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Trump allies want Congress to find anonymous op-ed author

Key congressional allies of President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Georgia secretary of state withholds support for 'reactionary' GOP voting bills MORE are floating the idea that Congress could take steps to try and find out who wrote the anonymous op-ed in The New York Times disparaging the president.

That action could take the form of an investigation, legislation or hearings.

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"We’re looking right now at what’s the appropriate action from a legislative standpoint to review what’s happened," Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsHow scientists saved Trump's FDA from politics Liberals howl after Democrats cave on witnesses Kinzinger calls for people with info on Trump to come forward MORE (R-N.C.), the chairman of the conservative Freedom Caucus who also leads a subcommittee that conducts oversight of federal employees, told USA Today. "It is alarming when you have people … that would suggest resistance to the president that they’re serving, especially in light of discussion that may go into the national security realm."

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The AIDS Institute - Finger-pointing on Capitol riot; GOP balks at Biden relief plan Sanders votes against Biden USDA nominee Vilsack Senate confirms Vilsack as Agriculture secretary MORE (R-Ky.), a one-time presidential rival to Trump, suggested White House officials who hold a security clearance should undergo lie detector tests in an attempt to ferret out staffers speaking ill of the president.

And House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - J&J A-OK, Tanden in Trouble Feehery: How Republicans can win by focusing on schools Former RNC chair to Republicans looking for new Trump party: 'There's the door' MORE (R-La.) didn’t rule out the possibility of a congressional probe.

"I'm sure we have a number of members that are looking at it right now,” Scalise, the No. 3 Republican in House leadership, told The Hill.

Trump loyalists are enraged that there are administration officials working against the president, casting such agents as “cowards” and “spies” who should immediately resign. They have also lambasted The New York Times for printing an op-ed written by someone purportedly working as a senior administration official describing the actions of an internal resistance group.

But Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBottom line Ex-Trump chief of staff Priebus mulling Wisconsin governor bid In Marjorie Taylor Greene, a glimpse of the future MORE (R-Wis.) told reporters Thursday at his weekly news conference that he didn’t think Congress should be getting to the bottom of the op-ed mystery.

Asked if Congress has any role to investigate, Ryan replied: "Not that I know of." 

Rep. Dennis RossDennis Alan Ross Iran begins restricting watchdogs' access to nuclear sites: report Iran poses early test for Biden's diplomacy-first approach Biden's six-step strategy to rejoin the Iran nuclear agreement MORE (R-Fla.), who serves on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, also poured cold water on the idea that Congress should get involved. 

“Other than expressing your sentiment, there is little we can do, realistically," Ross told The Hill.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyDemocratic fury with GOP explodes in House Trump to attack Biden in CPAC speech McConnell knocks Pelosi Jan. 6 commission proposal: 'Partisan by design' MORE (R-Calif.) — one of Trump’s closest allies on Capitol Hill and the frontrunner to become the next Speaker if Republicans retain control of the House — said the administration, not Congress, should investigate the matter.

“I think the White House should look into it,” he told The Hill on Thursday, while raising concerns that the anonymous official could continue working for the administration.

“I think that's a real problem if that person stays in the job they currently are in,” he said.

The op-ed author described Trump as erratic, ill-informed and amoral. The writer also described a group of “unsung heroes” in and around the White House who have aggressively worked to halt Trump’s “agenda and his worst inclinations.”

Trump has called on The New York Times to reveal the identity of the author, saying he or she may have committed treason.

“If the GUTLESS anonymous person does indeed exist, the Times must, for National Security purposes, turn him/her over to government at once!” Trump tweeted.

Sebastian GorkaSebastian Lukacs GorkaLou Dobbs retweets supporters blasting decision to cancel show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Congress slogs toward COVID-19 relief, omnibus deal McEnany: WHCA should investigate Playboy's Karem for shouting 'demeaning' questions MORE, former deputy assistant and strategist to Trump, told The Hill that treason is a very real possibility.

“There are only two possible scenarios given the current lack of credibility the New York Times is suffering form and the wording of the piece: 1) This is a complete fabrication. 2) It was written by the low-level Obama-era holdover, not a ‘senior official’ given the complete lack of any evidence in the piece demonstrating that this was written by a person working close to the President,” Gorka wrote in a text message. 

“If it is the latter, then this is a textbook case of Sedition. And if this were 1917 or 1944 it would be Treason,” added Gorka, an opinion contributor to The Hill. “No one elected this person, as a result they have no choice but to dutifully serve the duly elected President. Or resign. If they don’t General Kelly will root them out and President Trump will fire them.”

Some GOP lawmakers close to Trump found themselves facing questions about the Times op-ed at an unrelated news conference at the Capitol on Thursday.

“I don’t believe that that person is doing a good service to faithfully execute their job and the performance of their duties," said GOP Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations NY Republicans want Justice Department to subpoena Cuomo over nursing homes Sunday shows preview: New COVID-19 variants spread in US; Redditors shake Wall Street with Gamestop stock MORE, who has campaigned with Trump in their home state of New York. “That person should not be inside of the administration and they should submit their letter of resignation and move onto something else.”

But Zeldin would not say whether the writer had committed treason, as the president intimated.

Another Trump ally, Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertNIH director: Mask politicalization may have cost 'tens of thousands' of lives in US Democrats should make the 'Bee-Gees' the face of the Republican Party GOP lawmakers call for Pelosi to be fined over new screenings MORE (R-Texas), interjected to say, “I think the job is called spy.”

Morgan Chalfant contributed.