committee

Conservatives blame McCarthy for Twitter getting before favorable committee
© Greg Nash

House conservatives are blaming Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyMcCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 Democrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' Sunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues MORE (R-Calif.) for Twitter’s decision to have its founder publicly testify before the Energy and Commerce Committee instead of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, where a number of conservative members sit.

The far-right Freedom Caucus and its allies argued that Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was likely to get a more favorable reception from the Energy and Commerce panel in comparison to Oversight, which counts Freedom Caucus leaders Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsHow scientists saved Trump's FDA from politics Liberals howl after Democrats cave on witnesses Kinzinger calls for people with info on Trump to come forward MORE (R-N.C.) and Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanDemocrats don't trust GOP on 1/6 commission: 'These people are dangerous' The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Divided House on full display Trump to reemerge on political scene at CPAC MORE (R-Ohio) among its members.

“The majority leader talks tough on tech then sends [Dorsey] to the friendly confines of the industry-friendly Energy & Commerce Committee,” Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzGrenell hints at potential California gubernatorial bid Trump to reemerge on political scene at CPAC Former Trump officials eye bids for political office MORE (R-Fla.), who says he has been unfairly censored on social media, told The Hill.  

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Gaetz, who is not a Freedom Caucus member, said that when he complained to McCarthy, the leader told him he should trust the members of the other panel.

“I had a discussion with him about this. He told me to trust my colleagues more,” Gaetz said.

In a brief interview in the Capitol, McCarthy downplayed the spat and said it was clear that Energy and Commerce had jurisdiction over communications and technology issues, especially when it pertains to broad-based consumer issues. The Energy and Commerce Committee also has its own oversight and investigative subcommittee.

“It’s the same thing we do with any bill. People go to the jurisdiction. E&C has the jurisdiction over these things, so that’s why it went to E&C,” McCarthy said Wednesday, a position that was echoed by Oversight Committee Chairman Trey GowdyTrey GowdyPompeo rebukes Biden's new foreign policy The Hunter Biden problem won't go away Sunday shows preview: Joe Biden wins the 2020 election MORE (R-S.C.).

Asked if he personally made the decision for Dorsey to appear before Energy and Commerce, McCarthy replied, “No, it’s not my call.”

Both panels had aggressively fought to get Dorsey to appear before their committees so they could grill him on allegations of conservative bias on social media. Both invited Dorsey to testify.

Freedom Caucus members say McCarthy played a pivotal role in convincing Twitter and Dorsey to choose the Energy and Commerce Committee over the Oversight committee.

McCarthy sent a letter to Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenHere are the three GOP lawmakers who voted for the Equality Act Lobbying world Bottom line MORE (R-Ore.) in August calling for him to invite Dorsey to a hearing.

“I would like to request a hearing with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey so that the American people can learn more about the filtering and censorship practices on his platform," McCarthy wrote.

Conservatives say McCarthy could and should have done more to get Dorsey to go before Oversight.

A leadership aide said it’s not up to leadership to dictate to private or public companies which committees — or how many — they should appear before.

Some conservatives believe maneuvering for future leadership fights played a role.

Jordan  — who says he has been directly targeted by Twitter’s anti-conservative bias — also is challenging McCarthy for the Speaker’s gavel. Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanCruz hires Trump campaign press aide as communications director Bottom line Ex-Trump chief of staff Priebus mulling Wisconsin governor bid MORE (R-Wis.), who is backing McCarthy, plans to retire from Congress in January.

Denying the Oversight panel a chance to take a crack at Dorsey undercuts Jordan, his allies believe.

“It kind of seems like McCarthy doesn’t want to elevate Jordan,” said one conservative senior GOP aide.

But two other potential McCarthy rivals — Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseMerrick Garland is right to prioritize domestic terrorism, but he'll need a bigger boat Why Congress must invoke the 14th Amendment now The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Ahead: One-shot vax, easing restrictions, fiscal help MORE (R-La.) and GOP Conference Chair Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersHillicon Valley: Biden signs order on chips | Hearing on media misinformation | Facebook's deal with Australia | CIA nominee on SolarWinds Democrats' letter targeting Fox, Newsmax for misinformation sparks clash during hearing House panel to dive into misinformation debate MORE (R-Wash.) — sit on the Energy and Commerce Committee and will get a chance to question Dorsey on Wednesday afternoon, when he appears before the panel. So will conservatives like Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnPassage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Biden signs supply chain order after 'positive' meeting with lawmakers Biden health nominee faces first Senate test MORE (R-Tenn.), who is running for Senate, and Reps. Joe BartonJoe Linus BartonRep. Ron Wright dies after contracting COVID-19 Biden's gain is Democratic baseball's loss with Cedric Richmond Bottom line MORE (R-Texas), Morgan GriffithHoward (Morgan) Morgan GriffithHouse Republicans urge Democrats to call hearing with tech CEOs Democrats to levy fines on maskless lawmakers on House floor READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE (R-Va.) and Jeff DuncanJeffrey (Jeff) Darren DuncanREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Here are the Republicans planning to challenge the Electoral College results Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee MORE (R-S.C.) — all three of whom are Freedom Caucus members.

McCarthy, once a darling of Silicon Valley, has been aggressively leading the GOP charge against tech companies, one of President TrumpDonald TrumpNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors McCarthy: 'I would bet my house' GOP takes back lower chamber in 2022 MORE’s new favorite punching bags. The majority leader, who is close to Trump, has tweeted over a dozen times last month to “stop the bias,” referring to what critics say is a pattern of censoring conservative voices on social media.

His letter to Walden came after Twitter denied in a blog post that it practiced “shadow-banning” — or hiding tweets and profiles of misbehaving Twitter users without removing them from the site — of users based on political leanings.

That controversy started after prominent conservatives aligned with Trump, including Jordan, Gaetz and Meadows failed to appear on Twitter’s auto-populated drop-down search box when users typed in their names.

That’s why Meadows and Jordan, who each chair an Oversight subcommittee, were itching to have Dorsey testify in front of their panel, where he would likely face a tougher grilling.

“There is a real frustration among those of us that were targeted by Twitter that there was not a more inclusive process to allow us to be a part of the questioning of Jack Dorsey,” Meadows told The Hill.

Some Oversight members asked to join Wednesday’s Energy and Commerce hearing, which would have required unanimous consent (UC) from the panel, but were rejected.

“I thought allowing us to be UCed in to participate in the hearing seemed like a very reasonable request that was ultimately denied by the committee,” Meadows said.

The Oversight Committee could subpoena Dorsey to force him to testify, but Jordan said that decision is up to Gowdy as chairman.

“All I know is, we were working to try to get them in front of Mark’s subcommittee and our subcommittee,” Jordan told reporters on Wednesday. “But Dorsey wouldn’t agree.”

Walden said the Energy and Commerce Committee is better equipped than the Oversight panel to handle the issue, because his committee has both oversight authority and the jurisdiction to take legislative steps, if needed.

“OGR is a great committee, but it has very limited legislative ability,” Walden told reporters on Wednesday. “So this is a bigger discussion about, get the facts, build the case, and see where we go legislatively.”

Walden declined to say whether he talked to GOP leadership or members of the Freedom Caucus about Twitter's decision to appear before Energy and Commerce.

“I’m not going to get into that,” he said.

On Wednesday morning, Dorsey and Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on election interference. Dorsey then appeared before the House Energy and Commerce Committee later in the afternoon on censoring and filtering practices.

-Juliegrace Brufke contributed